flabbergasted vs stupefied what difference

what is difference between flabbergasted and stupefied

English

Alternative forms

  • flabagasted
  • flambergasted

Etymology

Past tense of flabbergast.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈflæbə(ˌ)ɡɑːstəd/, /ˈflæbə(ˌ)ɡæstəd/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈflæbɚˌɡæstəd/

Adjective

flabbergasted (comparative more flabbergasted, superlative most flabbergasted)

  1. Appalled, annoyed, exhausted or disgusted.
    • 1952, Agnes Morley Cleaveland. Satan’s Paradise: from Lucien Maxwell to Fred Lambert. Houghton-Mifflin.
      Maxwell made a lunge at his flabbergasted guest, who ducked just in time to escape the great hands reaching for him.
    • 2008, Dutch Sheets, Watchman Prayer: Keeping the Enemy Out While Protecting Your Family, Home. Gospel Light. page 57.
      From behind her paper, she was flabbergasted to see a neatly dressed man helping himself to her cookies.
  2. (euphemistic, rare) Damned.

Synonyms

See Thesaurus:astonished

Translations

Verb

flabbergasted

  1. simple past tense and past participle of flabbergast

References

Anagrams

  • gabberflasted


English

Verb

stupefied

  1. simple past tense and past participle of stupefy

Adjective

stupefied (comparative more stupefied, superlative most stupefied)

  1. Experiencing stupefaction.
    • 1855, Robert Browning, “Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came”, XIII:
      One stiff blind horse, his every bone a-stare, / Stood stupefied, however he came there: / Thrust out past service from the devil’s stud!
  2. Experiencing the influence of an ingested mind-altering substance.

Synonyms

  • intoxicated

Related terms

  • stupefiedness

Translations


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