flag vs iris what difference

what is difference between flag and iris

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /flæɡ/
  • (North American also) IPA(key): /fleɪɡ/
  • Rhymes: -æɡ, -eɪɡ

Etymology 1

From Middle English flag, flagge (flag), further etymology uncertain. Perhaps from or related to early Middle English flage (name for a baby’s garment) and Old English flagg, flacg (cataplasm, poultice, plaster). Or, perhaps ultimately imitative, or otherwise drawn from Proto-Germanic *flaką (something flat), from Proto-Indo-European *pleh₂- (flat, broad, plain), referring to the shape.

Germanic cognates include Saterland Frisian Flaage (flag), West Frisian flagge (flag), Dutch vlag (flag), German Flagge (flag), Swedish flagg (flag), Danish flag (flag, ship’s flag). Compare also Middle English flacken (to flutter, palpitate), Swedish dialectal flage (to flutter in the wind), Old Norse flögra (to flap about). Akin to Old High German flogarōn (to flutter), Old High German flogezen (to flutter, flicker), Middle English flakeren (to move quickly to and fro), Old English flacor (fluttering, flying). More at flack, flacker.

Noun

flag (countable and uncountable, plural flags)

  1. A piece of cloth, often decorated with an emblem, used as a visual signal or symbol.
  2. An exact representation of a flag (for example: a digital one used in websites).
  3. (nautical) A flag flown by a ship to show the presence on board of the admiral; the admiral himself, or his flagship.
  4. (nautical, often used attributively) A signal flag.
  5. The use of a flag, especially to indicate the start of a race or other event.
  6. (computer science) A variable or memory location that stores a true-or-false, yes-or-no value, typically either recording the fact that a certain event has occurred or requesting that a certain optional action take place.
  7. (computer science) In a command line interface, a command parameter requesting optional behavior or otherwise modifying the action of the command being invoked.
  8. (aviation) A mechanical indicator that pops up to draw the pilot’s attention to a problem or malfunction.
    • 1966, Barry J. Schiff, All about Flying: An Introduction to the World of Flying (page 72)
      I was shooting an IFR approach down the San Francisco slot, when all of a sudden the ILS flag popped up.
    • 1980, Paul Garrison, Flying VFR in marginal weather (page 139)
      [] and then the OFF flag popped up and the needle went dead.
  9. (Britain, uncountable) The game of capture the flag.
  10. (geometry) A sequence of faces of a given polytope, one of each dimension up to that of the polytope (formally, though in practice not always explicitly, including the null face and the polytope itself), such that each face in the sequence is part of the next-higher dimension face.
    • 2002, Peter McMullen, Egon Schulte, Abstract Regular Polytopes, Encyclopedia of Mathematics and Its Applications 92, page 31,
      We call P (combinatorially) regular if its automorphism group Γ(P) is transitive on its flags.
    • 2006, Peter McMullen, Egon Schulte, Regular and Chiral Polytopes in Low Dimensions, Harold Scott Macdonald Coxeter, Chandler Davis, Erich W. Ellers (editors), The Coxeter Legacy: Reflections and Projections, page 91,
      Roughly speaking, chiral polytopes have half as many possible automorphisms as have regular polytopes. More technically, the n-polytope P is chiral if it has two orbits of flags under its group Γ(P), with adjacent flags in different orbits.
  11. (mathematics, linear algebra) A sequence of subspaces of a vector space, beginning with the null space and ending with the vector space itself, such that each member of the sequence (until the last) is a proper subspace of the next.
Synonyms
  • (computer science: true-or-false value): Boolean
  • (computer science: CLI notation): switch, option
  • (geometry: sequence of faces of a polytope): dart
Holonyms
  • (piece of cloth): bunting
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

flag (third-person singular simple present flags, present participle flagging, simple past and past participle flagged)

  1. To furnish or deck out with flags.
  2. To mark with a flag, especially to indicate the importance of something.
  3. (often with down) To signal to, especially to stop a passing vehicle etc.
    Please flag down a taxi for me.
  4. To convey (a message) by means of flag signals.
    to flag an order to troops or vessels at a distance
  5. (often with up) To note, mark or point out for attention.
    I’ve flagged up the need for further investigation into this.
    Users of the Internet forum can flag others’ posts as inappropriate.
  6. (computing) To signal (an event).
    The compiler flagged three errors.
  7. (computing) To set a program variable to true.
    Flag the debug option before running the program.
  8. To decoy (game) by waving a flag, handkerchief, etc. to arouse the animal’s curiosity.
    • 1885, Theodore Roosevelt, Hunting Trips of a Ranchman
      This method of hunting, however, is not so much practised now as formerly, as the antelope are getting continually shyer and more difficult to flag.
  9. (sports) To penalize for an infraction.
  10. (chess) To defeat (an opponent) on time, especially in a blitz game.
  11. (firearms) To point the muzzle of a firearm at a person or object one does not intend to fire on.
Translations

See also

Etymology 2

Perhaps from a variant of flack (to hang loose), from Middle English flacken; or perhaps from Old Norse.. Compare Middle Dutch flaggheren, vlaggheren (to droop, flag).

Verb

flag (third-person singular simple present flags, present participle flagging, simple past and past participle flagged)

  1. (intransitive) To weaken, become feeble.
    His strength flagged toward the end of the race.
    • 1724, Jonathan Swift, Drapier’s Letters, 2
      He now sees a spirit has been raised against him, and he only watches till it begin to flag.
  2. To hang loose without stiffness; to bend down, as flexible bodies; to be loose, yielding, limp.
    • 1817, Thomas Moore, Lalla-Rookh
      as loose it [the sail] flagged around the mast
  3. To let droop; to suffer to fall, or let fall, into feebleness.
    to flag the wings
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Prior to this entry?)
  4. To enervate; to exhaust the vigour or elasticity of.
    • 1670, John Eachard, The Ground and Occasions of the Contempt of the Clergy
      there is nothing that flags the Spirits, disorders the Blood, and enfeebles the whole Body of Man, as intense Studies.
Translations

Etymology 3

Of uncertain origin, perhaps from North Germanic; compare Danish flæg (yellow iris). Or, possibly from sense 1, referring to its motion in the wind. Compare also Dutch vlag.

Noun

flag (plural flags)

  1. Any of various plants with sword-shaped leaves, especially irises; specifically, Iris pseudacorus.
    • ca. 1607, William Shakespeare, Antony and Cleopatra, Act I, sc. 3:
      [T]he ebbed man, ne’er loved till ne’er worth love,
      Comes deared by being lacked. This common body,
      Like to a vagabond flag upon the stream,
      Goes to and back, lackeying the varying tide,
      To rot itself with motion.
    • 1611, King James Version, Job 8:11:
      Can the rush grow up without mire? can the flag grow without water?
    • before 1899, Robert Seymour Bridges, There is a Hill:
      And laden barges float
      By banks of myosote;
      And scented flag and golden flower-de-lys
      Delay the loitering boat.
Derived terms
  • sweet flag
Translations

Etymology 4

Probably of Scandinavian/North Germanic origin; compare Icelandic flag.

Noun

flag (plural flags)

  1. (obsolete except in dialects) A slice of turf; a sod.
  2. A slab of stone; a flagstone, a flat piece of stone used for paving.
  3. (geology) Any hard, evenly stratified sandstone, which splits into layers suitable for flagstones.
Translations

Verb

flag (third-person singular simple present flags, present participle flagging, simple past and past participle flagged)

  1. (transitive) To pave with flagstones.
    Fred is planning to flag his patio this weekend.
Translations

Etymology 5

Noun

flag (plural flags)

  1. A group of feathers on the lower part of the legs of certain hawks, owls, etc.
  2. A group of elongated wing feathers in certain hawks.
  3. The bushy tail of a dog such as a setter.
  4. (music) A hook attached to the stem of a written note that assigns its rhythmic value

References


Chinese

Etymology

Borrowed from Japanese フラグ, from English flag.

Definitions

flag

  1. (Internet slang, ACG) A plot or words of a character in an animation, etc., that would usually lead to a specific outcome or event, not logically or causally, but as a pattern of the animation, etc., for example the words like “I will stop doing evil after this one last job” from a character, who usually would not survive the “job”. Also figurative.
    死亡flag  ―  sǐwáng flag  ―  the words of a character which, as a pattern, usually follows the character’s death
  2. goal; resolution; statement of intent
    新年flag  ―  xīnnián flag  ―  New Year resolutions
    flag  ―  flag  ―  to set up a goal
    他的flag倒了。  ―  Tāde flag dǎole.  ―  He didn’t achieve the goal.
    • 很多同學立了flag要好好備考,然而好的學習方法能起到事半功倍的效果。 [MSC, trad.]
      很多同学立了flag要好好备考,然而好的学习方法能起到事半功倍的效果。 [MSC, simp.]

      From: 2020 April 11, “雅思中国网” (username), Weibo post
      Hěnduō tóngxué lìle flag yào hǎohǎo bèikǎo, rán’ér hǎode xuéxí fāngfǎ néng qǐdào shìbàngōngbèi de xiàoguǒ. [Pinyin]
      Many students stated there resolution to study hard for the test, and a good way to study can yield twice the result with half the effort.
    • “這輩子不打工”的flag就先擱置吧。 [MSC, trad.]
      “这辈子不打工”的flag就先搁置吧。 [MSC, simp.]

      From: 2020 April 11, The Beijing News, “Internet Celebrity Theif to be Released: Put Aside For Now the Resolution to “Not Get Employed Forever””
      “zhè bèizǐ bù dǎgōng” de flag jiù xiān gēzhì ba. [Pinyin]
      Put aside for now the resolution to “not get employed forever”.

Danish

Etymology

From Dutch or English flag

Noun

flag n (singular definite flaget, plural indefinite flag)

  1. flag (cloth)
  2. flag (true-false variable)

Inflection

Verb

flag

  1. imperative of flage

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English flag.

Pronunciation

  • (Netherlands) IPA(key): /flɛɡ/
  • Hyphenation: flag

Noun

flag m (plural flags, diminutive flagje n)

  1. (computing) flag

Icelandic

Etymology

From Old Norse flag, flaga, probably from Proto-Germanic *flaką (something flat), from Proto-Indo-European *pleh₂- (flat, broad, plain). However, compare Proto-Germanic *plaggą.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /flaːɣ/
  • Rhymes: -aːɣ

Noun

flag n (genitive singular flags, nominative plural flög)

  1. area of ground stripped of turf

Declension

Related terms

  • flaga

References


Portuguese

Etymology

From English flag.

Noun

flag m or f (in variation) (plural flags)

  1. (programming) flag (true-or-false variable)
    Synonym: booleano


English

Etymology

From Middle English [Term?], from Latin īris, from Ancient Greek ἶρις (îris, rainbow), from Proto-Indo-European *wey-ro- (a twist, thread, cord, wire), from *weh₁y- (to turn, twist, weave, plait). Cognate to English wire.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: ī’rĭs, IPA(key): /ˈaɪ.ɹɪs/
  • Rhymes: -aɪɹɪs

Noun

iris (plural irises or iris or irides) (See Usage notes)

  1. (botany) A plant of the genus Iris, common in the northern hemisphere, and generally having attractive blooms (See Iris (plant) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia ).
    • Breezes blowing from beds of iris quickened her breath with their perfume; she saw the tufted lilacs sway in the wind, and the streamers of mauve-tinted wistaria swinging, all a-glisten with golden bees; she saw a crimson cardinal winging through the foliage, and amorous tanagers flashing like scarlet flames athwart the pines.
  2. (anatomy) The contractile membrane perforated by the pupil, which adjusts to control the amount of light reaching the retina, and which forms the colored portion of the eye (See Iris (anatomy) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia ).
  3. (photography, cinematography) A diaphragm used to regulate the size of a hole, especially as a way of controlling the amount of light reaching a lens.
  4. (poetic) A rainbow, or other colourful refraction of light.
  5. (electronics) A constricted opening in the path inside a waveguide, used to form a resonator.
  6. (zoology) The inner circle of an oscillated color spot.

Usage notes

For the part of the eye, the usual medical plural is irides.

For the flower both iris and irises are in common use.

Quotations

For quotations using this term, see Citations:iris.

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Further reading

  • Iris (plant) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Iris (anatomy) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Verb

iris (third-person singular simple present irises, present participle irising, simple past and past participle irised)

  1. (of an aperture, lens, or door) To open or close in the manner of an iris.
  2. (literary) To cause (something) to shine with the colours of the rainbow; to make iridescent.
    Synonym: iridize
    • 1834, Jacob Abbott, The Corner-Stone, Boston: William Peirce, Chapter 1, p. 31,[1]
      Pure, transparent, glistening in the sun, and irised by a thousand hues, which float and wave and spread in graceful and ceaseless motion on its surface!
    • 1987, Charles Tomlinson, “Winter Journey” in The Return, Oxford University Press, p. 35,[2]
      The sun as it comes indoors out of space
      Has left a rainbow irising each glass—
      A refraction, caught then multiplied
      From the crystal tied within our window,

Anagrams

  • Siri

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin iris, from Ancient Greek ἶρις (îris).

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈi.ɾis/

Noun

iris m (plural iris)

  1. iris (part of the eye)

Derived terms

  • arc iris

Related terms

  • iridectomia
  • iridi
  • iridià
  • irídic

Further reading

  • “iris” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin īris or Middle French iris (itself from Latin), from Ancient Greek ἶρις (îris).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈiː.rɪs/
  • Hyphenation: iris
  • Homophone: Iris

Noun

iris f (plural irissen, diminutive irisje n)

  1. (anatomy) iris (coloured part of the eye)
    Synonym: regenboogvlies
  2. (botany) iris, plant of the genus Iris

Esperanto

Pronunciation

Verb

iris

  1. past of iri

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin iris, Ancient Greek ἶρις (îris).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /i.ʁis/

Noun

iris m (plural iris)

  1. iris

Derived terms

  • iris d’eau

Further reading

  • “iris” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Ido

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈiris/

Verb

iris

  1. past of irar

Indonesian

Noun

iris (first-person possessive irisku, second-person possessive irismu, third-person possessive irisnya)

  1. slice

Verb

mengiris

  1. to slice

Irish

Etymology 1

From Old Irish iris f (a thong or strap (from which a shield, bag, etc. is suspended)).

Noun

iris f (genitive singular irise, nominative plural irisí)

  1. strap, sling (for carrying)
Declension

Etymology 2

From Old Irish iress (religion, creed, the (true) faith).

Noun

iris f (genitive singular irise)

  1. (literary) belief, faith, religion
Declension
Alternative forms
  • ireas

Etymology 3

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

iris f (genitive singular irise, nominative plural irisí)

  1. Alternative form of oireas
  2. magazine, journal
    Synonym: irisleabhar
  3. gazette
Declension
Derived terms
Related terms
  • iriseoireacht f (journalism)

Etymology 4

Noun

iris m

  1. genitive/vocative singular of ireas (iris)
  2. nominative/dative plural of ireas

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɪɾɪʃ/

Mutation

Further reading

  • “iris” in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “iris”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “ires(s)”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • Entries containing “iris” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “iris” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin iris, Ancient Greek ἶρις (îris).

Noun

iris m or f (invariable)

  1. iris (flower)
    Synonyms: giaggiolo, iride

Anagrams

  • Risi, risi

Latin

Etymology

From Ancient Greek ἶρις (îris)

Noun

īris f (genitive iridis); third declension

  1. rainbow
    • 405, Jerome and others, Vulgate, Revelation 10:1
      et vidi alium angelum fortem descendentem de caelo amictum nube et iris in capite eius et facies eius erat ut sol et pedes eius tamquam columna ignis

Third-declension noun (i-stem).

īrīs

  1. dative/ablative plural of īra

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

Borrowed from Ancient Greek ἶρις (îris, rainbow).

Noun

iris m (definite singular irisen, indefinite plural iriser, definite plural irisene)

  1. (botany) an iris (flower)
  2. (anatomy) an iris (part of the eye)
    Synonym: regnbuehinne

References

  • “iris” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

Borrowed from Ancient Greek ἶρις (îris, rainbow).

Noun

iris m (definite singular irisen, indefinite plural irisar, definite plural irisane)

  1. (botany) an iris (flower)
  2. (anatomy) an iris (part of the eye)
    Synonym: regnbogehinne

References

  • “iris” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old Irish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈirʲisʲ/

Noun

iris

  1. Alternative spelling of iriss: accusative/dative singular of ires

Mutation


Portuguese

Noun

iris f (plural iris)

  1. Obsolete spelling of íris

Romanian

Etymology

Borrowed from French iris, Latin iris, from Ancient Greek ἶρις (îris).

Noun

iris n (plural irisuri)

  1. (anatomy) iris (of the eye)

Declension

Noun

iris n (plural iriși)

  1. (botany) iris (flower)
    Synonyms: stânjenel, stânjen

Declension


Scottish Gaelic

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)
Compare Irish iris.

Noun

iris f (genitive singular irise, plural irisean)

  1. magazine, periodical
    Synonym: ràitheachan

Mutation


Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin iris, Ancient Greek ἶρις (îris).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈiɾis/, [ˈi.ɾis]

Noun

iris m (plural iris or iríses)

  1. (anatomy) iris

Derived terms

  • arco iris
  • músculo dilatador del iris

Related terms

  • íride
  • iridio

Further reading

  • “iris” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

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