flag vs pin what difference

what is difference between flag and pin

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /flæɡ/
  • (North American also) IPA(key): /fleɪɡ/
  • Rhymes: -æɡ, -eɪɡ

Etymology 1

From Middle English flag, flagge (flag), further etymology uncertain. Perhaps from or related to early Middle English flage (name for a baby’s garment) and Old English flagg, flacg (cataplasm, poultice, plaster). Or, perhaps ultimately imitative, or otherwise drawn from Proto-Germanic *flaką (something flat), from Proto-Indo-European *pleh₂- (flat, broad, plain), referring to the shape.

Germanic cognates include Saterland Frisian Flaage (flag), West Frisian flagge (flag), Dutch vlag (flag), German Flagge (flag), Swedish flagg (flag), Danish flag (flag, ship’s flag). Compare also Middle English flacken (to flutter, palpitate), Swedish dialectal flage (to flutter in the wind), Old Norse flögra (to flap about). Akin to Old High German flogarōn (to flutter), Old High German flogezen (to flutter, flicker), Middle English flakeren (to move quickly to and fro), Old English flacor (fluttering, flying). More at flack, flacker.

Noun

flag (countable and uncountable, plural flags)

  1. A piece of cloth, often decorated with an emblem, used as a visual signal or symbol.
  2. An exact representation of a flag (for example: a digital one used in websites).
  3. (nautical) A flag flown by a ship to show the presence on board of the admiral; the admiral himself, or his flagship.
  4. (nautical, often used attributively) A signal flag.
  5. The use of a flag, especially to indicate the start of a race or other event.
  6. (computer science) A variable or memory location that stores a true-or-false, yes-or-no value, typically either recording the fact that a certain event has occurred or requesting that a certain optional action take place.
  7. (computer science) In a command line interface, a command parameter requesting optional behavior or otherwise modifying the action of the command being invoked.
  8. (aviation) A mechanical indicator that pops up to draw the pilot’s attention to a problem or malfunction.
    • 1966, Barry J. Schiff, All about Flying: An Introduction to the World of Flying (page 72)
      I was shooting an IFR approach down the San Francisco slot, when all of a sudden the ILS flag popped up.
    • 1980, Paul Garrison, Flying VFR in marginal weather (page 139)
      [] and then the OFF flag popped up and the needle went dead.
  9. (Britain, uncountable) The game of capture the flag.
  10. (geometry) A sequence of faces of a given polytope, one of each dimension up to that of the polytope (formally, though in practice not always explicitly, including the null face and the polytope itself), such that each face in the sequence is part of the next-higher dimension face.
    • 2002, Peter McMullen, Egon Schulte, Abstract Regular Polytopes, Encyclopedia of Mathematics and Its Applications 92, page 31,
      We call P (combinatorially) regular if its automorphism group Γ(P) is transitive on its flags.
    • 2006, Peter McMullen, Egon Schulte, Regular and Chiral Polytopes in Low Dimensions, Harold Scott Macdonald Coxeter, Chandler Davis, Erich W. Ellers (editors), The Coxeter Legacy: Reflections and Projections, page 91,
      Roughly speaking, chiral polytopes have half as many possible automorphisms as have regular polytopes. More technically, the n-polytope P is chiral if it has two orbits of flags under its group Γ(P), with adjacent flags in different orbits.
  11. (mathematics, linear algebra) A sequence of subspaces of a vector space, beginning with the null space and ending with the vector space itself, such that each member of the sequence (until the last) is a proper subspace of the next.
Synonyms
  • (computer science: true-or-false value): Boolean
  • (computer science: CLI notation): switch, option
  • (geometry: sequence of faces of a polytope): dart
Holonyms
  • (piece of cloth): bunting
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

flag (third-person singular simple present flags, present participle flagging, simple past and past participle flagged)

  1. To furnish or deck out with flags.
  2. To mark with a flag, especially to indicate the importance of something.
  3. (often with down) To signal to, especially to stop a passing vehicle etc.
    Please flag down a taxi for me.
  4. To convey (a message) by means of flag signals.
    to flag an order to troops or vessels at a distance
  5. (often with up) To note, mark or point out for attention.
    I’ve flagged up the need for further investigation into this.
    Users of the Internet forum can flag others’ posts as inappropriate.
  6. (computing) To signal (an event).
    The compiler flagged three errors.
  7. (computing) To set a program variable to true.
    Flag the debug option before running the program.
  8. To decoy (game) by waving a flag, handkerchief, etc. to arouse the animal’s curiosity.
    • 1885, Theodore Roosevelt, Hunting Trips of a Ranchman
      This method of hunting, however, is not so much practised now as formerly, as the antelope are getting continually shyer and more difficult to flag.
  9. (sports) To penalize for an infraction.
  10. (chess) To defeat (an opponent) on time, especially in a blitz game.
  11. (firearms) To point the muzzle of a firearm at a person or object one does not intend to fire on.
Translations

See also

Etymology 2

Perhaps from a variant of flack (to hang loose), from Middle English flacken; or perhaps from Old Norse.. Compare Middle Dutch flaggheren, vlaggheren (to droop, flag).

Verb

flag (third-person singular simple present flags, present participle flagging, simple past and past participle flagged)

  1. (intransitive) To weaken, become feeble.
    His strength flagged toward the end of the race.
    • 1724, Jonathan Swift, Drapier’s Letters, 2
      He now sees a spirit has been raised against him, and he only watches till it begin to flag.
  2. To hang loose without stiffness; to bend down, as flexible bodies; to be loose, yielding, limp.
    • 1817, Thomas Moore, Lalla-Rookh
      as loose it [the sail] flagged around the mast
  3. To let droop; to suffer to fall, or let fall, into feebleness.
    to flag the wings
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Prior to this entry?)
  4. To enervate; to exhaust the vigour or elasticity of.
    • 1670, John Eachard, The Ground and Occasions of the Contempt of the Clergy
      there is nothing that flags the Spirits, disorders the Blood, and enfeebles the whole Body of Man, as intense Studies.
Translations

Etymology 3

Of uncertain origin, perhaps from North Germanic; compare Danish flæg (yellow iris). Or, possibly from sense 1, referring to its motion in the wind. Compare also Dutch vlag.

Noun

flag (plural flags)

  1. Any of various plants with sword-shaped leaves, especially irises; specifically, Iris pseudacorus.
    • ca. 1607, William Shakespeare, Antony and Cleopatra, Act I, sc. 3:
      [T]he ebbed man, ne’er loved till ne’er worth love,
      Comes deared by being lacked. This common body,
      Like to a vagabond flag upon the stream,
      Goes to and back, lackeying the varying tide,
      To rot itself with motion.
    • 1611, King James Version, Job 8:11:
      Can the rush grow up without mire? can the flag grow without water?
    • before 1899, Robert Seymour Bridges, There is a Hill:
      And laden barges float
      By banks of myosote;
      And scented flag and golden flower-de-lys
      Delay the loitering boat.
Derived terms
  • sweet flag
Translations

Etymology 4

Probably of Scandinavian/North Germanic origin; compare Icelandic flag.

Noun

flag (plural flags)

  1. (obsolete except in dialects) A slice of turf; a sod.
  2. A slab of stone; a flagstone, a flat piece of stone used for paving.
  3. (geology) Any hard, evenly stratified sandstone, which splits into layers suitable for flagstones.
Translations

Verb

flag (third-person singular simple present flags, present participle flagging, simple past and past participle flagged)

  1. (transitive) To pave with flagstones.
    Fred is planning to flag his patio this weekend.
Translations

Etymology 5

Noun

flag (plural flags)

  1. A group of feathers on the lower part of the legs of certain hawks, owls, etc.
  2. A group of elongated wing feathers in certain hawks.
  3. The bushy tail of a dog such as a setter.
  4. (music) A hook attached to the stem of a written note that assigns its rhythmic value

References


Chinese

Etymology

Borrowed from Japanese フラグ, from English flag.

Definitions

flag

  1. (Internet slang, ACG) A plot or words of a character in an animation, etc., that would usually lead to a specific outcome or event, not logically or causally, but as a pattern of the animation, etc., for example the words like “I will stop doing evil after this one last job” from a character, who usually would not survive the “job”. Also figurative.
    死亡flag  ―  sǐwáng flag  ―  the words of a character which, as a pattern, usually follows the character’s death
  2. goal; resolution; statement of intent
    新年flag  ―  xīnnián flag  ―  New Year resolutions
    flag  ―  flag  ―  to set up a goal
    他的flag倒了。  ―  Tāde flag dǎole.  ―  He didn’t achieve the goal.
    • 很多同學立了flag要好好備考,然而好的學習方法能起到事半功倍的效果。 [MSC, trad.]
      很多同学立了flag要好好备考,然而好的学习方法能起到事半功倍的效果。 [MSC, simp.]

      From: 2020 April 11, “雅思中国网” (username), Weibo post
      Hěnduō tóngxué lìle flag yào hǎohǎo bèikǎo, rán’ér hǎode xuéxí fāngfǎ néng qǐdào shìbàngōngbèi de xiàoguǒ. [Pinyin]
      Many students stated there resolution to study hard for the test, and a good way to study can yield twice the result with half the effort.
    • “這輩子不打工”的flag就先擱置吧。 [MSC, trad.]
      “这辈子不打工”的flag就先搁置吧。 [MSC, simp.]

      From: 2020 April 11, The Beijing News, “Internet Celebrity Theif to be Released: Put Aside For Now the Resolution to “Not Get Employed Forever””
      “zhè bèizǐ bù dǎgōng” de flag jiù xiān gēzhì ba. [Pinyin]
      Put aside for now the resolution to “not get employed forever”.

Danish

Etymology

From Dutch or English flag

Noun

flag n (singular definite flaget, plural indefinite flag)

  1. flag (cloth)
  2. flag (true-false variable)

Inflection

Verb

flag

  1. imperative of flage

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English flag.

Pronunciation

  • (Netherlands) IPA(key): /flɛɡ/
  • Hyphenation: flag

Noun

flag m (plural flags, diminutive flagje n)

  1. (computing) flag

Icelandic

Etymology

From Old Norse flag, flaga, probably from Proto-Germanic *flaką (something flat), from Proto-Indo-European *pleh₂- (flat, broad, plain). However, compare Proto-Germanic *plaggą.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /flaːɣ/
  • Rhymes: -aːɣ

Noun

flag n (genitive singular flags, nominative plural flög)

  1. area of ground stripped of turf

Declension

Related terms

  • flaga

References


Portuguese

Etymology

From English flag.

Noun

flag m or f (in variation) (plural flags)

  1. (programming) flag (true-or-false variable)
    Synonym: booleano


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: pĭn, IPA(key): /pɪn/, [pʰɪn]
  • Rhymes: -ɪn
  • Homophone: pen (pin-pen merger)

Etymology 1

From Middle English pinne, from Old English pinn (pin, peg, bolt), from Proto-Germanic *pinnaz, *pinnō, *pint- (protruding point, peak, peg, pin, nail), from Proto-Indo-European *bend- (protruding object, pointed peg, nail, edge).

Cognate with Dutch pin (peg, pin), Low German pin, pinne (pin, point, nail, peg), German Pinn, Pinne (pin, tack, peg), Bavarian Pfonzer, Pfunzer (sharpened point), Danish pind (pin, pointed stick), Norwegian pinn (stick), Swedish pinne (peg, rod, stick), Icelandic pinni (pin). More at pintle.

No relation to classical Latin pinna (fin, flipper, wing-like appendage, wing, feather), which was extended to mean “ridge, peak, point” (compare pinnacle), and often confused with Latin penna (wing, feather). More at feather.

Noun

pin (plural pins)

  1. A needle without an eye (usually) made of drawn-out steel wire with one end sharpened and the other flattened or rounded into a head, used for fastening.
  2. A small nail with a head and a sharp point.
  3. A cylinder often of wood or metal used to fasten or as a bearing between two parts.
  4. (wrestling, professional wrestling) The victory condition of holding the opponent’s shoulders on the wrestling mat for a prescribed period of time.
  5. A slender object specially designed for use in a specific game or sport, such as skittles or bowling.
  6. (informal, in the plural) A leg.
  7. (electricity) Any of the individual connecting elements of a multipole electrical connector.
  8. A piece of jewellery that is attached to clothing with a pin.
  9. (US) A simple accessory that can be attached to clothing with a pin or fastener, often round and bearing a design, logo or message, and used for decoration, identification or to show political affiliation, etc.
    Synonyms: lapel pin, badge
  10. (chess) A scenario in which moving a lesser piece to escape from attack would expose a more valuable piece to attack.
  11. (golf) The flagstick: the flag-bearing pole which marks the location of a hole
  12. (curling) The spot at the exact centre of the house (the target area)
  13. (dated) A mood, a state of being.
    • 1653, Henry More, An Antidote Against Atheism
      he had made the sign of the Cross on his head; for he was then on a merry pin and full of jearing
  14. One of a row of pegs in the side of an ancient drinking cup to mark how much each person should drink.
  15. (medicine, obsolete) Caligo.
  16. A thing of small value; a trifle.
    • He [] did not care a pin for her.
  17. A peg in musical instruments for increasing or relaxing the tension of the strings.
  18. (engineering) A short shaft, sometimes forming a bolt, a part of which serves as a journal.
  19. The tenon of a dovetail joint.
  20. (Britain, brewing) A size of brewery cask, equal to half a firkin, or eighth of a barrel.
  21. (informal) A pinball machine.
    • 1949, Billboard (volume 61, page 82)
      Attracted by game operation, many invested heavily in pins and rolldowns prior to last spring.
Synonyms
  • (small nail): nail, tack
  • (cylinder of wood or metal): peg
  • (games): skittle
  • (jewellery fastened with a pin): brooch
Hyponyms
  • (jewellery fastened with a pin): breastpin
  • (chess): absolute pin, relative pin, partial pin
Derived terms
Translations
See also
  • needle

Verb

pin (third-person singular simple present pins, present participle pinning, simple past and past participle pinned)

  1. (often followed by a preposition such as “to” or “on”) To fasten or attach (something) with a pin.
  2. (chess, usually passive) To cause (a piece) to be in a pin.
  3. (wrestling) To pin down (someone).
    He pinned his opponent on the mat.
  4. To enclose; to confine; to pen; to pound.
  5. (computing, graphical user interface, transitive) To attach (an icon, application, message etc.) to another item so that it persists.
  6. (computing, transitive) To fix (an array in memory, a security certificate, etc.) so that it cannot be modified.
  7. To cause an analog gauge to reach the stop pin at the high end of the range.
    Synonym: peg
    • 1979, Al Greenwood and Lou Gramm, “Rev on the Red Line” from Head Games:
      Now I need to pin those needles.
Derived terms
  • pin down
  • pin in
  • pin on
  • pin the meter
  • pin the tail on the donkey
  • pin up
  • underpin
Translations

Etymology 2

Verb

pin (third-person singular simple present pins, present participle pinning, simple past and past participle pinned)

  1. Alternative form of peen

Anagrams

  • NIP, NPI, Nip, nip

Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈpin/

Noun

pin m (plural pins)

  1. (electronics) lead
  2. pin (ornament)

Chuukese

Adjective

pin

  1. holy

Synonyms

  • fen

Cimbrian

Verb

pin

  1. first-person singular present indicative of zèinan: am

Cornish

Noun

pin f (singulative pinen)

  1. pines

Synonyms

  • sab

Danish

Verb

pin

  1. imperative of pine

Dutch

Etymology 1

From Proto-Germanic *pinnaz *pinnaz, *pinnō, *pint- (protruding point, peak, peg, pin, nail), from Proto-Indo-European *bend- ‘protruding object, pointed peg, nail, edge’. Cognate with English pin, Low German pin, pinne (pin, point, nail, peg), German Pinn, Pinne (pin, tack, peg), Bavarian Pfonzer, Pfunzer (sharpened point), Danish pind (pin, pointed stick), Norwegian pinn (stick), Swedish pinne (peg, rod, stick), Icelandic pinni (pin).

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɪn
  • IPA(key): /pɪn/

Noun

pin f (plural pinnen, diminutive pinnetje n)

  1. peg, pin

Etymology 2

Abbreviation

Noun

pin

  1. Abbreviation of persoonlijk identificatienummer.

Etymology 3

Verb

pin

  1. first-person singular present indicative of pinnen
  2. imperative of pinnen

Anagrams

  • nip

French

Etymology

From Old French pin, from Latin pīnus, ultimately from a derivative of Proto-Indo-European *poi- (sap, juice).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɛ̃/
  • Homophones: pain, pains, peins, peint, peints, pins

Noun

pin m (plural pins)

  1. pine, pine tree

Derived terms

  • noix de pin
  • pin de Briançon
  • pomme de pin

Further reading

  • “pin” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Friulian

Etymology

From Latin pīnus.

Noun

pin m (plural pins)

  1. pine tree

Indonesian

Etymology

From Dutch pin, from Proto-Germanic *pinnaz *pinnaz, *pinnō, *pint- (protruding point, peak, peg, pin, nail), from Proto-Indo-European *bend- ‘protruding object, pointed peg, nail, edge’.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈpɪn]
  • Hyphenation: pin

Noun

pin

  1. pin
    1. (colloquial) a needle without an eye (usually) made of drawn-out steel wire with one end sharpened and the other flattened or rounded into a head, used for fastening.
      Synonym: peniti
    2. a slender object specially designed for use in a specific game or sport, such as skittles or bowling.
  2. (colloquial) peg.
    Synonym: pasak

Further reading

  • “pin” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Japanese

Romanization

pin

  1. Rōmaji transcription of ピン

Latvian

Verb

pin

  1. 2nd person singular present indicative form of pīt
  2. 3rd person singular present indicative form of pīt
  3. 3rd person plural present indicative form of pīt
  4. 2nd person singular imperative form of pīt
  5. (with the particle lai) 3rd person singular imperative form of pīt
  6. (with the particle lai) 3rd person plural imperative form of pīt

Mandarin

Romanization

pin

  1. Nonstandard spelling of pīn.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of pín.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of pǐn.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of pìn.

Usage notes

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Mapudungun

Verb

pin (Raguileo spelling)

  1. To say
  2. To tell (a story).
  3. first-person singular realis form of pin

Synonyms

  • (tell a story): nvxamyen

Ojibwe

Noun

pin anim (plural piniig, diminutive piniins, locative piniing, pejorative pinish)

  1. potato

Papantla Totonac

Noun

pin inan

  1. chili. chili pepper.

References

  • Crescencio García Ramos, Diccionario Básico Totonaco-Español Español-Totonaco (Xalapa, Academia Veracruzana de las Lenguas Indígenas, 2007)

Rawang

Etymology

Compare Chinese (bīng).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pʰin˧/

Noun

pin

  1. army.
  2. soldier.

Synonyms

  • (army): dap, pindap, sìl
  • (soldier): pinla, sìlsè

Romanian

Etymology

From Latin pīnus, ultimately from a derivative of Proto-Indo-European *poi- (sap, juice).

Noun

pin m (plural pini)

  1. pine

Declension

See also

  • brad

Romansch

Alternative forms

  • (Rumantsch Grischun) pign
  • (Sursilvan) pégn
  • (Sutsilvan, Surmiran) pegn

Etymology

From Latin pīnus.

Noun

pin m

  1. (Puter, Vallader) spruce, fir

Synonyms

  • (spruce): (Vallader) petsch

Seta

Noun

pin

  1. woman

References

  • transnewguinea.org, citing D. C. Laycock, Languages of the Lumi Subdistrict (West Sepik District), New Guinea (1968), Oceanic Linguistics, 7 (1): 36-66

Spanish

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English pin

Noun

pin m (plural pines)

  1. pin, lapel pin, badge
    Synonym: insignia
  2. (electricity) pin (any of the individual connecting elements of a multipole electrical connector)

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English PIN, acronym of personal identification number

Alternative forms

  • PIN

Noun

pin m (plural pines)

  1. PIN, PIN number
    Synonym: número pin

Swedish

Etymology 1

Clipping of pinsam, with the same meaning.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpiːn/

Adjective

pin (comparative mer pin, superlative mest pin)

  1. (colloquial) embarrasing
Declension

Invariable, not used in the definite form.

Etymology 2

From pina.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpiːn/

Noun

pin

  1. pain, torment
Derived terms
  • om man vill vara fin, får man lida pin; vill man vara fin, får man lida pin

Adverb

pin (not comparable)

  1. (colloquial) very, really, super-
    Synonyms: jätte-, väldigt
Derived terms
  • på pin kiv

Etymology 3

Borrowed from English pin.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɪn/

Noun

pin n

  1. Alternative form of pins
Usage notes

The form with -s is recommended since it’s easier to decline in Swedish.

References

  • pin in Nationalencyklopedin (needs an authorization fee).


Turkish

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Ottoman Turkish پین(pin), borrowed from a dialectal form of Armenian բույն (buyn, nest).

Noun

pin (definite accusative pini, plural pinler)

  1. (dialectal) coop for poultry

Declension

Synonyms

  • kümes

References

  • Ačaṙean, Hračʿeay (1971–1979), “բոյն”, in Hayerēn armatakan baṙaran [Dictionary of Armenian Root Words] (in Armenian), 2nd edition, reprint of the original 1926–1935 seven-volume edition, Yerevan: University Press
  • pin”, in Türkiye’de halk ağzından derleme sözlüğü [Compilation Dictionary of Popular Speech in Turkey] (in Turkish), Ankara: Türk Dil Kurumu, 1963–1982

Vietnamese

Etymology

Borrowed from French pile.

Pronunciation

  • (Hà Nội) IPA(key): [pin˧˧]
  • (Huế) IPA(key): [pin˧˧]
  • (Hồ Chí Minh City) IPA(key): [pɨn˧˧]

Noun

(classifier cục) pin

  1. a battery
  2. the amount of electricity that a battery holds

Derived terms

  • đèn pin (torch, flashlight)

Welsh

Etymology 1

From Latin pīnus (compare Middle Irish pín).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /piːn/

Noun

pin m or m pl (uncountable)

  1. pine (tree)
  2. pine (wood)
Usage notes

Modern Welsh orthography prefers the form pin to the superseded form pîn.

Synonyms
  • pinwydd f pl

Derived terms

  • pin-afal

Etymology 2

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɪn/

Noun

pin m (plural pinnau)

  1. Superseded spelling of pìn.
Usage notes

Modern Welsh orthography uses pìn instead of the superseded form pin.

Mutation

References

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “pin”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

Yapese

Etymology

From Proto-Oceanic *papine, from Proto-Austronesian *bahi (woman).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɪn/

Noun

pin

  1. woman

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