flag vs sag what difference

what is difference between flag and sag

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /flæɡ/
  • (North American also) IPA(key): /fleɪɡ/
  • Rhymes: -æɡ, -eɪɡ

Etymology 1

From Middle English flag, flagge (flag), further etymology uncertain. Perhaps from or related to early Middle English flage (name for a baby’s garment) and Old English flagg, flacg (cataplasm, poultice, plaster). Or, perhaps ultimately imitative, or otherwise drawn from Proto-Germanic *flaką (something flat), from Proto-Indo-European *pleh₂- (flat, broad, plain), referring to the shape.

Germanic cognates include Saterland Frisian Flaage (flag), West Frisian flagge (flag), Dutch vlag (flag), German Flagge (flag), Swedish flagg (flag), Danish flag (flag, ship’s flag). Compare also Middle English flacken (to flutter, palpitate), Swedish dialectal flage (to flutter in the wind), Old Norse flögra (to flap about). Akin to Old High German flogarōn (to flutter), Old High German flogezen (to flutter, flicker), Middle English flakeren (to move quickly to and fro), Old English flacor (fluttering, flying). More at flack, flacker.

Noun

flag (countable and uncountable, plural flags)

  1. A piece of cloth, often decorated with an emblem, used as a visual signal or symbol.
  2. An exact representation of a flag (for example: a digital one used in websites).
  3. (nautical) A flag flown by a ship to show the presence on board of the admiral; the admiral himself, or his flagship.
  4. (nautical, often used attributively) A signal flag.
  5. The use of a flag, especially to indicate the start of a race or other event.
  6. (computer science) A variable or memory location that stores a true-or-false, yes-or-no value, typically either recording the fact that a certain event has occurred or requesting that a certain optional action take place.
  7. (computer science) In a command line interface, a command parameter requesting optional behavior or otherwise modifying the action of the command being invoked.
  8. (aviation) A mechanical indicator that pops up to draw the pilot’s attention to a problem or malfunction.
    • 1966, Barry J. Schiff, All about Flying: An Introduction to the World of Flying (page 72)
      I was shooting an IFR approach down the San Francisco slot, when all of a sudden the ILS flag popped up.
    • 1980, Paul Garrison, Flying VFR in marginal weather (page 139)
      [] and then the OFF flag popped up and the needle went dead.
  9. (Britain, uncountable) The game of capture the flag.
  10. (geometry) A sequence of faces of a given polytope, one of each dimension up to that of the polytope (formally, though in practice not always explicitly, including the null face and the polytope itself), such that each face in the sequence is part of the next-higher dimension face.
    • 2002, Peter McMullen, Egon Schulte, Abstract Regular Polytopes, Encyclopedia of Mathematics and Its Applications 92, page 31,
      We call P (combinatorially) regular if its automorphism group Γ(P) is transitive on its flags.
    • 2006, Peter McMullen, Egon Schulte, Regular and Chiral Polytopes in Low Dimensions, Harold Scott Macdonald Coxeter, Chandler Davis, Erich W. Ellers (editors), The Coxeter Legacy: Reflections and Projections, page 91,
      Roughly speaking, chiral polytopes have half as many possible automorphisms as have regular polytopes. More technically, the n-polytope P is chiral if it has two orbits of flags under its group Γ(P), with adjacent flags in different orbits.
  11. (mathematics, linear algebra) A sequence of subspaces of a vector space, beginning with the null space and ending with the vector space itself, such that each member of the sequence (until the last) is a proper subspace of the next.
Synonyms
  • (computer science: true-or-false value): Boolean
  • (computer science: CLI notation): switch, option
  • (geometry: sequence of faces of a polytope): dart
Holonyms
  • (piece of cloth): bunting
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

flag (third-person singular simple present flags, present participle flagging, simple past and past participle flagged)

  1. To furnish or deck out with flags.
  2. To mark with a flag, especially to indicate the importance of something.
  3. (often with down) To signal to, especially to stop a passing vehicle etc.
    Please flag down a taxi for me.
  4. To convey (a message) by means of flag signals.
    to flag an order to troops or vessels at a distance
  5. (often with up) To note, mark or point out for attention.
    I’ve flagged up the need for further investigation into this.
    Users of the Internet forum can flag others’ posts as inappropriate.
  6. (computing) To signal (an event).
    The compiler flagged three errors.
  7. (computing) To set a program variable to true.
    Flag the debug option before running the program.
  8. To decoy (game) by waving a flag, handkerchief, etc. to arouse the animal’s curiosity.
    • 1885, Theodore Roosevelt, Hunting Trips of a Ranchman
      This method of hunting, however, is not so much practised now as formerly, as the antelope are getting continually shyer and more difficult to flag.
  9. (sports) To penalize for an infraction.
  10. (chess) To defeat (an opponent) on time, especially in a blitz game.
  11. (firearms) To point the muzzle of a firearm at a person or object one does not intend to fire on.
Translations

See also

Etymology 2

Perhaps from a variant of flack (to hang loose), from Middle English flacken; or perhaps from Old Norse.. Compare Middle Dutch flaggheren, vlaggheren (to droop, flag).

Verb

flag (third-person singular simple present flags, present participle flagging, simple past and past participle flagged)

  1. (intransitive) To weaken, become feeble.
    His strength flagged toward the end of the race.
    • 1724, Jonathan Swift, Drapier’s Letters, 2
      He now sees a spirit has been raised against him, and he only watches till it begin to flag.
  2. To hang loose without stiffness; to bend down, as flexible bodies; to be loose, yielding, limp.
    • 1817, Thomas Moore, Lalla-Rookh
      as loose it [the sail] flagged around the mast
  3. To let droop; to suffer to fall, or let fall, into feebleness.
    to flag the wings
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Prior to this entry?)
  4. To enervate; to exhaust the vigour or elasticity of.
    • 1670, John Eachard, The Ground and Occasions of the Contempt of the Clergy
      there is nothing that flags the Spirits, disorders the Blood, and enfeebles the whole Body of Man, as intense Studies.
Translations

Etymology 3

Of uncertain origin, perhaps from North Germanic; compare Danish flæg (yellow iris). Or, possibly from sense 1, referring to its motion in the wind. Compare also Dutch vlag.

Noun

flag (plural flags)

  1. Any of various plants with sword-shaped leaves, especially irises; specifically, Iris pseudacorus.
    • ca. 1607, William Shakespeare, Antony and Cleopatra, Act I, sc. 3:
      [T]he ebbed man, ne’er loved till ne’er worth love,
      Comes deared by being lacked. This common body,
      Like to a vagabond flag upon the stream,
      Goes to and back, lackeying the varying tide,
      To rot itself with motion.
    • 1611, King James Version, Job 8:11:
      Can the rush grow up without mire? can the flag grow without water?
    • before 1899, Robert Seymour Bridges, There is a Hill:
      And laden barges float
      By banks of myosote;
      And scented flag and golden flower-de-lys
      Delay the loitering boat.
Derived terms
  • sweet flag
Translations

Etymology 4

Probably of Scandinavian/North Germanic origin; compare Icelandic flag.

Noun

flag (plural flags)

  1. (obsolete except in dialects) A slice of turf; a sod.
  2. A slab of stone; a flagstone, a flat piece of stone used for paving.
  3. (geology) Any hard, evenly stratified sandstone, which splits into layers suitable for flagstones.
Translations

Verb

flag (third-person singular simple present flags, present participle flagging, simple past and past participle flagged)

  1. (transitive) To pave with flagstones.
    Fred is planning to flag his patio this weekend.
Translations

Etymology 5

Noun

flag (plural flags)

  1. A group of feathers on the lower part of the legs of certain hawks, owls, etc.
  2. A group of elongated wing feathers in certain hawks.
  3. The bushy tail of a dog such as a setter.
  4. (music) A hook attached to the stem of a written note that assigns its rhythmic value

References


Chinese

Etymology

Borrowed from Japanese フラグ, from English flag.

Definitions

flag

  1. (Internet slang, ACG) A plot or words of a character in an animation, etc., that would usually lead to a specific outcome or event, not logically or causally, but as a pattern of the animation, etc., for example the words like “I will stop doing evil after this one last job” from a character, who usually would not survive the “job”. Also figurative.
    死亡flag  ―  sǐwáng flag  ―  the words of a character which, as a pattern, usually follows the character’s death
  2. goal; resolution; statement of intent
    新年flag  ―  xīnnián flag  ―  New Year resolutions
    flag  ―  flag  ―  to set up a goal
    他的flag倒了。  ―  Tāde flag dǎole.  ―  He didn’t achieve the goal.
    • 很多同學立了flag要好好備考,然而好的學習方法能起到事半功倍的效果。 [MSC, trad.]
      很多同学立了flag要好好备考,然而好的学习方法能起到事半功倍的效果。 [MSC, simp.]

      From: 2020 April 11, “雅思中国网” (username), Weibo post
      Hěnduō tóngxué lìle flag yào hǎohǎo bèikǎo, rán’ér hǎode xuéxí fāngfǎ néng qǐdào shìbàngōngbèi de xiàoguǒ. [Pinyin]
      Many students stated there resolution to study hard for the test, and a good way to study can yield twice the result with half the effort.
    • “這輩子不打工”的flag就先擱置吧。 [MSC, trad.]
      “这辈子不打工”的flag就先搁置吧。 [MSC, simp.]

      From: 2020 April 11, The Beijing News, “Internet Celebrity Theif to be Released: Put Aside For Now the Resolution to “Not Get Employed Forever””
      “zhè bèizǐ bù dǎgōng” de flag jiù xiān gēzhì ba. [Pinyin]
      Put aside for now the resolution to “not get employed forever”.

Danish

Etymology

From Dutch or English flag

Noun

flag n (singular definite flaget, plural indefinite flag)

  1. flag (cloth)
  2. flag (true-false variable)

Inflection

Verb

flag

  1. imperative of flage

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English flag.

Pronunciation

  • (Netherlands) IPA(key): /flɛɡ/
  • Hyphenation: flag

Noun

flag m (plural flags, diminutive flagje n)

  1. (computing) flag

Icelandic

Etymology

From Old Norse flag, flaga, probably from Proto-Germanic *flaką (something flat), from Proto-Indo-European *pleh₂- (flat, broad, plain). However, compare Proto-Germanic *plaggą.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /flaːɣ/
  • Rhymes: -aːɣ

Noun

flag n (genitive singular flags, nominative plural flög)

  1. area of ground stripped of turf

Declension

Related terms

  • flaga

References


Portuguese

Etymology

From English flag.

Noun

flag m or f (in variation) (plural flags)

  1. (programming) flag (true-or-false variable)
    Synonym: booleano


English

Etymology 1

From late Middle English saggen, probably of Scandinavian/Old Norse origin (compare Norwegian Nynorsk sagga (move slowly)); probably akin to Danish and Norwegian sakke, Swedish sacka, Icelandic sakka, Old Norse sokkva. Compare also Dutch zakken and German sacken (from Low German).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: săg, IPA(key): /sæɡ/
  • Rhymes: -æɡ

Noun

sag (countable and uncountable, plural sags)

  1. The state of sinking or bending; a droop.
  2. The difference in elevation of a wire, cable, chain or rope suspended between two consecutive points.
  3. The difference in height or depth between the vertex and the rim of a curved surface, specifically used for optical elements such as a mirror or lens.
Translations

Verb

sag (third-person singular simple present sags, present participle sagging, simple past and past participle sagged)

  1. To sink, in the middle, by its weight or under applied pressure, below a horizontal line or plane.
  2. (by extension) To lean, give way, or settle from a vertical position.
  3. (figuratively) To lose firmness, elasticity, vigor, or a thriving state; to sink; to droop; to flag; to bend; to yield, as the mind or spirits, under the pressure of care, trouble, doubt, or the like; to be unsettled or unbalanced.
  4. To loiter in walking; to idle along; to drag or droop heavily.
  5. (transitive) To cause to bend or give way; to load.
  6. (informal) To wear one’s trousers so that their top is well below the waist.
  7. (informal, Canada) To pull down someone else’s pants.
Quotations
  • For quotations using this term, see Citations:sag.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

Noun

sag (uncountable)

  1. Alternative form of saag
    • 2003, Charles Campion, The Rough Guide to London Restaurants (page 173)
      The dal tarka (£5) is made from whole yellow split peas, while sag aloo (£5) brings potatoes in a rich and oily spinach puree.

Anagrams

  • AGS, AGs, Ags., GAs, GSA, Gas, SGA, gas

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch zacht.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /saχ/, [säχ], [sɐχ]

Adjective

sag (attributive sagte, comparative sagter, superlative sagste)

  1. soft

Danish

Etymology

From Old Danish sak, from Old Norse sǫk, from Proto-Germanic *sakō. Cognate with Swedish sak, Icelandic sök, English sake, Dutch zaak, German Sache.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /saːɡ/, [sæːˀj]
  • Rhymes: -aːɡ

Noun

sag c (singular definite sagen, plural indefinite sager)

  1. matter, affair
    Jeg er ikke bekendt med alle sagens detaljer.

    I am not acquainted with all the details of the matter.
  2. cause
    Jeg er villig til at dø for sagen.

    I am willing to die for the cause.
  3. thing
    Jeg går lige ind og pakker mine sager ud.

    I’ll go inside and pack out my things.
  4. case, lawsuit
    Den 27-årige nægtede sig skyldig i spritkørsel, så sagen måtte udsættes.

    The 27-year-old pleaded not guilty to drunk driving, so the case had to be adjourned.
  5. file
    Jeg tog mine papirer og sager med mig hjem.

    I took my papers and cases home with me.
  6. food (only in plural)
    Tjeneren var ved at stable en masse lækre sager op på bordet.

    The waiter was stacking a lot of delicious things on the table.

Inflection

Synonyms

  • (legal case): retssag

Faroese

Etymology

From Old Norse sǫg, from Proto-Germanic *sagō, from Proto-Indo-European *sek- (to cut).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɛaː/
  • Homophone: sæð

Noun

sag f (genitive singular sagar, plural sagir)

  1. saw; a tool with a toothed blade used for cutting hard substances, in particular wood or metal

Declension

Related terms

  • sagarblað
  • sagarmaður
  • sagartonn

German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /zaːk/ (standard)
  • IPA(key): /zax/ (northern and central Germany; very common)
  • Rhymes: -aːk, -ax

Verb

sag

  1. singular imperative of sagen
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of sagen

Icelandic

Etymology

From the verb saga (to saw).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /saːɣ/
  • Rhymes: -aːɣ

Noun

sag n (genitive singular sags, no plural)

  1. sawdust

Declension

Anagrams

  • gas

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From Old Norse sǫg, from Proto-Germanic *sagō, from Proto-Indo-European *sek- (to cut).

Noun

sag f or m (definite singular saga or sagen, indefinite plural sager, definite plural sagene)

  1. (tools) a saw
  2. sawmill
Derived terms

Etymology 2

Verb

sag

  1. imperative of sage

References

  • “sag” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse sǫg

Noun

sag f (definite singular saga, indefinite plural sager, definite plural sagene)

  1. (tools) a saw

Derived terms

References

  • “sag” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From Latin sagum.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sâːɡ/

Noun

sȃg m (Cyrillic spelling са̑г)

  1. carpet, rug

Declension

Synonyms

  • tèpih

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