flag vs swag what difference

what is difference between flag and swag

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /flæɡ/
  • (North American also) IPA(key): /fleɪɡ/
  • Rhymes: -æɡ, -eɪɡ

Etymology 1

From Middle English flag, flagge (flag), further etymology uncertain. Perhaps from or related to early Middle English flage (name for a baby’s garment) and Old English flagg, flacg (cataplasm, poultice, plaster). Or, perhaps ultimately imitative, or otherwise drawn from Proto-Germanic *flaką (something flat), from Proto-Indo-European *pleh₂- (flat, broad, plain), referring to the shape.

Germanic cognates include Saterland Frisian Flaage (flag), West Frisian flagge (flag), Dutch vlag (flag), German Flagge (flag), Swedish flagg (flag), Danish flag (flag, ship’s flag). Compare also Middle English flacken (to flutter, palpitate), Swedish dialectal flage (to flutter in the wind), Old Norse flögra (to flap about). Akin to Old High German flogarōn (to flutter), Old High German flogezen (to flutter, flicker), Middle English flakeren (to move quickly to and fro), Old English flacor (fluttering, flying). More at flack, flacker.

Noun

flag (countable and uncountable, plural flags)

  1. A piece of cloth, often decorated with an emblem, used as a visual signal or symbol.
  2. An exact representation of a flag (for example: a digital one used in websites).
  3. (nautical) A flag flown by a ship to show the presence on board of the admiral; the admiral himself, or his flagship.
  4. (nautical, often used attributively) A signal flag.
  5. The use of a flag, especially to indicate the start of a race or other event.
  6. (computer science) A variable or memory location that stores a true-or-false, yes-or-no value, typically either recording the fact that a certain event has occurred or requesting that a certain optional action take place.
  7. (computer science) In a command line interface, a command parameter requesting optional behavior or otherwise modifying the action of the command being invoked.
  8. (aviation) A mechanical indicator that pops up to draw the pilot’s attention to a problem or malfunction.
    • 1966, Barry J. Schiff, All about Flying: An Introduction to the World of Flying (page 72)
      I was shooting an IFR approach down the San Francisco slot, when all of a sudden the ILS flag popped up.
    • 1980, Paul Garrison, Flying VFR in marginal weather (page 139)
      [] and then the OFF flag popped up and the needle went dead.
  9. (Britain, uncountable) The game of capture the flag.
  10. (geometry) A sequence of faces of a given polytope, one of each dimension up to that of the polytope (formally, though in practice not always explicitly, including the null face and the polytope itself), such that each face in the sequence is part of the next-higher dimension face.
    • 2002, Peter McMullen, Egon Schulte, Abstract Regular Polytopes, Encyclopedia of Mathematics and Its Applications 92, page 31,
      We call P (combinatorially) regular if its automorphism group Γ(P) is transitive on its flags.
    • 2006, Peter McMullen, Egon Schulte, Regular and Chiral Polytopes in Low Dimensions, Harold Scott Macdonald Coxeter, Chandler Davis, Erich W. Ellers (editors), The Coxeter Legacy: Reflections and Projections, page 91,
      Roughly speaking, chiral polytopes have half as many possible automorphisms as have regular polytopes. More technically, the n-polytope P is chiral if it has two orbits of flags under its group Γ(P), with adjacent flags in different orbits.
  11. (mathematics, linear algebra) A sequence of subspaces of a vector space, beginning with the null space and ending with the vector space itself, such that each member of the sequence (until the last) is a proper subspace of the next.
Synonyms
  • (computer science: true-or-false value): Boolean
  • (computer science: CLI notation): switch, option
  • (geometry: sequence of faces of a polytope): dart
Holonyms
  • (piece of cloth): bunting
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

flag (third-person singular simple present flags, present participle flagging, simple past and past participle flagged)

  1. To furnish or deck out with flags.
  2. To mark with a flag, especially to indicate the importance of something.
  3. (often with down) To signal to, especially to stop a passing vehicle etc.
    Please flag down a taxi for me.
  4. To convey (a message) by means of flag signals.
    to flag an order to troops or vessels at a distance
  5. (often with up) To note, mark or point out for attention.
    I’ve flagged up the need for further investigation into this.
    Users of the Internet forum can flag others’ posts as inappropriate.
  6. (computing) To signal (an event).
    The compiler flagged three errors.
  7. (computing) To set a program variable to true.
    Flag the debug option before running the program.
  8. To decoy (game) by waving a flag, handkerchief, etc. to arouse the animal’s curiosity.
    • 1885, Theodore Roosevelt, Hunting Trips of a Ranchman
      This method of hunting, however, is not so much practised now as formerly, as the antelope are getting continually shyer and more difficult to flag.
  9. (sports) To penalize for an infraction.
  10. (chess) To defeat (an opponent) on time, especially in a blitz game.
  11. (firearms) To point the muzzle of a firearm at a person or object one does not intend to fire on.
Translations

See also

Etymology 2

Perhaps from a variant of flack (to hang loose), from Middle English flacken; or perhaps from Old Norse.. Compare Middle Dutch flaggheren, vlaggheren (to droop, flag).

Verb

flag (third-person singular simple present flags, present participle flagging, simple past and past participle flagged)

  1. (intransitive) To weaken, become feeble.
    His strength flagged toward the end of the race.
    • 1724, Jonathan Swift, Drapier’s Letters, 2
      He now sees a spirit has been raised against him, and he only watches till it begin to flag.
  2. To hang loose without stiffness; to bend down, as flexible bodies; to be loose, yielding, limp.
    • 1817, Thomas Moore, Lalla-Rookh
      as loose it [the sail] flagged around the mast
  3. To let droop; to suffer to fall, or let fall, into feebleness.
    to flag the wings
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Prior to this entry?)
  4. To enervate; to exhaust the vigour or elasticity of.
    • 1670, John Eachard, The Ground and Occasions of the Contempt of the Clergy
      there is nothing that flags the Spirits, disorders the Blood, and enfeebles the whole Body of Man, as intense Studies.
Translations

Etymology 3

Of uncertain origin, perhaps from North Germanic; compare Danish flæg (yellow iris). Or, possibly from sense 1, referring to its motion in the wind. Compare also Dutch vlag.

Noun

flag (plural flags)

  1. Any of various plants with sword-shaped leaves, especially irises; specifically, Iris pseudacorus.
    • ca. 1607, William Shakespeare, Antony and Cleopatra, Act I, sc. 3:
      [T]he ebbed man, ne’er loved till ne’er worth love,
      Comes deared by being lacked. This common body,
      Like to a vagabond flag upon the stream,
      Goes to and back, lackeying the varying tide,
      To rot itself with motion.
    • 1611, King James Version, Job 8:11:
      Can the rush grow up without mire? can the flag grow without water?
    • before 1899, Robert Seymour Bridges, There is a Hill:
      And laden barges float
      By banks of myosote;
      And scented flag and golden flower-de-lys
      Delay the loitering boat.
Derived terms
  • sweet flag
Translations

Etymology 4

Probably of Scandinavian/North Germanic origin; compare Icelandic flag.

Noun

flag (plural flags)

  1. (obsolete except in dialects) A slice of turf; a sod.
  2. A slab of stone; a flagstone, a flat piece of stone used for paving.
  3. (geology) Any hard, evenly stratified sandstone, which splits into layers suitable for flagstones.
Translations

Verb

flag (third-person singular simple present flags, present participle flagging, simple past and past participle flagged)

  1. (transitive) To pave with flagstones.
    Fred is planning to flag his patio this weekend.
Translations

Etymology 5

Noun

flag (plural flags)

  1. A group of feathers on the lower part of the legs of certain hawks, owls, etc.
  2. A group of elongated wing feathers in certain hawks.
  3. The bushy tail of a dog such as a setter.
  4. (music) A hook attached to the stem of a written note that assigns its rhythmic value

References


Chinese

Etymology

Borrowed from Japanese フラグ, from English flag.

Definitions

flag

  1. (Internet slang, ACG) A plot or words of a character in an animation, etc., that would usually lead to a specific outcome or event, not logically or causally, but as a pattern of the animation, etc., for example the words like “I will stop doing evil after this one last job” from a character, who usually would not survive the “job”. Also figurative.
    死亡flag  ―  sǐwáng flag  ―  the words of a character which, as a pattern, usually follows the character’s death
  2. goal; resolution; statement of intent
    新年flag  ―  xīnnián flag  ―  New Year resolutions
    flag  ―  flag  ―  to set up a goal
    他的flag倒了。  ―  Tāde flag dǎole.  ―  He didn’t achieve the goal.
    • 很多同學立了flag要好好備考,然而好的學習方法能起到事半功倍的效果。 [MSC, trad.]
      很多同学立了flag要好好备考,然而好的学习方法能起到事半功倍的效果。 [MSC, simp.]

      From: 2020 April 11, “雅思中国网” (username), Weibo post
      Hěnduō tóngxué lìle flag yào hǎohǎo bèikǎo, rán’ér hǎode xuéxí fāngfǎ néng qǐdào shìbàngōngbèi de xiàoguǒ. [Pinyin]
      Many students stated there resolution to study hard for the test, and a good way to study can yield twice the result with half the effort.
    • “這輩子不打工”的flag就先擱置吧。 [MSC, trad.]
      “这辈子不打工”的flag就先搁置吧。 [MSC, simp.]

      From: 2020 April 11, The Beijing News, “Internet Celebrity Theif to be Released: Put Aside For Now the Resolution to “Not Get Employed Forever””
      “zhè bèizǐ bù dǎgōng” de flag jiù xiān gēzhì ba. [Pinyin]
      Put aside for now the resolution to “not get employed forever”.

Danish

Etymology

From Dutch or English flag

Noun

flag n (singular definite flaget, plural indefinite flag)

  1. flag (cloth)
  2. flag (true-false variable)

Inflection

Verb

flag

  1. imperative of flage

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English flag.

Pronunciation

  • (Netherlands) IPA(key): /flɛɡ/
  • Hyphenation: flag

Noun

flag m (plural flags, diminutive flagje n)

  1. (computing) flag

Icelandic

Etymology

From Old Norse flag, flaga, probably from Proto-Germanic *flaką (something flat), from Proto-Indo-European *pleh₂- (flat, broad, plain). However, compare Proto-Germanic *plaggą.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /flaːɣ/
  • Rhymes: -aːɣ

Noun

flag n (genitive singular flags, nominative plural flög)

  1. area of ground stripped of turf

Declension

Related terms

  • flaga

References


Portuguese

Etymology

From English flag.

Noun

flag m or f (in variation) (plural flags)

  1. (programming) flag (true-or-false variable)
    Synonym: booleano


English

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): /swæɡ/
  • Rhymes: -æɡ

Etymology 1

From Middle English *swaggen, swagen, swoggen, probably from Old Norse sveggja (to swing, sway). Compare dialectal Norwegian svaga (to sway, swing, stagger).

Verb

swag (third-person singular simple present swags, present participle swagging, simple past and past participle swagged)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To (cause to) sway.
    Synonyms: sway, lurch
    • 1790, William Blake, The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, The Argument, p. 1,[2]
      Hungry clouds swag on the deep
  2. (intransitive) To droop; to sag.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir H. Wotton to this entry?)
    • 1530, John Palsgrave, L’esclarcissement de la langue francoyse
      I swagge as a fatte persos belly swaggeth as he goth.
  3. (transitive) To decorate (something) with loops of draped fabric.
  4. (transitive) To install (a ceiling fan or light fixture) by means of a long cord running from the ceiling to an outlet, and suspended by hooks or similar.
    • 1991, Kalton C. Lahue, Cheryl Smith, Interior Lighting (page 19)
      Hooks come with screws for use in plaster or wood and toggles for use in wallboard. One hook should be sufficient to swag a lamp from a ceiling outlet.

Noun

swag (plural swags)

  1. (window coverings) A loop of draped fabric.
    • 2005, Alan Hollinghurst, The Line of Beauty, Bloomsbury Publishing, page 438:
      He looked in bewilderment at number 24, the final house with its regalia of stucco swags and bows.
  2. A low point or depression in land; especially, a place where water collects.
    • 1902, D. G. Simmons, “The Influence of Contaminated Water in the Development of Diseases”, The American Practitioner and News, 34: 182.
      Whenever the muddy water would accumulate in the swag the water from the well in question would become muddy [] After the water in the swag had all disappeared through the sink-hole the well water would again become clear.

Derived terms

  • swagger

Etymology 2

Clipping of swagger. A common pseudo-etymology is the derivation as acronym for “secretly we are gay”, or other unlikely phrases.

Noun

swag (uncountable)

  1. (slang) Style; fashionable appearance or manner.
    • 2009, Mark Anthony Archer, Exile, page 119
      Now this dude got swag, and he was pushing up on me but, it wasn’t like we was kicking it or anything!

Derived terms

  • swag it out

Etymology 3

From 18th c. British thieves’ slang.

Noun

swag (plural swags)

  1. (obsolete, thieves’ cant) A shop and its goods; any quantity of goods. [18th c.]
    Synonym: stock
  2. (thieves’ cant, uncountable) Stolen goods; the booty of a burglar or thief; boodle. [18th c.]
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:booty
    • 1838, Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist, Chapter 19:
      “It′s all arranged about bringing off the swag, is it?” asked the Jew. Sikes nodded.
    • 1971 November 22, Frank E. Emerson, “They Can Get It For You BETTER Than Wholesale”, New York Magazine, page 38
      He was on his way to call on other dealers to check out their swag and to see if he could trade away some of his leftover odds and ends.
  3. (uncountable) Handouts, freebies, or giveaways, such as those handed out at conventions. [late 20th c.]
  4. (countable, Australia, dated) The possessions of a bushman or itinerant worker, tied up in a blanket and carried over the shoulder, sometimes attached to a stick.
  5. (countable, Australia, by extension) A small single-person tent, usually foldable into an integral backpack.
  6. (countable, Australia, New Zealand) A large quantity (of something).
    • 2010 August 31, “Hockey: Black Sticks lose World Cup opener”, The New Zealand Herald:
      New Zealand wasted a swag of chances to lose their opening women′s hockey World Cup match.
Derived terms
  • swagful, swagless
  • (shop): rum swag, swag barrow
  • (stolen goods): swag bag, swag chovey bloke, swagsman (fence)
  • (itinerant’s belongings): swagman

Verb

swag (third-person singular simple present swags, present participle swagging, simple past and past participle swagged)

  1. (Australia, transitive, intransitive) To travel on foot carrying a swag (possessions tied in a blanket). [From 1850s.]
    • 1880, James Coutts Crawford, Recollections of Travel in New Zealand and Australia, page 259,
      He told me that times had been bad at Invercargill, and that he had started for fresh pastures, had worked his passage up as mate in a small craft from the south, and, arriving in Port Underwood, had swagged his calico tent over the hill, and was now living in it, pitched in the manuka scrub.
    • 1976, Pembroke Arts Club, The Anglo-Welsh Review, page 158,
      That such a man was swagging in the Victoria Bush at the age of fifty-one requires explanation.
    • 2006, Inga Clendinnen, The History Question: Who Owns the Past?, Quarterly Essay, Issue 23, page 3,
      The plot is straightforward. A swagman is settling down by a billabong after a hard day′s swagging.
    • 2011, Penelope Debelle, Red Silk: The Life of Elliott Johnston QC, page 21,
      Over the Christmas of 1939, just three months after Britain and Australia had declared war on Germany, they went swagging together for a week and slept out under the stars in the Adelaide Hills, talking, walking and reading.
  2. To transport stolen goods.
Derived terms
  • swaggie
  • swagman
  • swag it
Translations

Etymology 4

Noun

swag (plural swags)

  1. Alternative letter-case form of SWAG; a wild guess or ballpark estimate.
    I can take a swag at the answer, but it may not be right.
Translations

References

Anagrams

  • AWGs, GWAS, WAGs, wags

Old Frisian

Etymology

From a word referring to the fence around a pasture; cf. Old Norse sveigr (supple branch, headkerchief), ultimately from a root meaning to bend or twist.

Noun

swāg f

  1. pasture

Descendants

  • Dutch: Zwaag
  • Frisian: sweach, swaech

Further reading

  • van der Sijs, Nicoline, editor (2010), “zwaag”, in Etymologiebank, Meertens Institute

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