flagitious vs heinous what difference

what is difference between flagitious and heinous

English

Etymology

Old French flagitieux or Latin flāgitiōsus, both ultimately from flāgitium (shameful crime), related to flagrum (whip).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /fləˈdʒɪʃəs/

Adjective

flagitious (comparative more flagitious, superlative most flagitious)

  1. (literary) Guilty of terrible crimes; wicked, criminal.
    • 1716 Nov 7th, quoted from 1742, probably Alexander Pope, God’s Revenge Against Punning, from Miscellanies, 3rd volume, page 227:
      This young Nobleman was not only a flagitious Punster himself, but was accessary to the Punning of others, by Consent, by Provocation, by Connivance, and by Defence of the Evil committed [] .
  2. (literary) Extremely brutal or wicked; heinous, monstrous.
    Synonyms: infamous, scandalous, nefarious, iniquitous
    • 1959 (1985), Rex Stout, “Assault on a Brownstone”, Death Times Three, page 186:
      As he entered he boomed: “Monstrous! Flagitious!”

References



English

Alternative forms

  • hainous (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English hainous, from Old French haïneus (compare French haineux) from haïr (to hate), hadir (to hate) (compare Old French enhadir (to become filled with hate)), from Frankish *hattjan (to hate)

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ˈheɪnəs/
  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈhiːnəs/
  • Rhymes: -eɪnəs

Adjective

heinous (comparative more heinous, superlative most heinous)

  1. Totally reprehensible.

Usage notes

  • Nouns to which “heinous” is often applied: crime, act, sin, murder, offence.

Synonyms

  • (totally reprehensible): abominable, horrible, odious

Antonyms

  • unheinous (rare)

Derived terms

  • unheinous
  • heinous crime

Translations

Anagrams

  • in house, in-house, inhouse

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