flail vs thresh what difference

what is difference between flail and thresh

English

Etymology

From Middle English flaile, flayle, from earlier fleil, fleyl, fleȝȝl, from Old English fligel, *flegel (flail), from Proto-Germanic *flagilaz (flail, whip), of uncertain origin. Perhaps related to Old French fil and Latin fīlum (“a fine thread or wire, a filament”, i.e. a defiling instrument for the thrashing of a wire). Cognate with Scots flail (a thresher’s flail), West Frisian fleil, flaaiel (flail), Dutch vlegel (flail), Low German vlegel (flail), German Flegel (flail). Possibly a native Germanic word from Proto-Germanic *flag-, *flah- (to whip, beat), from Proto-Indo-European *pleh₂k- (to beat, hit, strike; weep); compare Lithuanian plàkti (to whip, lash, flog), Ancient Greek πληγνύναι (plēgnúnai, strike, hit, encounter), Latin plangō (lament”, i.e. “beat one’s breast) + Proto-Germanic *-ilaz (instrumental suffix); or a borrowing of Latin flagellum, diminutive of flagrum (scourge, whip), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰlag-, *bʰlaǵ- (to beat); compare Old Norse blekkja (to beat, mistreat). Compare also Old French flael (flail), Walloon flayea (flail) (locally pronounced “flai”), Italian flagello (scourge, whip, plague).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fleɪl/
  • Rhymes: -eɪl

Noun

flail (plural flails)

  1. A tool used for threshing, consisting of a long handle with a shorter stick attached with a short piece of chain, thong or similar material.
  2. A weapon which has the (usually spherical) striking part attached to the handle with a flexible joint such as a chain.

Synonyms

  • threshel, thrashel

Quotations

  • 1631, John Milton, L’Allegro
    When in one night, ere glimpse of morn,
    His shadowy flail hath threshed the corn
    That ten day-labourers could not end;
  • 1816, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Kubla Khan
    Huge fragments vaulted like rebounding hail,
    Or chaffy grain beneath the thresher’s flail
  • 1842, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, The Slave in the Dismal Swamp
    On him alone the curse of Cain
    Fell, like a flail on the garnered grain,
    And struck him to the earth!
  • 1879, Henry George, Progress and Poverty, ch V
    If the farmer must use the spade because he has not capital enough for a plough, the sickle instead of the reaping machine, the flail instead of the thresher…

Translations

Coordinate terms

  • (weapon): nunchaku

Verb

flail (third-person singular simple present flails, present participle flailing, simple past and past participle flailed)

  1. (transitive) To beat using a flail or similar implement.
  2. (transitive) To wave or swing vigorously
    Synonym: thrash
    • 1937, H. P. Lovecraft, The Evil Clergyman
      He stopped in his tracks – then, flailing his arms wildly in the air, began to stagger backwards.
  3. (transitive) To thresh.
  4. (intransitive) To move like a flail.

Translations

See also

  • flail on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Flail in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Anagrams

  • Filla, alfil


English

Etymology

From Middle English thresshen, threshen, threschen, from Old English þrescan, from Proto-Germanic *þreskaną. Compare West Frisian terskje, Dutch dorsen, Low German dörschen, German dreschen, Danish tærske, Swedish tröska, Yiddish דרעשן(dreshn). Doublet of thrash.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: thrĕsh, IPA(key): /θɹɛʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ɛʃ

Verb

thresh (third-person singular simple present threshes, present participle threshing, simple past and past participle threshed)

  1. (transitive, agriculture) To separate the grain from the straw or husks (chaff) by mechanical beating, with a flail or machinery.
  2. (transitive, literary) To beat soundly, usually with some tool such as a stick or whip; to drub.

Synonyms

  • thrash

Derived terms

  • threshel
  • thresher
  • thresherman
  • threshing
  • threshold

Translations


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