flame vs flare what difference

what is difference between flame and flare

English

Etymology

From Middle English flawme, flaume, flaumbe, blend of Old French flame and flambe, flamble, the first from Latin flamma, the second from Latin flammula, diminutive of flamma, both from pre-Latin *fladma; ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *bʰlē- (to shimmer, gleam, shine).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: flām, IPA(key): /fleɪm/
  • Rhymes: -eɪm

Noun

flame (countable and uncountable, plural flames)

  1. The visible part of fire; a stream of burning vapour or gas, emitting light and heat.
    • Long after his cigar burnt bitter, he sat with eyes fixed on the blaze. When the flames at last began to flicker and subside, his lids fluttered, then drooped; but he had lost all reckoning of time when he opened them again to find Miss Erroll in furs and ball-gown kneeling on the hearth [].
  2. A romantic partner or lover in a usually short-lived but passionate affair.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:lover
  3. (Internet, somewhat dated) Intentionally insulting criticism or remark meant to incite anger.
  4. (color) A brilliant reddish orange-gold fiery colour.
  5. (music, chiefly lutherie) The contrasting light and dark figure seen in wood used for stringed instrument making; the curl.
  6. Burning zeal, passion, imagination, excitement, or anger.
    • 1834, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, “Julia”
      Till charming Florio, born to conquer, came
      And touch’d the fair one with an equal flame

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Verb

flame (third-person singular simple present flames, present participle flaming, simple past and past participle flamed)

  1. To produce flames; to burn with a flame or blaze.
  2. To burst forth like flame; to break out in violence of passion; to be kindled with zeal or ardour.
  3. (Internet, transitive, intransitive) To post a destructively critical or abusive message (to somebody).
    I flamed him for spamming in my favourite newsgroup.
    • 2019, Steven McCornack & Kelly Morrison, Reflect & Relate, 5th edition
      Because online communication makes it easy to flame, many of us impetuously fire off messages that we later regret.

Derived terms

  • flamer
  • flaming

Related terms

  • flambé

Translations

Adjective

flame (not comparable)

  1. Of a brilliant reddish orange-gold colour, like that of a flame.

Translations

See also

  • (reds) red; blood red, brick red, burgundy, cardinal, carmine, carnation, cerise, cherry, cherry red, Chinese red, cinnabar, claret, crimson, damask, fire brick, fire engine red, flame, flamingo, fuchsia, garnet, geranium, gules, hot pink, incarnadine, Indian red, magenta, maroon, misty rose, nacarat, oxblood, pillar-box red, pink, Pompeian red, poppy, raspberry, red violet, rose, rouge, ruby, ruddy, salmon, sanguine, scarlet, shocking pink, stammel, strawberry, Turkey red, Venetian red, vermillion, vinaceous, vinous, violet red, wine (Category: en:Reds)

Anagrams

  • femal, fleam

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /flam/
  • Homophones: flament, flames

Verb

flame

  1. first-person singular present indicative of flamer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of flamer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of flamer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of flamer
  5. second-person singular imperative of flamer

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old French flame.

Noun

flame

  1. Alternative form of flawme

Etymology 2

From Old French flamber.

Verb

flame

  1. Alternative form of flawmen

Old French

Etymology

From Latin flamma.

Noun

flame f (oblique plural flames, nominative singular flame, nominative plural flames)

  1. flame

Derived terms

  • enflamer

Descendants

  • English: flame
  • French: flamme

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈflame]

Noun

flame f

  1. indefinite plural of flamă
  2. indefinite genitive/dative singular of flamă

Walloon

Noun

flame f (plural flames)

  1. flame
    Synonym: blame


English

Etymology

Origin unknown, first recorded in the mid 16th century, probably related to Latin flagrō (I burn). Norwegian flara (to blaze; to flaunt in gaudy attire) has a similar meaning, but the English word predates it. Possibly related to Middle High German vlederen (to flutter), represented by modern German flattern.

The noun is derived from the verb.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /flɛə̯/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /flɛɚ̯/
  • Rhymes: -ɛə(ɹ)
  • Homophone: flair

Noun

flare (plural flares)

  1. A sudden bright light.
  2. A source of brightly burning light or intense heat.
    1. A type of pyrotechnic that produces a brilliant light without an explosion, used to attract attention in an emergency, to illuminate an area, or as a decoy.
    2. (oil industry) A flame produced by a burn-off of waste gas (flare gas) from a flare tower (or flare stack), typically at an oil refinery.
  3. (figuratively) A sudden eruption or outbreak; a flare-up.
  4. A widening of an object with an otherwise roughly constant width.
  5. (in the plural) Bell-bottom trousers.
  6. (aviation) The transition from downward flight to level flight just before landing.
  7. (baseball) A low fly ball that is hit in the region between the infielders and the outfielders.
    Synonyms: blooper, Texas leaguer
  8. (American football) A route run by the running back, releasing toward the sideline and then slightly arcing upfield looking for a short pass.
  9. (photography) Short for lens flare.
  10. An inflammation such as of tendons (tendonitis) or joints (osteoarthritis).
    Synonym: flare-up
  11. A breakdance move of someone helicoptering his torso on alternating arms.

Hyponyms

  • (pyrotechnic): Bengal light, fusee (colored flare used as a warning on a railroad) (US), parachute flare, Very light

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

flare (third-person singular simple present flares, present participle flaring, simple past and past participle flared)

  1. (transitive) To cause to burn.
  2. (transitive) To cause inflammation; to inflame.
  3. (transitive, intransitive) To open outward in shape.
  4. (transitive, intransitive, aviation) To (operate an aircraft to) transition from downward flight to level flight just before landing.
  5. (intransitive) To blaze brightly.
  6. (intransitive) To shine out with a sudden and unsteady light; to emit a dazzling or painfully bright light.
  7. (intransitive, figuratively) To shine out with gaudy colours; to be offensively bright or showy.
  8. (intransitive, figuratively) To suddenly happen or intensify.
    Synonym: flare up
  9. (intransitive, figuratively) To suddenly erupt in anger.
    Synonym: flare up
  10. (intransitive, obsolete) To be exposed to too much light.

Conjugation

Derived terms

Translations

References

  • flare in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • flare at OneLook Dictionary Search

Further reading

  • flare on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • gas flare on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • feral

Finnish

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: fla‧re

Noun

flare

  1. (astronomy) solar flare

Declension

Synonyms

  • auringonpurkaus
  • soihtupurkaus

Latin

Verb

flāre

  1. present active infinitive of flō
  2. second-person singular present passive imperative of flō
  3. second-person singular present passive indicative of flō

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial