flange vs rim what difference

what is difference between flange and rim

English

Etymology

From dialectal English flange (to project), flanch (a projection), from Old French flanche (flank, side). See flank. As a term for a group of baboons, it was popularized in the comedy TV series Not the Nine O’Clock News.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /flændʒ/

Noun

flange (plural flanges)

  1. An external or internal rib or rim, used either to add strength or to hold something in place.
  2. The projecting edge of a rigid or semi-rigid component.
  3. (role-playing games) An ability in a role-playing game which is not commonly available, overpowered or arbitrarily imposed by the referees.
    • 1998: Mr MI Pennington, Can the Players be Trusted? on rec.games.frp.live-action [1] [The] enduring problem with the Gathering is that [players] can’t affect anything that happens … whatever they do, the LT just flange it back to the original plot line.
    • 2007: balor, Changing the metaphysics on Rule 7 [2] ‘Oh look, the amulet of flange has been activated, this means all Paladins now only have one heal per day instead of two.’
  4. (vulgar slang) A vulva.
    • 2001: tedfat, Flange!!!! in alt.society.nottingham [3]
      I was in bed the other day with the missus and I asked to see her flange. Imagine my surprise when she got up went downstairs to my toolbox and brought me up a metal looking object called a flange!!!!! Needless to say when she asked to see my nuts the next time I obliged by doing exactly the same as her.
    • 2003: Ray Gordon, Hot Sheets [4]
      ‘God, she’s got a tight flange!’ the plumber gasped, splaying the girl’s buttocks and focusing on her O-ring.
  5. (rare, humorous) The collective noun for a group of baboons.
    • 1980s (first use), Rowan Atkinson – Not the Nine O’clock News
    • 2006, Rick Crosier – Getting Away with Murder
      (I suspect they hired a flange of baboons to mind the house.)
  6. The electronic sound distortion produced by a flanger.

Synonyms

  • (collective noun for a group of baboons) troop, congress

Derived terms

  • flange greaser
  • flange lubricator
  • flange oiler

Translations

Verb

flange (third-person singular simple present flanges, present participle flanging, simple past and past participle flanged)

  1. (intransitive) To be bent into a flange.
  2. (transitive) To make a flange on; to furnish with a flange.
  3. (transitive, sound engineering) To mix two copies of together, one delayed by a very short, slowly varying time.

Anagrams

  • fangle

Danish

Etymology

From English flange.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /flanɡsjɘ/, [ˈflɑŋɕɘ]

Noun

flange c (singular definite flangen, plural indefinite flanger)

  1. flange (external or internal rib or rim)

Inflection


Italian

Alternative forms

  • flangie (misspelling)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈflan.d͡ʒe/
  • Rhymes: -andʒe

Noun

flange f pl

  1. plural of flangia


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɹɪm/
  • Rhymes: -ɪm

Etymology 1

From Middle English rim, rym, rime, from Old English rima (rim, edge, border, bank, coast), from Proto-Germanic *rimô, *rembô (edge, border), from Proto-Indo-European *rem-, *remə- (to rest, support, be based). Cognate with Saterland Frisian Rim (plank, wooden cross, trellis), Old Saxon rimi (edge; border; trim), Icelandic rimi (a strip of land).

Noun

rim (plural rims)

  1. An edge around something, especially when circular.
  2. (automotive, cycling) A wheelrim.
    • 2010, Rochelle Magee, No Witnesses: A Perilous Journey (page 36)
      About an hour later, she noticed an all black Phantom with tints and chrome rims riding slowly through the car lot.
  3. (journalism) A semicircular copydesk.
    • 2004, John Russial, Strategic Copy Editing (page 130)
      A copy chief with poor people skills makes life miserable for copy editors on the rim; []
    • 2009, Gaylon Eugene Murray, Effective Editing (page 7)
      On the rim are copy editors who edit stories for accuracy, brevity and clarity.

Derived terms

  • Pacific Rim

Translations

See also

  • (wheel rim): mag wheel, alloy wheel

Verb

rim (third-person singular simple present rims, present participle rimming, simple past and past participle rimmed) (transitive)

  1. To form a rim on.
  2. (transitive) To follow the contours, possibly creating a circuit.
  3. (transitive or intransitive, of a ball) To roll around a rim.

Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English rim, rym, ryme, reme, from Old English rēoma (membrane, ligament), from Proto-West Germanic *reumō.

Noun

rim (plural rims)

  1. (Britain dialectal) A membrane.
  2. (Britain dialectal or obsolete) The membrane enclosing the intestines; the peritoneum, hence loosely, the intestines; the lower part of the abdomen; belly.

Etymology 3

From a variation of ream.

Verb

rim (third-person singular simple present rims, present participle rimming, simple past and past participle rimmed)

  1. (slang) To lick the anus of a partner as a sexual act.
    • 2008, Lexy Harper, Bedtime Erotica for Freaks (Like Me), page 216
      When she started thrusting her hips back against his finger, he turned her over and rimmed her asshole as he fingered her clit.

Derived terms

  • rim job

Related terms

  • ream job

Translations

Anagrams

  • IRM, MIR, MRI, Mir, RMI, miR, mir

Danish

Etymology 1

From Old Norse hrím, from Proto-Germanic *hrīmą.

Noun

rim c (singular definite rimen, not used in plural form)

  1. hoarfrost, rime

Etymology 2

From late Old Norse rím, from Middle Low German rim, from French rime (rhyme).

Noun

rim n (singular definite rimet, plural indefinite rim)

  1. rhyme
Inflection
Further reading
  • rim on the Danish Wikipedia.Wikipedia da

Etymology 3

See rime.

Verb

rim

  1. imperative of rime

Indonesian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈrɪm]
  • Hyphenation: rim

Etymology 1

From Dutch riem, from Middle Dutch rieme, from Old French raime, rayme (ream), from Arabic رِزْمَة(rizma, bundle).

Noun

rim (first-person possessive rimku, second-person possessive rimmu, third-person possessive rimnya)

  1. ream, a bundle, package, or quantity of paper, nowadays usually containing 500 sheets.

Etymology 2

From Dutch riem, from Middle Dutch rieme, from Old Dutch *riomo, from Proto-West Germanic *reumō.

Noun

rim (first-person possessive rimku, second-person possessive rimmu, third-person possessive rimnya)

  1. (colloquial) leather belt.

Further reading

  • “rim” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Mizo

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /rim/

Noun

rim

  1. smell
  2. odour

Adverb

rim

  1. hard

Northern Kurdish

Alternative forms

  • rimb

Etymology

From Arabic رُمْح(rumḥ). For rimb, compare the probably related Old Armenian ռումբ (ṙumb).

Noun

r̄im ?

  1. spear, lance, javelin
  2. unit of measure the length of a spear

Descendants

  • Armenian: ռըմ (ṙəm) (Van, Moks, Shatakh)

References


Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From Old Norse rím and (Old?) French rime

Noun

rim n (definite singular rimet, indefinite plural rim, definite plural rima or rimene)

  1. a rhyme
Derived terms
  • barnerim

Etymology 2

From Old Norse hrím

Noun

rim m (definite singular rimen, uncountable)
rim n (definite singular rimet, uncountable)

  1. rime (frost)
Derived terms
  • rimfrost

References

  • “rim” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /riːm/

Etymology 1

From Old Norse rím, from Old French rime.

Noun

rim n (definite singular rimet, indefinite plural rim, definite plural rima)

  1. a rhyme
Derived terms
  • barnerim

Etymology 2

From Old Norse hrím. Akin to English rime.

Noun

rim n (definite singular rimet, uncountable)

  1. rime (frost)
Derived terms
  • rimfrost

References

  • “rim” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *rīmą (number, count, series), from Proto-Indo-European *re(i)- (to reason, count). Akin to Old Frisian rīm, Old Saxon -rīm, Old High German rīm, Icelandic rím.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /riːm/

Noun

rīm n

  1. number

Declension

Derived terms

Descendants

  • English: rime, rhyme

Portuguese

Etymology

Via Old Portuguese rin, from Latin rēn, from Proto-Italic *hrēn, possibly from Proto-Indo-European *gʷʰren- (an internal part of the body).

Pronunciation

  • (Portugal, Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈʁĩ/
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): [ˈʁĩ]
  • Hyphenation: rim

Noun

rim m (plural rins)

  1. kidney
  2. (in the plural) small of the back

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse rím, from Proto-Germanic *rīmą.

Noun

rim n

  1. rhyme

Declension

See also

  • rimma

Volapük

Noun

rim (nominative plural rims)

  1. rhyme

Declension

See also

  • rimod

Westrobothnian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ríːm] (example of pronunciation)
    Rhymes: -íːm

Etymology 1

From Old Norse hrím, from Proto-Germanic *hrīmą.

Noun

rim n

  1. frost, hoarfrost

Etymology 2

From Old Norse rím, from Proto-Germanic *rīmą.

Noun

rim n

  1. story, poem, saga
  2. rumour

Related terms

  • riim

Synonyms

  • (story, saga) sögu

Zhuang

Etymology

From Proto-Tai *k.temᴬ (full). Cognate with Thai เต็ม (dtem), Lao ເຕັມ (tem), Northern Thai ᨲᩮ᩠ᨾ, ᦎᦲᧄ (ṫiim), Shan တဵမ် (těm), Nong Zhuang daem.

Pronunciation

  • (Standard Zhuang) IPA(key): /ɣim˨˦/
  • Tone numbers: rim1
  • Hyphenation: rim

Adjective

rim (old orthography rim)

  1. full

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