flannel vs gabardine what difference

what is difference between flannel and gabardine

English

Alternative forms

  • flannen (dialectal)
  • flanan, flanning, flanen (Scotland)

Etymology

From Middle English flaunneol, from Anglo-Norman flanelle (compare Norman flianné), diminutive of Old French flaine, floene (coarse wool), from Gaulish, from Proto-Celtic *wlānos, *wlanā (wool) (compare Welsh gwlân, Breton gloan), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂wĺ̥h₁neh₂. More at wool.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈflænəl/
  • Rhymes: -ænəl
  • Hyphenation: flan‧nel

Noun

flannel (countable and uncountable, plural flannels)

  1. (uncountable) A soft cloth material originally woven from wool, today often combined with cotton or synthetic fibers.
    With the weather turning colder, it was time to dig out our flannel sheets and nightclothes.
    • 2012, Tom Lamont, How Mumford & Sons became the biggest band in the world (in The Daily Telegraph, 15 November 2012)[1]
      First singer and guitarist Marcus Mumford, wearing a black suit, then bassist Ted Dwane, in leather bomber and T-shirt. Next bearded banjo player Winston Marshall, his blue flannel shirt hanging loose, and pianist Ben Lovett, wrapped in a woollen coat.
  2. (New Zealand, Australia, Britain, countable) A washcloth.
  3. (US, countable) A flannel shirt.
  4. (slang, uncountable) Soothing, plausible untruth or half-truth; claptrap.
    Don’t talk flannel!

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Chinese:
    • Mandarin: 法蘭絨 (fǎlánróng)
  • Danish: flannel
  • French: flanelle (see there for further descendants)
  • Japanese: フランネル (furaneru)

Translations

Adjective

flannel (not comparable)

  1. Made of flannel.

Translations

Verb

flannel (third-person singular simple present flannels, present participle flanneling or flannelling, simple past and past participle flanneled or flannelled)

  1. (transitive) To rub with a flannel.
  2. (transitive) To wrap in flannel.
  3. (transitive) To flatter; to suck up to.

Anagrams

  • fannell

Danish

Etymology

From English flannel. Cognate to flonel and to Welsh gwlân (wool).

Noun

flannel

  1. soft, slightly scratched woven fabric made of wool

References

  • “flannel” in Den Danske Ordbog


English

Alternative forms

  • gaberdine
  • garbardine

Etymology

Recorded since 1904, altering the earlier gaberdine (long, coarse outer garment) (since 1520), from Spanish gabardina (perhaps influenced by gabán (overcoat) and tabardina (coarse coat)), from Middle French galverdine, itself probably from (Old or Middle) High German wallevart (pilgrimage), in the sense of “pilgrim’s cloak” (from wallen (to ambulate) + vart (journey)).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɡæbəˌdiːn/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɡæbɚˌdin/

Noun

gabardine (usually uncountable, plural gabardines)

  1. (uncountable, countable) A type of woolen cloth with a diagonal ribbed texture on one side.
  2. (uncountable, countable) A similar fabric, made from cotton.
  3. (countable) A gaberdine (garment).
  4. (countable, historical) A yellow robe that Jews in England were compelled to wear in the year 1189 as a mark of distinction.

    You call me misbeliever, cut-throat dog,
    And spet upon my Jewish gabardine,

    And all for use of that which is mine own.

Translations

Further reading

  • gabardine on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • bargained

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English gabardine.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɣɑ.bɑrˈdi.nə/

Adjective

gabardine (not comparable)

  1. made from gabardine

Inflection

Noun

gabardine f (plural gabardines, diminutive gabardinetje n)

  1. The woolen (cloth) Gabardine
  2. An overcoat or raincoat (of this material)

References

  • “gabardine” in Woordenlijst Nederlandse Taal – Officiële Spelling, Nederlandse Taalunie. [the official spelling word list for the Dutch language]

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Spanish gabardina (perhaps influenced by gabán (overcoat) and tabardina (coarse coat)), from Middle French galverdine, itself probably from (Old or Middle) High German wallevart (pilgrimage), in the sense of “pilgrim’s cloak”

Pronunciation

Noun

gabardine f (plural gabardines)

  1. The woolen cloth gaberdine
  2. A long coat with sleeves, notably a raincoat

Further reading

  • “gabardine” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from French, from Spanish gabardina (perhaps influenced by gabán (overcoat) and tabardina (coarse coat)), from Middle French galverdine, itself probably from (Old or Middle) High German wallevart (pilgrimage) in the sense of “pilgrim’s cloak”.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡa.barˈdi.ne/

Noun

gabardine m (invariable)

  1. the woolen cloth gabardine
  2. an overcoat or raincoat, (originally) of this material

Portuguese

Noun

gabardine f (plural gabardines)

  1. Alternative form of gabardina

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