flap vs pother what difference

what is difference between flap and pother

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /flæp/
  • Rhymes: -æp

Etymology 1

From Middle English flap, flappe (a slap; blow; buffet; fly-flap; something flexible or loose; flap), related to Middle Dutch flabbe (a blow; slap on the face; fly-flap; flap) (modern Dutch flap (flap)), Middle Low German flabbe, vlabbe, flebbe, from the verb (see below). Related also to English flab and flabby.

Noun

flap (plural flaps)

  1. Anything broad and flexible that hangs loose, or that is attached by one side or end and is easily moved.
  2. A hinged leaf.
  3. (aviation) A hinged surface on the trailing edge of the wings of an aeroplane.
  4. A side fin of a ray.
    Synonym: wing
  5. The motion of anything broad and loose, or a sound or stroke made with it.
  6. A controversy, scandal, stir, or upset.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:commotion
  7. (phonetics) A consonant sound made by a single muscle contraction, such as the sound [[ɾ]] in the standard American English pronunciation of body.
    Synonym: tap
  8. (surgery) A piece of tissue incompletely detached from the body, as an intermediate stage of plastic surgery.
  9. (veterinary medicine) A disease in the lips of horses.
  10. (slang, vulgar, chiefly in the plural) The labia, the vulva.
  11. (obsolete) A blow or slap (especially to the face).
    • 1450, Palladius on Husbondrieː
      Ware the horn and heels lest they fling a flap to thee.
    • a1500 The Prose Merlinː
      The squire lift up his hand and gave him such a flap that all they in the chapel might it hear.
  12. (obsolete) A young prostitute.
    • 1631, James Mabbe, Celestina IX. 110
      Fall to your flap, my Masters, kisse and clip. [] Come hither, you foule flappes.
Derived terms
  • cat flap
  • (aeroplane): flaperon
  • flap seat
Translations
See also
  • flap on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • fold
  • lappet

Etymology 2

From Middle English flappen (to flap, clap, slap, strike), related to Dutch flappen (to flap), German Low German flappen (to flap), German flappen (to flap), Dutch flabberen (to flit, flap). Probably ultimately imitative.

Verb

flap (third-person singular simple present flaps, present participle flapping, simple past and past participle flapped)

  1. (transitive) To move (something broad and loose) up and down.
    The crow slowly flapped its wings.
  2. (intransitive) To move loosely back and forth.
    The flag flapped in the breeze.
  3. (computing, telecommunications, intransitive) Of a resource or network destination: to be advertised as being available and then unavailable (or available by different routes) in rapid succession.
Translations

Derived terms

  • aflap
  • flapper
  • flappingly
  • unflappable

Anagrams

  • PLAF

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch flabbe, probably ultimately imitative.

Pronunciation

Noun

flap m (plural flappen, diminutive flapje n)

  1. flap (something flexible that is loose)
  2. (colloquial) banknote

Derived terms

  • appelflap
  • flappentap
  • flappen tappen

Volapük

Noun

flap (nominative plural flaps)

  1. blow, hit

Declension

Derived terms

  • flapan
  • flapön


English

Etymology

Origin uncertain. Compare Dutch peuteren (to rummage, poke), and English potter, pudder.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpʌðə/, /ˈpɒðə/
  • Rhymes: -ʌðə(ɹ)
  • Rhymes: -ɒðə(ɹ)

Noun

pother (countable and uncountable, plural pothers)

  1. A commotion, a tempest.
    • 1605, William Shakespeare, King Lear III.ii:
      Let the great gods, / That keep this dreadful pother o’er our heads, / Find out their enemies now.
    • 1941, Lewiston Morning Tribune, 14th of May:
      (name of the article) Flight Of Hess Causes Pother Among Germans
    • 1951, C. S. Lewis, Prince Caspian, Collins, 1998, Chapter 5,
      After some years there came a time when the Queen seemed to be ill and there was a great deal of bustle and pother about her in the castle and doctors came and the courtiers whispered.

Translations

Verb

pother (third-person singular simple present pothers, present participle pothering, simple past and past participle pothered)

  1. (intransitive) To make a bustle or stir; to be fussy.
  2. (transitive) To puzzle or perplex.

Anagrams

  • Thorpe, Topher, tephro-, thorpe

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