flask vs flaskful what difference

what is difference between flask and flaskful

English

Etymology

From Middle English flask, flaske (case, cask, keg), from Old English flasce, flaxe (bottle, flask) and Medieval Latin flascō (bottle); from Frankish *flasko, *flaska; whence also Dutch fles; both from Proto-Germanic *flaskǭ (braid-covered bottle, wicker-enclosed jug) (whence also German Low German Flaske, Fless, German Flasche), from Proto-Indo-European *ploḱ-skō (flat) (whence also Lithuanian plókščias, Czech ploský, Albanian flashkët).

Sense 2 from Italian fiasco and sense 3 from Middle French flasque (powder flask), itself from Old Spanish flasco, frasco, both from Late Latin above.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: fläsk, IPA(key): /flɑːsk/
  • enPR: flăsk, IPA(key): /flæsk/
  • Rhymes: -æsk

Noun

flask (plural flasks)

  1. A narrow-necked vessel of metal or glass, used for various purposes; as of sheet metal, to carry gunpowder in; or of wrought iron, to contain quicksilver; or of glass, to heat water in, etc.
  2. A container used to discreetly carry a small amount of a hard alcoholic beverage; a pocket flask.
  3. (sciences) Laboratory glassware used to hold larger volumes than test tubes, normally having a narrow mouth of a standard size which widens to a flat or spherical base.
  4. (engineering) A container for holding a casting mold, especially for sand casting molds.
  5. A bed in a gun carriage.
    (The addition of quotations indicative of this usage is being sought:)

Translations

Verb

flask (third-person singular simple present flasks, present participle flasking, simple past and past participle flasked)

  1. (dentistry) To invest a denture in a flask so as to produce a sectional mold.

Anagrams

  • falks, flaks

Danish

Verb

flask

  1. imperative of flaske

Dutch

Etymology

From French flasque (flask). Doublette with (native) fles (bottle), (through French) flacon (flagon) and (through Italian) fiasco (fiasco).

Noun

flask f (plural flasken, diminutive flaskje n)

  1. flask

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • flaske

Etymology

From Anglo-Norman flascon, from Frankish *flaskā, from Proto-Germanic *flaskǭ. Reinforced by existing Old English flasce, from the same source.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈflask(ə)/

Noun

flask (plural flaskes) (rare)

  1. A small barrel for beer storage.
  2. A container for the storage of garments.

Related terms

  • flasket

Descendants

  • English: flask
  • Scots: flask, flas

References

  • “flask, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-05-04.

Old Frisian

Alternative forms

  • flēsk

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *flaiski. Cognates include Old English flǣsċ and Old Saxon flēsk.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈflaːsk/

Noun

flāsk n

  1. flesh

Descendants

  • North Frisian:
    Mooring: flååsch
  • Saterland Frisian: Flaask

References

  • Bremmer, Rolf H. (2009) An Introduction to Old Frisian: History, Grammar, Reader, Glossary, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, →ISBN, page 28


English

Etymology

flask +‎ -ful

Noun

flaskful (plural flaskfuls)

  1. As much as a flask will hold.

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