flatus vs wind what difference

what is difference between flatus and wind

English

Etymology

Borrowed into English around 1660–1670; from Latin flātus (blowing, wind, fart), from flō (blow).

Pronunciation

  • (General American, Received Pronunciation)1 IPA(key): /ˈfleɪtəs/
  • (Received Pronunciation, extremely rare)2 IPA(key): /ˈflætəs/
  • Rhymes: -eɪtəs, -ætəs
  • Hyphenation: fla‧tus

Noun

flatus (countable and uncountable, plural flatuses)

  1. (uncountable) Gas generated in the digestive tract.
  2. (countable) Expulsion of such gas through the anus.
    • 1940: Walter Robson Humphries, William Ogilvie and the Projected Union of the Colleges, 1786–1787, p70
      The point of quoque with illos is that those flatus, which have the right to be called winds, are also subject to laws like the winds themselves.
    • 2006: Steve Nichols, TARO of the FOUR WORLDS, p139 →ISBN
      And as they perceived in her sundry natures, and divers properties, so they ascribed unto her divers and several names, and erected Statues and Altars unto her, according to those names, under which they then so worshipped and adored her, who (as I have already written) was with many taken and understood for Juno: and those flatus and images which were dedicated unto her, were made also many times of many other goddesses: whose properties signified them to be in nature the same as the earth, as first Lagran Madre, la Madre de i dei, Ope (Ops), Phes, Cibelle, Vesta, Ceres, Proserpina, and many others which of their places and habitations where they then remained, had their names accordingly, all signifying one & the same thing, being as I have said, the Earth, for which indeed, & from whose fruits, all things here in the world seem to receive their life and being, and are nourished & conserved by these fertileness thereof, and in this respect she was called the mother of the gods, insomuch, as all those gods of the Ancients, which were so superstitiously adored and held in that respective regardance, lived here once on the earth, and were fed and maintained by the increases, fruits, & suppeditaments thereof.
    • 2007: Harold John Cook, Matters of Exchange: Commerce, Medicine, and Science in the Dutch Golden Age, p373 →ISBN
      A long summary of the work quickly appeared in the Royal Society’s Philosophical Transactions, which began with the theory Ten Rhijne’s had adapted from his Japanese colleagues: “This Author treating of the Gout, … asserts Flatus or Wind included between the Periosteum and the bone to be the genuine producer of those intolerable Pains … and that all the method of cure ought to tend toward the dispelling those Flatus”.156
  3. (obsolete) Morbid inflation or swelling.
    • 1730 April, Jonathan Swift, “A Vindication of the Lord Carteret”, in Thomas Sheridan and John Nichols (Eds.), The Works of the Rev. Jonathan Swift, D.D., Dean of St. Patrick’s, Dublin, Volume IX, J. Johnson &c. (1801), page 226,
      […] an incensed political surgeon, who is not in much renown for his mercy, upon great provocations: who, without waiting for his death, will flay and dissect him alive; and to the view of mankind lay open all the disordered cells of his brain, the venom of his tongue, the corruption of his heart, and spots and flatuses of his spleen: and all this for threepence.

Synonyms

  • (expulsion): fart (impolite), flatulence.
  • See also Thesaurus:flatus

Derived terms

  • flatuency

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • faults, futsal, ustalf

Esperanto

Verb

flatus

  1. conditional of flati

Latin

Etymology

From flō +‎ -tus.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈflaː.tus/, [ˈfɫ̪äːt̪ʊs̠]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈfla.tus/, [ˈflɑːt̪us]

Noun

flātus m (genitive flātūs); fourth declension

  1. blowing, breathing, snorting
  2. breath; breeze
  3. soul (breath of life)

Declension

Fourth-declension noun.

Related terms

  • flātō

Descendants

  • Italian: fiato
  • Piedmontese: fià
  • Rhaeto-Romance:
    • Friulian: flât
    • Romansch: flad, fled, flà, flo
  • English: flatus
  • Portuguese: flato
  • Spanish: flato

References

  • flatus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • flatus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • flatus in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.


English

Etymology 1

From Middle English wynd, wind, from Old English wind (wind), from Proto-Germanic *windaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂wéh₁n̥tos (wind), from earlier *h₂wéh₁n̥ts (wind), derived from the present participle of *h₂weh₁- (to blow). Cognate with Dutch wind, German Wind, West Frisian wyn, Norwegian and Swedish vind, Icelandic vindur, Latin ventus, Welsh gwynt, Sanskrit वात (vā́ta), Russian ве́тер (véter), perhaps Albanian bundë (strong damp wind). Cognate to vent.

Alternative forms

  • winde (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • enPR: wĭnd, IPA(key): /ˈwɪnd/
  • (archaic) enPR: wīnd, IPA(key): /ˈwaɪnd/
  • Rhymes: -ɪnd

Noun

wind (countable and uncountable, plural winds)

  1. (countable, uncountable) Real or perceived movement of atmospheric air usually caused by convection or differences in air pressure.
  2. Air artificially put in motion by any force or action.
  3. (countable, uncountable) The ability to breathe easily.
  4. News of an event, especially by hearsay or gossip. (Used with catch, often in the past tense.)
  5. One of the five basic elements in Indian and Japanese models of the Classical elements.
  6. (uncountable, colloquial) Flatus.
  7. Breath modulated by the respiratory and vocal organs, or by an instrument.
    • Their instruments were various in their kind, / Some for the bow, and some for breathing wind.
  8. (music) The woodwind section of an orchestra. Occasionally also used to include the brass section.
  9. A direction from which the wind may blow; a point of the compass; especially, one of the cardinal points, which are often called the “four winds”.
    • Come from the four winds, O breath, and breathe upon these slain.
  10. Types of playing-tile in the game of mah-jongg, named after the four winds.
  11. A disease of sheep, in which the intestines are distended with air, or rather affected with a violent inflammation. It occurs immediately after shearing.
  12. Mere breath or talk; empty effort; idle words.
  13. A bird, the dotterel.
  14. (boxing, slang) The region of the solar plexus, where a blow may paralyze the diaphragm and cause temporary loss of breath or other injury.
Synonyms
  • (movement of air): breeze, draft, gale; see also Thesaurus:wind
  • (flatus): gas (US); see also Thesaurus:flatus
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Tok Pisin: win
  • Torres Strait Creole: win
Translations

See wind/translations § Etymology 1.

See also

Verb

wind (third-person singular simple present winds, present participle winding, simple past and past participle winded or (proscribed) wound)

  1. (transitive) To blow air through a wind instrument or horn to make a sound.
  2. (transitive) To cause (someone) to become breathless, as by a blow to the abdomen, or by physical exertion, running, etc.
    The boxer was winded during round two.
  3. (transitive, Britain) To cause a baby to bring up wind by patting its back after being fed.
  4. (transitive, Britain) To turn a boat or ship around, so that the wind strikes it on the opposite side.
  5. (transitive) To expose to the wind; to winnow; to ventilate.
  6. (transitive) To perceive or follow by scent.
    The hounds winded the game.
  7. (transitive) To rest (a horse, etc.) in order to allow the breath to be recovered; to breathe.
  8. (transitive) To turn a windmill so that its sails face into the wind.
Usage notes
  • The form “wound” in the past is occasionally found in reference to blowing a horn, but is often considered to be erroneous. The October 1875 issue of The Galaxy disparaged this usage as a “very ridiculous mistake” arising from a misunderstanding of the word’s meaning.
  • A similar solecism occurs in the use (in this sense) of the pronunciation /waɪnd/, sometimes heard in singing and oral reading of verse, e.g., The huntsman /waɪndz/ his horn.
Descendants
  • Tok Pisin: winim
Translations

See wind/translations § Etymology 1.

Etymology 2

From Middle English wynden, from Old English windan, from Proto-Germanic *windaną. Compare West Frisian wine, Low German winden, Dutch winden, German winden, Danish vinde, Walloon windea. See also the related term wend.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: wīnd, IPA(key): /waɪnd/
  • Rhymes: -aɪnd
  • Homophones: wined, whined (in accents with the wine-whine merger)

Verb

wind (third-person singular simple present winds, present participle winding, simple past and past participle wound or winded)

  1. (transitive) To turn coils of (a cord or something similar) around something.
    • It was April 22, 1831, and a young man was walking down Whitehall in the direction of Parliament Street. He wore shepherd’s plaid trousers and the swallow-tail coat of the day, with a figured muslin cravat wound about his wide-spread collar.
  2. (transitive) To tighten the spring of a clockwork mechanism such as that of a clock.
  3. (transitive) To entwist; to enfold; to encircle.
  4. (intransitive) To travel in a way that is not straight.
    • 1751, Thomas Gray, Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard
      The lowing herd wind slowly o’er the lea.
    • 1969, Paul McCartney, The Long and Winding Road
      The long and winding road / That leads to your door / Will never disappear.
  5. (transitive) To have complete control over; to turn and bend at one’s pleasure; to vary or alter or will; to regulate; to govern.
    • Gifts blind the wise, and bribes do please / And wind all other witnesses.
    • 12 October 1710, Joseph Addison, The Examiner No. 5
      Were our legislature vested in the person of our prince, he might doubtless wind and turn our constitution at his pleasure.
  6. (transitive) To introduce by insinuation; to insinuate.
    • 1674, Richard Allestree, The Government of the Tongue
      ‘Tis pleasant to see what little arts and dexterities they have to wind in such things into discourse
  7. (transitive) To cover or surround with something coiled about.
  8. (transitive) To cause to move by exerting a winding force; to haul or hoist, as by a winch.
    • 2012, “Rural Affairs”, Anna Hutton-North, Lulu.com →ISBN [1]
  9. (transitive, nautical) To turn (a ship) around, end for end.
Derived terms
Related terms
Descendants
  • Esperanto: vindi
Translations

See wind/translations § Etymology 2.

Noun

wind (plural winds)

  1. The act of winding or turning; a turn; a bend; a twist.

References

  • wind at OneLook Dictionary Search

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch wind, from Middle Dutch wint, from Old Dutch wint, from Proto-Germanic *windaz, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₂wéh₁n̥ts (blowing), present participle of *h₂weh₁- (to blow).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /vənt/

Noun

wind (plural winde, diminutive windjie)

  1. wind (movement of air)

Alemannic German

Alternative forms

  • wénn, winn, wend

Etymology

From Old High German wint, from Proto-Germanic *windaz. Cognate with German Wind, Dutch wind, English wind, Icelandic vindur, Gothic ???????????????????? (winds).

Noun

wind m

  1. (Carcoforo) wind

References

  • “wind” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle isole linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʋɪnt/
  • Hyphenation: wind
  • Rhymes: -ɪnt
  • Homophone: wint

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch wint, from Old Dutch wint, from Proto-Germanic *windaz, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₂wéh₁n̥ts (blowing), present participle of *h₂weh₁- (to blow).

Noun

wind m (plural winden, diminutive windje n)

  1. wind (movement of air)
  2. flatulence, fart
    Synonyms: bout, buikwind, ruft, scheet
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: wind
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: wende
  • Negerhollands: wind, win, wen
  • Skepi Creole Dutch: went
  • Sranan Tongo: winti

Etymology 2

From Middle Dutch wint. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Noun

wind m (plural winden, diminutive windje n)

  1. (obsolete) greyhound
Derived terms
  • windhond
Related terms
  • hond

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

wind

  1. first-person singular present indicative of winden
  2. imperative of winden

Middle English

Etymology 1

Noun

wind

  1. Alternative form of wynd

Etymology 2

Verb

wind

  1. Alternative form of wynden (to wind)

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *wind.

Germanic cognates include Old Frisian wind, Old Saxon wind, Dutch wind, Old High German wint (German Wind), Old Norse vindr (Swedish vind), Gothic ???????????????????? (winds). The Indo-European root is also the source of Latin ventus (French vent), Welsh gwynt, Tocharian A want, Tocharian B yente.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /wind/

Noun

wind m

  1. wind
  2. flatulence

Declension

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Middle English: wynd, wend, wende, wind, winde, wynde
    • English: wind
    • Scots: wind, win
    • Yola: wyeene, weend

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