flavor vs nip what difference

what is difference between flavor and nip

English

Alternative forms

  • flavour (British spelling)

Etymology

From Middle English flavour meaning “smell, odour”, usually pleasing, borrowed from Old French flaour (smell, odour), from Vulgar Latin *flātor (odour, that which blows), from Latin flātor (blower), from flō, flāre (to blow, puff).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈfleɪvə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈfleɪvɚ/
  • Rhymes: -eɪvə(ɹ)

Noun

flavor (countable and uncountable, plural flavors) (American spelling)

  1. The quality produced by the sensation of taste or, especially, of taste and smell in combined effect.
    The flavor of this apple pie is delicious.
  2. A substance used to produce a taste. Flavoring.
    Flavor was added to the pudding.
  3. A variety (of taste) attributed to an object.
    What flavor of bubble gum do you enjoy?
  4. The characteristic quality of something.
    the flavor of an experience
  5. (informal) A kind or type.
    Debian is one flavor of the Linux operating system.
  6. (particle physics) One of the six types of quarks (top, bottom, strange, charmed, up, and down) or three types of leptons (electron, muon, and tauon).
  7. (archaic) The quality produced by the sensation of smell; odour; fragrance.
    the flavor of a rose
    • (Can we clean up(+) this sense?)

Translations

Verb

flavor (third-person singular simple present flavors, present participle flavoring, simple past and past participle flavored)

  1. (American spelling, transitive) To add flavoring to something.

Translations

Derived terms

See also

  • gustatory
  • gustation


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: nĭp, IPA(key): /nɪp/
  • Rhymes: -ɪp

Etymology 1

Short for nipperkin, ultimately from Middle Low German nippen or Middle Dutch nipen (“to sip; nip”; > Dutch nippen). Compare also German nippen (to sip; taste).

Noun

nip (plural nips)

  1. A small quantity of something edible or a potable liquor.
    Synonyms: (of food) nibble, (specifically of alcohol) a little of the creature; see also Thesaurus:drink

Etymology 2

Clipping of nipple.

Noun

nip (plural nips)

  1. (slang, vulgar) A nipple, usually of a woman.

Etymology 3

From late Middle English nippen, probably of Low German or Dutch origin, probably a byform of earlier *knippen (suggested by the derivative Middle English knippette (pincers)), ultimately from Proto-Germanic *knīpaną (to pinch); related to Dutch nijpen, knijpen (to pinch), Danish nive (pinch); Swedish nypa (pinch); Low German knipen; German kneipen and kneifen (to pinch, cut off, nip), Old Norse hnippa (to prod, poke); Lithuanian knebti.

Verb

nip (third-person singular simple present nips, present participle nipping, simple past and past participle nipped)

  1. To catch and enclose or compress tightly between two surfaces, or points which are brought together or closed; to pinch; to close in upon.
  2. To remove by pinching, biting, or cutting with two meeting edges of anything; to clip.
  3. To benumb [e.g., cheeks, fingers, nose] by severe cold.
  4. To blast, as by frost; to check the growth or vigor of; to destroy.
  5. To annoy, as by nipping.
  6. To taunt.
  7. (Scotland, Northern England) To squeeze or pinch.
  8. (obsolete, Britain, thieves’ cant) To steal; especially to cut a purse.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:steal
  9. (obsolete) To affect [one] painfully; to cause physical pain.’
    • 1907, E.M. Forster, The Longest Journey, Part I, XII [Uniform ed., p. 136]:
      He had never expected to fling the soldier, or to be flung by Flea. “One nips or is nipped,” he thought, “and never knows beforehand. …”

Translations

Noun

nip (plural nips)

  1. A playful bite.
  2. A pinch with the nails or teeth.
  3. Briskly cold weather.
    • 1915, W.S. Maugham, “Of Human Bondage”, chapter 118:
      The day had only just broken, and there was a nip in the air; but the sky was cloudless, and the sun was shining yellow.
  4. A seizing or closing in upon; a pinching
  5. A small cut, or a cutting off the end.
  6. (mining) A more or less gradual thinning out of a stratum.
  7. A blast; a killing of the ends of plants by frost.
  8. A biting sarcasm; a taunt.
  9. (nautical) A short turn in a rope.
  10. (papermaking) The place of intersection where one roll touches another
  11. (obsolete, Britain, thieves’ cant) A pickpocket.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:pickpocket
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 4

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Verb

nip (third-person singular simple present nips, present participle nipping, simple past and past participle nipped)

  1. (informal) To make a quick, short journey or errand, usually a round trip.
    Why don’t you nip down to the grocer’s for some milk?

Anagrams

  • NPI, PIN, pin

Albanian

Etymology

From Proto-Albanian *nepō, from Proto-Indo-European *népōts (grandson, nephew). Cognate to Latin nepos (grandson) and Sanskrit नपात् (nápat-, grandson). Reinforcement/influence or a borrowing from Latin is also possible.

Noun

nip m (indefinite plural nipër, definite singular nipi, definite plural nipërt)

  1. nephew
  2. grandson

Derived terms

See also

  • mbesë

References


Dutch

Pronunciation

Verb

nip

  1. first-person singular present indicative of nippen
  2. imperative of nippen

Anagrams

  • pin

Old Irish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /n͈ʲiːb/

Verb

nip

  1. Alternative spelling of níp

Mutation

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