fleece vs shear what difference

what is difference between fleece and shear

English

Etymology

From Middle English flees, flese, flus, fleos, from Old English flēos, flīes, flȳs, from Proto-West Germanic *fleus.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /fliːs/
  • Rhymes: -iːs

Noun

fleece (countable and uncountable, plural fleeces)

  1. (uncountable) Hair or wool of a sheep or similar animal
  2. (uncountable) Insulating skin with the wool attached
  3. (countable) A textile similar to velvet, but with a longer pile that gives it a softness and a higher sheen.
  4. (countable) An insulating wooly jacket
  5. (roofing) Mat or felts composed of fibers, sometimes used as a membrane backer.
  6. Any soft woolly covering resembling a fleece.
  7. The fine web of cotton or wool removed by the doffing knife from the cylinder of a carding machine.

Derived terms

  • fleeceless
  • fleecewear
  • fleece wool
  • fleecy
  • Golden Fleece

Translations

Verb

fleece (third-person singular simple present fleeces, present participle fleecing, simple past and past participle fleeced)

  1. (transitive) To con or trick (someone) out of money.
  2. (transitive) To shear the fleece from (a sheep or other animal).
  3. (transitive) To cover with, or as if with, wool.

Translations

See also

  • (con): nickel and dime

Finnish

Etymology

Borrowed from English fleece.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfliːsi/, [ˈfliːs̠i]
  • IPA(key): /ˈfliːs/, [ˈfliːs̠] (often in compound terms)

Noun

fleece

  1. Alternative spelling of fliisi

Usage notes

  • As is the case with many loanwords, the inflection of this term is problematic. Kotus recommends “nalle” – category in writing, as shown above, but in speech the declension usually follows “risti” -category, see the declension table for fliisi.

Declension


Swedish

Etymology

Borrowed from English fleece.

Pronunciation

IPA(key): /fliːs/

Noun

fleece c

  1. polar fleece


English

Etymology

From Middle English sheren, scheren, from Old English sċieran, from Proto-West Germanic *skeran, from Proto-Germanic *skeraną, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)ker- (to cut).

Cognate with West Frisian skeare, Low German scheren, Dutch scheren, German scheren, Danish skære, Norwegian Bokmål skjære, Norwegian Nynorsk skjera, Swedish skära; and (from Indo-European) with Ancient Greek κείρω (keírō, I cut off), Latin caro (flesh), Albanian shqerr (to tear, cut), harr (to cut, to mow), Lithuanian skìrti (separate), Welsh ysgar (separate). See also sharp.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ʃɪə(ɹ)/
    • Rhymes: -ɪə(ɹ)
  • (US) IPA(key): /ʃiɹ/
    • Rhymes: -iɹ
  • (nearsquare merger) IPA(key): /ʃɛə/
    • Rhymes: -ɛə(ɹ)
  • Homophones: sheer, Shia

Verb

shear (third-person singular simple present shears, present participle shearing, simple past sheared or shore, past participle shorn or sheared)

  1. To cut, originally with a sword or other bladed weapon, now usually with shears, or as if using shears.
  2. To remove the fleece from a sheep etc. by clipping.
  3. To cut the hair of (a person).
  4. (physics) To deform because of forces pushing in opposite directions.
  5. (aviation, meteorology, intransitive) (of wind) To change in direction and/or speed.
  6. (mathematics) To transform by displacing every point in a direction parallel to some given line by a distance proportional to the point’s distance from the line.
  7. (mining, intransitive) To make a vertical cut in coal.
  8. (Scotland) To reap, as grain.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Jamieson to this entry?)
  9. (figuratively) To deprive of property; to fleece.

Translations

Noun

shear (countable and uncountable, plural shears)

  1. A cutting tool similar to scissors, but often larger.
    Synonym: shears
    • short of their wool, and naked from the shear
  2. (metalworking) A large machine use for cutting sheet metal.
  3. The act of shearing, or something removed by shearing.
    • 1837, William Youatt, Sheep: Their Breeds, Management, and Diseases
      After the second shearing, he is a two-shear ram; [] at the expiration of another year, he is a three-shear ram; the name always taking its date from the time of shearing.
  4. (physics) Forces that push in opposite directions.
  5. (aviation, meteorology) Wind shear, or an instance thereof.
  6. (mathematics) A transformation that displaces every point in a direction parallel to some given line by a distance proportional to the point’s distance from the line.
  7. (geology) The response of a rock to deformation usually by compressive stress, resulting in particular textures.

Derived terms

  • megashear
  • shearer
  • shearography
  • shearwater
  • wind shear

Translations

Adjective

shear

  1. Misspelling of sheer.

Anagrams

  • Asher, Rahes, Share, asher, earsh, hares, harse, hears, heras, rheas, sehar, sehra, share

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