fleece vs wool what difference

what is difference between fleece and wool

English

Etymology

From Middle English flees, flese, flus, fleos, from Old English flēos, flīes, flȳs, from Proto-West Germanic *fleus.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /fliːs/
  • Rhymes: -iːs

Noun

fleece (countable and uncountable, plural fleeces)

  1. (uncountable) Hair or wool of a sheep or similar animal
  2. (uncountable) Insulating skin with the wool attached
  3. (countable) A textile similar to velvet, but with a longer pile that gives it a softness and a higher sheen.
  4. (countable) An insulating wooly jacket
  5. (roofing) Mat or felts composed of fibers, sometimes used as a membrane backer.
  6. Any soft woolly covering resembling a fleece.
  7. The fine web of cotton or wool removed by the doffing knife from the cylinder of a carding machine.

Derived terms

  • fleeceless
  • fleecewear
  • fleece wool
  • fleecy
  • Golden Fleece

Translations

Verb

fleece (third-person singular simple present fleeces, present participle fleecing, simple past and past participle fleeced)

  1. (transitive) To con or trick (someone) out of money.
  2. (transitive) To shear the fleece from (a sheep or other animal).
  3. (transitive) To cover with, or as if with, wool.

Translations

See also

  • (con): nickel and dime

Finnish

Etymology

Borrowed from English fleece.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfliːsi/, [ˈfliːs̠i]
  • IPA(key): /ˈfliːs/, [ˈfliːs̠] (often in compound terms)

Noun

fleece

  1. Alternative spelling of fliisi

Usage notes

  • As is the case with many loanwords, the inflection of this term is problematic. Kotus recommends “nalle” – category in writing, as shown above, but in speech the declension usually follows “risti” -category, see the declension table for fliisi.

Declension


Swedish

Etymology

Borrowed from English fleece.

Pronunciation

IPA(key): /fliːs/

Noun

fleece c

  1. polar fleece


English

Etymology

From Middle English wolle, from Old English wull, from Proto-Germanic *wullō (cognate with Saterland Frisian Wulle, German Low German Wull, Dutch wol, German Wolle, Norwegian ull), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂wĺ̥h₁neh₂ (compare Welsh gwlân, Latin lāna, Lithuanian vìlna, Russian во́лос (vólos), Bulgarian влас (vlas), Albanian lesh (wool, hair, fleece)). Doublet of lana.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /wʊl/
  • (General American) enPR: wo͝ol, IPA(key): /wʊl/, [wʊ̠ɫ], [wɫ̩]
  • Rhymes: -ʊl

Noun

wool (usually uncountable, plural wools)

  1. The hair of the sheep, llama and some other ruminants.
    • 2006, Nigel Guy Wilson, Ancient Greece, page 692
      The sheep were caught and plucked, because shears had not yet been invented to cut the wool from the sheep’s back.
  2. A cloth or yarn made from the wool of sheep.
  3. Anything with a texture like that of wool.
    • 1975, Anthony Julian Huxley, Plant and Planet, page 223
      The groundsels have leaves covered in wool for insulation []
  4. A fine fiber obtained from the leaves of certain trees, such as firs and pines.
  5. (obsolete) Short, thick hair, especially when crisped or curled.
  6. (Britain, New Zealand) yarn (including that which is made from synthetic fibers.)
  7. (Liverpudlian) Derogatory term for residents of the satellite towns outside Liverpool, such as St Helens or Warrington. See also Yonner.

Hyponyms

  • (cloth or yarn): felt, tweed, worsted

Coordinate terms

  • (hair of sheep): goathair, horsehair, qiviut

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Japanese: ウール (ūru)

Translations

See also

  • wool on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Cornish

Noun

wool

  1. Soft mutation of gool.

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