fleet vs flit what difference

what is difference between fleet and flit

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /fliːt/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /flit/
  • Rhymes: -iːt

Etymology 1

From Middle English flete, flet (fleet), from Old English flēot (ship), likely related to Proto-Germanic *flutōną (to float).

Noun

fleet (plural fleets)

  1. A group of vessels or vehicles.
  2. Any group of associated items.
    • 2004, Jim Hoskins, Building an on Demand Computing Environment with IBM:
      This is especially true in distributed printing environments, where a fleet of printers is shared by users on a network.
  3. A large, coordinated group of people.
  4. (nautical) A number of vessels in company, especially war vessels; also, the collective naval force of a country, etc.
  5. (nautical, British Royal Navy) Any command of vessels exceeding a squadron in size, or a rear admiral’s command, composed of five sail-of-the-line, with any number of smaller vessels.
Alternative forms
  • fleete (obsolete)
Derived terms
  • fleet in being
  • merchant fleet
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English flete, flete (bay, gulf), from Old English flēot (a bay, gulf, an arm of the sea, estuary, the mouth of a river). Cognate with Dutch vliet (stream, river, creek, inlet), German Fleet (watercourse, canal).

Noun

fleet (plural fleets)

  1. (dialectal, obsolete outside of place names) An arm of the sea; a run of water, such as an inlet or a creek.
    • 1723, John Lewis, The History and Antiquities, Ecclesiastical and Civil, of the Isle of Tenet in Kent
      a certain Flete […] through which little Boats used to come to the aforesaid Town
    • 1628, A. Matthewes (translator), Aminta (originally by Torquato Tasso)
      Together wove we nets to entrap the fish
      In floods and sedgy fleets.
  2. (nautical) A location, as on a navigable river, where barges are secured.

Derived terms

Etymology 3

From Middle English fleten (float), from Old English flēotan (float), from Proto-Germanic *fleutaną.

Verb

fleet (third-person singular simple present fleets, present participle fleeting, simple past and past participle fleeted)

  1. (obsolete, intransitive) To float.
    • c. 1606-07, William Shakespeare, Antony and Cleopatra, Act III scene xi[2]:
      Antony: Our force by land / Hath nobly held; our sever’d navy too, / Have knit again, and fleet, threat’ning most sea-like.
  2. (transitive) To pass over rapidly; to skim the surface of.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spenser to this entry?)
  3. (transitive, intransitive) To hasten over; to cause to pass away lightly, or in mirth and joy.
    • c. 1599, William Shakespeare, As You Like It, Act I scene i[3]:
      They say he is already in the Forest of Arden, and a many merry men with him; and there they live like the old Robin Hood of England. They say many young gentlemen flock to him every day and fleet the time carelessly, as they did in the golden world.
    • 1817-18, Percy Shelley, Rosalind and Helen, lines 626-627:
      And so through this dark world they fleet / Divided, till in death they meet.
  4. (intransitive) To flee, to escape, to speed away.
    • c. 1596-97, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act IV scene i[4]:
      Gratiano:
      O, be thou damn’d, inexecrable dog!
      And for thy life let justice be accused.
      Thou almost makest me waver in my faith,
      To hold opinion with Pythagoras,
      That souls of animals infuse themselves
      Into the trunks of men: thy currish spirit
      Govern’d a wolf, who, hang’d for human slaughter,
      Even from the gallows did his fell soul fleet,
      And, whilst thou lay’st in thy unhallow’d dam,
      Infused itself in thee; for thy desires
      Are wolfish, bloody, starved, and ravenous.
  5. (intransitive) To evanesce, disappear, die out.
    • c. 1596-97, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act III scene ii:
      Portia:
      How all other passions fleet to air,
      As doubtful thoughts, and rash-embraced despair,
      And shuddering fear, and green-eyed jealousy!
      O love, be moderate; allay thy ecstasy;
      In measure rain thy joy; scant this excess!
      I feel too much thy blessing; make it less,
      For fear I surfeit!
  6. (nautical) To move up a rope, so as to haul to more advantage; especially to draw apart the blocks of a tackle.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Totten to this entry?)
  7. (nautical, intransitive, of people) To move or change in position.
    • 1898, Frank T. Bullen, The Cruise of the “Cachalot”
      We got the long “stick” […] down and “fleeted” aft, where it was secured.
  8. (nautical, obsolete) To shift the position of dead-eyes when the shrouds are become too long.
  9. To cause to slip down the barrel of a capstan or windlass, as a rope or chain.
  10. To take the cream from; to skim.

Translations

Adjective

fleet (comparative fleeter or more fleet, superlative fleetest or most fleet)

  1. (literary) Swift in motion; light and quick in going from place to place.
    Synonyms: nimble, fast
    • 1908, Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows:
      […]it was not till the afternoon that they came out on the high-road, their first high-road; and there disaster, fleet and unforeseen, sprang out on them — disaster momentous indeed to their expedition[…]
  2. (uncommon) Light; superficially thin; not penetrating deep, as soil.

Derived terms

  • fleetfoot
  • fleetfooted

Translations

Etymology 4

See flet.

Noun

fleet (plural fleets)

  1. (Yorkshire) Obsolete form of flet (house, floor, large room).
    • 1686, “Lyke Wake Dirge” as printed in The Oxford Book of English Verse (1900) p. 361:
      Fire and fleet and candle-lighte

Anagrams

  • felte, lefte

Middle English

Noun

fleet

  1. Alternative form of flete (bay)


English

Etymology

From Middle English flitten, flytten, from Old Norse flytja (to move), from Proto-Germanic *flutjaną, from Proto-Indo-European *plewd- (to flow; run). Cognate Icelandic flytja, Swedish flytta, Danish flytte, Norwegian flytte, Faroese flyta. Compare also Saterland Frisian flitskje (to rush; run quickly).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /flɪt/
  • Rhymes: -ɪt

Noun

flit (plural flits)

  1. A fluttering or darting movement.
  2. (physics) A particular, unexpected, short lived change of state.
  3. (slang) A homosexual.

Derived terms

  • moonlight flit

Verb

flit (third-person singular simple present flits, present participle flitting, simple past and past participle flitted)

  1. To move about rapidly and nimbly.
    • 1855, Tennyson, Maud:
      A shadow flits before me, / Not thou, but like to thee; []
    • 1912: Edgar Rice Burroughs, Tarzan of the Apes, Chapter 6
      There were many apes with faces similar to his own, and further over in the book he found, under “M,” some little monkeys such as he saw daily flitting through the trees of his primeval forest. But nowhere was pictured any of his own people; in all the book was none that resembled Kerchak, or Tublat, or Kala.
  2. To move quickly from one location to another.
    • 1597, Richard Hooker, Of the Lawes of Ecclesiastical Politie, Chapter 5:
      By their means it became a received opinion, that the souls of men departing this life, do flit out of one body into some other.
  3. (physics) To unpredictably change state for short periods of time.
    My blender flits because the power cord is damaged.
  4. (Britain, dialect) To move house (sometimes a sudden move to avoid debts).
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wright to this entry?)
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Jamieson to this entry?)
    • 1855, Anthony Trollope, The Warden, page 199 →ISBN
      After this manner did the late Warden of Barchester Hospital accomplish his flitting, and change his residence.
    • 1859, George Dasent (tr.), Popular Tales from the Norse, “The Cat on the Dovrefell”:
      [] we can’t give any one house-room just now, for every Christmas Eve such a pack of Trolls come down upon us that we are forced to flit, and haven’t so much as a house over our own heads, to say nothing of lending one to any one else.
  5. To move a tethered animal to a new, grazing location.
  6. To be unstable; to be easily or often moved.
    • the free soul to flitting air resign’d

Related terms

  • dart
  • dash
  • flirt
  • lunge

Translations

Adjective

flit (comparative more flit, superlative most flit)

  1. (poetic, obsolete) Fast, nimble.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, II.iv:
      And in his hand two darts exceeding flit, / And deadly sharpe he held […].

Anagrams

  • ILTF, lift

Norwegian Nynorsk

Noun

flit m (definite singular fliten, uncountable)

  1. form removed with the spelling reform of 2012; superseded by flid m

Scots

Verb

flit (third-person singular present flits, present participle flittin, past flittit, past participle flittit)

  1. To move house.
  2. To flit.

Derived terms

  • munelicht flittin

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Swedish flit, from Middle Low German vlīt, vlît (cognate with German Low German Fliet, Saterland Frisian Fliet, Dutch vlijt, Danish flid, Norwegian Bokmål flid, Norwegian Nynorsk flit, and German Fleiß, Fleiss).

Pronunciation

Noun

flit c

  1. diligence, industriousness, energy
    där flitens lampa brinner

    where [someone] works long hours

Declension

Related terms

  • flitbetyg
  • flitig
  • flitpengar

References

  • flit in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)
  • flit in Svenska Akademiens ordbok (SAOB)

Anagrams

  • filt

Westrobothnian

Noun

flit m (definite flitn, dative flitåm)

  1. Fly-Tox (insecticide)

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