fleet vs pass what difference

what is difference between fleet and pass

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /fliːt/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /flit/
  • Rhymes: -iːt

Etymology 1

From Middle English flete, flet (fleet), from Old English flēot (ship), likely related to Proto-Germanic *flutōną (to float).

Noun

fleet (plural fleets)

  1. A group of vessels or vehicles.
  2. Any group of associated items.
    • 2004, Jim Hoskins, Building an on Demand Computing Environment with IBM:
      This is especially true in distributed printing environments, where a fleet of printers is shared by users on a network.
  3. A large, coordinated group of people.
  4. (nautical) A number of vessels in company, especially war vessels; also, the collective naval force of a country, etc.
  5. (nautical, British Royal Navy) Any command of vessels exceeding a squadron in size, or a rear admiral’s command, composed of five sail-of-the-line, with any number of smaller vessels.
Alternative forms
  • fleete (obsolete)
Derived terms
  • fleet in being
  • merchant fleet
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English flete, flete (bay, gulf), from Old English flēot (a bay, gulf, an arm of the sea, estuary, the mouth of a river). Cognate with Dutch vliet (stream, river, creek, inlet), German Fleet (watercourse, canal).

Noun

fleet (plural fleets)

  1. (dialectal, obsolete outside of place names) An arm of the sea; a run of water, such as an inlet or a creek.
    • 1723, John Lewis, The History and Antiquities, Ecclesiastical and Civil, of the Isle of Tenet in Kent
      a certain Flete […] through which little Boats used to come to the aforesaid Town
    • 1628, A. Matthewes (translator), Aminta (originally by Torquato Tasso)
      Together wove we nets to entrap the fish
      In floods and sedgy fleets.
  2. (nautical) A location, as on a navigable river, where barges are secured.

Derived terms

Etymology 3

From Middle English fleten (float), from Old English flēotan (float), from Proto-Germanic *fleutaną.

Verb

fleet (third-person singular simple present fleets, present participle fleeting, simple past and past participle fleeted)

  1. (obsolete, intransitive) To float.
    • c. 1606-07, William Shakespeare, Antony and Cleopatra, Act III scene xi[2]:
      Antony: Our force by land / Hath nobly held; our sever’d navy too, / Have knit again, and fleet, threat’ning most sea-like.
  2. (transitive) To pass over rapidly; to skim the surface of.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spenser to this entry?)
  3. (transitive, intransitive) To hasten over; to cause to pass away lightly, or in mirth and joy.
    • c. 1599, William Shakespeare, As You Like It, Act I scene i[3]:
      They say he is already in the Forest of Arden, and a many merry men with him; and there they live like the old Robin Hood of England. They say many young gentlemen flock to him every day and fleet the time carelessly, as they did in the golden world.
    • 1817-18, Percy Shelley, Rosalind and Helen, lines 626-627:
      And so through this dark world they fleet / Divided, till in death they meet.
  4. (intransitive) To flee, to escape, to speed away.
    • c. 1596-97, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act IV scene i[4]:
      Gratiano:
      O, be thou damn’d, inexecrable dog!
      And for thy life let justice be accused.
      Thou almost makest me waver in my faith,
      To hold opinion with Pythagoras,
      That souls of animals infuse themselves
      Into the trunks of men: thy currish spirit
      Govern’d a wolf, who, hang’d for human slaughter,
      Even from the gallows did his fell soul fleet,
      And, whilst thou lay’st in thy unhallow’d dam,
      Infused itself in thee; for thy desires
      Are wolfish, bloody, starved, and ravenous.
  5. (intransitive) To evanesce, disappear, die out.
    • c. 1596-97, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act III scene ii:
      Portia:
      How all other passions fleet to air,
      As doubtful thoughts, and rash-embraced despair,
      And shuddering fear, and green-eyed jealousy!
      O love, be moderate; allay thy ecstasy;
      In measure rain thy joy; scant this excess!
      I feel too much thy blessing; make it less,
      For fear I surfeit!
  6. (nautical) To move up a rope, so as to haul to more advantage; especially to draw apart the blocks of a tackle.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Totten to this entry?)
  7. (nautical, intransitive, of people) To move or change in position.
    • 1898, Frank T. Bullen, The Cruise of the “Cachalot”
      We got the long “stick” […] down and “fleeted” aft, where it was secured.
  8. (nautical, obsolete) To shift the position of dead-eyes when the shrouds are become too long.
  9. To cause to slip down the barrel of a capstan or windlass, as a rope or chain.
  10. To take the cream from; to skim.

Translations

Adjective

fleet (comparative fleeter or more fleet, superlative fleetest or most fleet)

  1. (literary) Swift in motion; light and quick in going from place to place.
    Synonyms: nimble, fast
    • 1908, Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows:
      […]it was not till the afternoon that they came out on the high-road, their first high-road; and there disaster, fleet and unforeseen, sprang out on them — disaster momentous indeed to their expedition[…]
  2. (uncommon) Light; superficially thin; not penetrating deep, as soil.

Derived terms

  • fleetfoot
  • fleetfooted

Translations

Etymology 4

See flet.

Noun

fleet (plural fleets)

  1. (Yorkshire) Obsolete form of flet (house, floor, large room).
    • 1686, “Lyke Wake Dirge” as printed in The Oxford Book of English Verse (1900) p. 361:
      Fire and fleet and candle-lighte

Anagrams

  • felte, lefte

Middle English

Noun

fleet

  1. Alternative form of flete (bay)


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɑːs/
    • (Received Pronunciation, General South African) IPA(key): [pʰɑːs]
    • (General Australian, General New Zealand) IPA(key): [pʰäːs], [pʰɐːs]
    • (Boston) IPA(key): [pʰaːs]
  • IPA(key): /pæs/
    • (General American, Canada) IPA(key): [pʰæs], [pʰɛəs], [pʰeəs]
    • (Ireland, Northern England) IPA(key): [pʰas], [pʰæs]
    • (Scotland) IPA(key): [pʰäs]
    • (NYC) IPA(key): [pʰeə̯s]
  • Rhymes: -æs, -ɑːs
  • Hyphenation: pass

Etymology 1

From Middle English passen, from Old French passer (to step, walk, pass), from *Vulgar Latin passāre (step, walk, pass), from Latin passus (a step), pandere (to spread, unfold, stretch), from Proto-Indo-European *pth₂noh₂, from Proto-Indo-European *peth₂- (to spread, stretch out). Cognate with Old English fæþm (armful, fathom). More at fathom.

Alternative forms

  • passe (obsolete)

Verb

pass (third-person singular simple present passes, present participle passing, simple past and past participle passed)

  1. To change place.
    1. (intransitive) To move or be moved from one place to another.
      Synonyms: go, move
    2. (transitive) To go past, by, over, or through; to proceed from one side to the other of; to move past.
      Synonyms: overtake, pass by, pass over
    3. (ditransitive) To cause to move or go; to send; to transfer from one person, place, or condition to another.
      Synonyms: deliver, give, hand, make over, send, transfer, transmit
      • I had only time to pass my eye over the medals.
    4. (intransitive, transitive, medicine) To eliminate (something) from the body by natural processes.
      Synonyms: evacuate, void
    5. (transitive, nautical) To take a turn with (a line, gasket, etc.), as around a sail in furling, and make secure.
    6. (sports) to make a movement
      1. (transitive, soccer) To kick (the ball) with precision rather than at full force.
        • 20 June 2010, The Guardian, Rob Smyth
          Iaquinta passes it coolly into the right-hand corner as Paston dives the other way.
      2. (transitive) To move (the ball or puck) to a teammate.
      3. (intransitive, fencing) To make a lunge or swipe.
        Synonym: thrust
      4. (intransitive, American football) To throw the ball, generally downfield, towards a teammate.
    7. (intransitive) To go from one person to another.
    8. (transitive) To put in circulation; to give currency to.
      Synonyms: circulate, pass around
    9. (transitive) To cause to obtain entrance, admission, or conveyance.
      Synonyms: admit, let in, let past
    10. (transitive, cooking) To put through a sieve.
  2. To change in state or status
    1. (intransitive) To progress from one state to another; to advance.
    2. (intransitive) To depart, to cease, to come to an end.
      • Beauty’s a charm, but soon the charm will pass.
      • 1995, Penny Richards, The Greatest Gift of All:
        The crisis passed as she’d prayed it would, but it remained to be seen just how much damage had been done.
    3. (intransitive) To die.
      Synonyms: pass away, pass on, pass over; see also Thesaurus:die
    4. (intransitive, transitive) To achieve a successful outcome from.
    5. (intransitive, transitive) To advance through all the steps or stages necessary to become valid or effective; to obtain the formal sanction of (a legislative body).
      Synonyms: be accepted by, be passed by
    6. (intransitive, law) To be conveyed or transferred by will, deed, or other instrument of conveyance.
    7. (transitive) To cause to advance by stages of progress; to carry on with success through an ordeal, examination, or action; specifically, to give legal or official sanction to; to ratify; to enact; to approve as valid and just.
      Synonyms: approve, enact, ratify
    8. (intransitive, law) To make a judgment on or upon a person or case.
      • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte d’Arthur, Book X:
        And within three dayes twelve knyghtes passed uppon hem; and they founde Sir Palomydes gylty, and Sir Saphir nat gylty, of the lordis deth.
    9. (transitive) To utter; to pronounce; to pledge.
      Synonyms: pronounce, say, speak, utter
      • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost
        Father, thy word is passed.
    10. (intransitive) To change from one state to another (without the implication of progression).
  3. To move through time.
    1. (intransitive, of time) To elapse, to be spent.
      Synonyms: elapse, go by; see also Thesaurus:elapse
    2. (transitive, of time) To spend.
      • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost
        To pass commodiously this life.
    3. (transitive) To go by without noticing; to omit attention to; to take no note of; to disregard.
      Synonyms: disregard, ignore, take no notice of; see also Thesaurus:ignore
      • I pass their warlike pomp, their proud array.
    4. (intransitive) To continue.
      Synonyms: continue, go on
    5. (intransitive) To proceed without hindrance or opposition.
    6. (transitive) To live through; to have experience of; to undergo; to suffer.
      Synonyms: bear, endure, suffer, tolerate, undergo; see also Thesaurus:tolerate
    7. (intransitive) To happen.
      Synonyms: happen, occur; see also Thesaurus:happen
      • 1876, The Dilemma, Chapter LIII, republished in Littell’s Living Age, series 5, volume 14, page 274:
        [] for the memory of what passed while at that place is almost blank.
  4. To be accepted.
    1. (intransitive) To be tolerated as a substitute for something else, to “do”.
    2. (sociology) To be accepted by others as a member of a race, sex or other group to which they would not otherwise regard one as belonging (or belonging fully, without qualifier); especially to live and be known as white although one has black ancestry, or to live and be known as female although one was assigned male or vice versa.
  5. To refrain from doing something.
    1. (intransitive) To decline something that is offered or available.
      Coordinate terms: pass on, pass up
    2. (intransitive) To decline or not attempt to answer a question.
    3. (intransitive) In turn-based games, to decline to play in one’s turn.
    4. (intransitive, card games) In euchre, to decline to make the trump.
  6. To do or be better.
    1. (intransitive, obsolete) To go beyond bounds; to surpass; to be in excess.
      Synonyms: exceed, surpass
    2. (transitive) To transcend; to surpass; to excel; to exceed.
      Synonyms: better, exceed, excel, outdo, surpass, transcend; see also Thesaurus:exceed
  7. (intransitive, obsolete) To take heed.
    Synonyms: take heed, take notice; see also Thesaurus:pay attention
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English pas, pase, pace, from passen (to pass).

Noun

pass (plural passes)

  1. An opening, road, or track, available for passing; especially, one through or over some dangerous or otherwise impracticable barrier such as a mountain range; a passageway; a defile; a ford.
    Synonyms: gap, notch
  2. A channel connecting a river or body of water to the sea, for example at the mouth (delta) of a river.
  3. A single movement, especially of a hand, at, over, or along anything.
    • 1921, John Griffin, “Trailing the Grizzly in Oregon”, in Forest and Stream, pages 389-391 and 421-424, republished by Jeanette Prodgers in 1997 in The Only Good Bear is a Dead Bear, page 35:
      [The bear] made a pass at the dog, but he swung out and above him []
  4. A single passage of a tool over something, or of something over a tool.
    Synonym: transit
  5. An attempt.
  6. Success in an examination or similar test.
  7. (fencing) A thrust or push; an attempt to stab or strike an adversary.
    Synonym: thrust
  8. (figuratively) A thrust; a sally of wit.
  9. A sexual advance.
  10. (sports) The act of moving the ball or puck from one player to another.
  11. (rail transport) A passing of two trains in the same direction on a single track, when one is put into a siding to let the other overtake it.
    Antonym: meet
  12. Permission or license to pass, or to go and come.
    • 1826, James Kent, Commentaries on American Law
      A ship sailing under the flag and pass of an enemy.
    Synonyms: access, admission, entry
  13. A document granting permission to pass or to go and come; a passport; a ticket permitting free transit or admission
  14. (baseball) An intentional walk.
  15. (sports) The act of overtaking; an overtaking manoeuvre.
  16. The state of things; condition; predicament; impasse.
    • Matters have been brought to this pass, that, if one among a man’s sons had any blemish, he laid him aside for the ministry…
    Synonyms: condition, predicament, state
  17. (obsolete) Estimation; character.
  18. (obsolete, Chaucer) A part, a division. Compare passus.
  19. (cooking) The area in a restaurant kitchen where the finished dishes are passed from the chefs to the waiting staff.
  20. An act of declining to play one’s turn in a game, often by saying the word “pass”.
  21. (computing) A run through a document as part of a translation, compilation or reformatting process.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 3

Short for password.

Noun

pass (plural passes)

  1. (computing, slang) A password (especially one for a restricted-access website).
    • 1999, “Jonny Durango”, IMPORTANT NEWS FOR AHM IRC CHAN!!! (on newsgroup alt.hackers.malicious)
      If you don’t have your password set within a week I’ll remove you from the userlist and I’ll add you again next time I see you in the chan and make sure you set a pass.
Translations

Further reading

  • pass in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • pass in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • pass at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • APSS, ASPs, PSAS, PSAs, SAPs, asps, saps, spas

Faroese

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [pʰasː]

Noun

pass n (genitive singular pass, plural pass)

  1. passport

Declension


German

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -as

Verb

pass

  1. singular imperative of passen

Lombard

Etymology

From Latin passus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [pas]

Noun

pass ?

  1. step
  2. mountain pass

Norwegian Bokmål

Noun

pass n (definite singular passet, indefinite plural pass, definite plural passa or passene)

  1. a passport (travel document)
  2. a pass (fjellpass – mountain pass)

Derived terms

  • barnepass (from the verb passe)
  • fjellpass
  • passbilde
  • passfoto

Verb

pass

  1. imperative of passe

References

  • “pass” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Noun

pass n (definite singular passet, indefinite plural pass, definite plural passa)

  1. a passport (travel document)
  2. a pass, mountain pass

Derived terms

  • barnepass (from the verb passe)
  • fjellpass
  • passbilde, passbilete
  • passfoto

References

  • “pass” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Swedish

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From German, originally from Italian passo

Noun

pass n

  1. passport (document granting permission to pass)
  2. place which you (must) pass or is passing; mountain pass
  3. pace; a kind of gait
  4. place where a hunter hunts; place where a policeman patrols
  5. spell (a period of duty); shift
  6. leave notice (document granting permission to leave) (from prison)
Declension
Synonyms
  • genomfart, överfart, passage
  • leave notice: permissionssedel, permissionspass
Derived terms
  • passa
  • passlig
  • till pass

Etymology 2

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

pass c

  1. (ball sports) pass; a transfer of the ball from one player to another in the same team
Declension
Synonyms
  • passning
Derived terms

Anagrams

  • asps

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