flexure vs fold what difference

what is difference between flexure and fold

English

Etymology

From Latin flexura.

Noun

flexure (countable and uncountable, plural flexures)

  1. The act of bending or flexing; flexion.
  2. A turn; a bend; a fold; a curve.
    • British Quarterly Review
      varying with the flexures of the valley through which it meandered
  3. (anatomy) A curve or bend in a tubular organ.
  4. (zoology) The last joint, or bend, of the wing of a bird.
  5. (astronomy) The small distortion of an astronomical instrument caused by the weight of its parts; the amount to be added or subtracted from the observed readings of the instrument to correct them for this distortion.

Related terms

  • flex
  • flexural
  • flexion

Translations

References

  • The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition (2000).

Latin

Participle

flexūre

  1. vocative masculine singular of flexūrus


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /fəʊld/
  • (General American) enPR: fōld, IPA(key): /foʊld/
  • Homophone: foaled
  • Rhymes: -əʊld

Etymology 1

From Middle English folden, from Old English fealdan, from Proto-Germanic *falþaną (to fold), from Proto-Indo-European *pel- (to fold).

Verb

fold (third-person singular simple present folds, present participle folding, simple past folded, past participle folded or (obsolete) folden)

  1. (transitive) To bend (any thin material, such as paper) over so that it comes in contact with itself.
  2. (transitive) To make the proper arrangement (in a thin material) by bending.
  3. (intransitive) To become folded; to form folds.
  4. (intransitive, informal) To fall over; to be crushed.
  5. (transitive) To enclose within folded arms (see also enfold).
    • 1897, Bram Stoker, Dracula Chapter 21
      He put out his arms and folded her to his breast. And for a while she lay there sobbing. He looked at us over her bowed head, with eyes that blinked damply above his quivering nostrils. His mouth was set as steel.
  6. (intransitive) To give way on a point or in an argument.
  7. (intransitive, poker) To withdraw from betting.
  8. (intransitive, by extension) To withdraw or quit in general.
  9. (transitive, cooking) To stir gently, with a folding action.
    • 8 Jan 2020, Felicity Cloake in The Guardian, How to make the perfect gluten-free chocolate brownies – recipe
      if you want to make life really easy for yourself, may I point you in the direction of Sunflour’s recipe, which folds four eggs and 150g ground almonds into 500g chocolate spread.
  10. (intransitive, business) Of a company, to cease to trade.
  11. To double or lay together, as the arms or the hands.
  12. To cover or wrap up; to conceal.
Synonyms
  • (bend (thin material) over): bend, crease
  • (fall over): fall over
  • (give way on a point or in an argument): concede, give in, give way, yield
Antonyms
  • unfold
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Czech: foldovat
Translations

Noun

fold (plural folds)

  1. An act of folding.
    Synonyms: bending, creasing
  2. A bend or crease.
    Synonyms: bend, crease
    • 1863, James Dwight Dana, Manual of Geology
      The folds are most abrupt to the eastward ; to the west , they diminish in boldness , and become gentle undulations
  3. Any correct move in origami.
  4. (newspapers) The division between the top and bottom halves of a broadsheet: headlines above the fold will be readable in a newsstand display; usually the fold.
    • 2007, Jennifer Niederst Robbins, Learning Web Design: A Beginner’s Guide to (X)HTML, StyleSheets, and Web Graphics, “O’Reilly Media, Inc.” (→ISBN), page 43:
      Newspaper editors know the importance of putting the most important information “above the fold,” that is, visible when the paper is folded and on the rack.
  5. (by extension, web design) The division between the part of a web page visible in a web browser window without scrolling; usually the fold.
    • 1999, Jared M. Spool, Web Site Usability: A Designer’s Guide, Morgan Kaufmann (→ISBN), page 77:
      For example, a story that is “page I, above the fold” is considered very important news. In web page design, the fold signifies the place at which the user has to scroll down to get more information.
  6. That which is folded together, or which enfolds or envelops; embrace.
  7. (geology) The bending or curving of one or a stack of originally flat and planar surfaces, such as sedimentary strata, as a result of plastic (i.e. permanent) deformation.
  8. (computing theory) In functional programming, any of a family of higher-order functions that process a data structure recursively to build up a value.
    • 2010, Richard Bird, Pearls of Functional Algorithm Design, Cambridge University Press (→ISBN), page 168:
      It was Erik Meijer who coined the name hylomorphism to describe a computation that consists of a fold after an unfold. The unfold produces a data structure and the fold consumes it.
  9. (programming) A section of source code that can be collapsed out of view in an editor to aid readability.
Derived terms
  • above the fold
  • below the fold
  • centrefold, centerfold
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English fold, fald, from Old English fald, falæd, falod (fold, stall, stable, cattle-pen), from Proto-Germanic *faludaz (enclosure). Akin to Scots fald, fauld (an enclosure for livestock), Dutch vaalt (dung heap), Middle Low German valt, vālt (an inclosed space, a yard), Danish fold (pen for herbivorous livestock), Swedish fålla (corral, pen, pound).

Noun

fold (plural folds)

  1. A pen or enclosure for sheep or other domestic animals.
    Synonyms: enclosure, pen, penfold, pinfold
  2. (collective) A group of sheep or goats.
    Synonym: flock
  3. (figuratively) Home, family.
    Synonyms: home, family
  4. (religion, Christian) A church congregation, a group of people who adhere to a common faith and habitually attend a given church; the Christian church as a whole, the flock of Christ.
    Synonyms: congregation, flock
    • Other sheep I have which are not of this fold.
  5. A group of people with shared ideas or goals or who live or work together.
    Synonym: cohort
    • 2013, Phil McNulty, “[2]”, BBC Sport, 1 September 2013:
      Having suffered the loss of Rooney just as he had returned to the fold, Moyes’ mood will not have improved as Liverpool took the lead in the third minute.
  6. (obsolete) A boundary or limit.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Creech to this entry?)
Translations

Verb

fold (third-person singular simple present folds, present participle folding, simple past and past participle folded)

  1. To confine animals in a fold.

Etymology 3

From Middle English, from Old English folde (earth, land, country, district, region, territory, ground, soil, clay), from Proto-Germanic *fuldǭ, *fuldō (earth, ground; field; the world). Cognate with Old Norse fold (earth, land, field), Norwegian and Icelandic fold (land, earth, meadow).

Noun

fold (uncountable)

  1. (dialectal, poetic or obsolete) The Earth; earth; land, country.

Anagrams

  • FLOD

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɔl/, [fʌlˀ]
  • Rhymes: -ɒl

Etymology 1

from Old Norse faldr (seam).

Noun

fold c (singular definite folden, plural indefinite folder)

  1. fold
  2. crease
  3. wrinkle
Inflection

Etymology 2

From Old Danish fald, from Middle Low German valde, from Old Saxon *faled, from Proto-Germanic *faludaz.

Noun

fold c (singular definite folden, plural indefinite folde)

  1. fold, pen
Inflection

Etymology 3

From Old Norse -faldr

Noun

fold n

  1. multiple

Etymology 4

See folde (to fold).

Verb

fold

  1. imperative of folde

See also

  • fold on the Danish Wikipedia.Wikipedia da

Icelandic

Etymology

From Old Norse fold.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [fɔlt]
  • Rhymes: -ɔlt

Noun

fold f (genitive singular foldar, nominative plural foldir)

  1. (poetic) earth, ground, land

Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

fold

  1. imperative of folde

Old Norse

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *fuldō (earth, ground; field; the world).

Noun

fold f

  1. (poetic) earth, land; field
    • 9th c., Þjóðólfr of Hvinir, Ynglingatal, verse 5:
    • 900-1100, The Alvíssmál, verses 9 and 10:

Declension

Descendants

  • Icelandic: fold
  • Norwegian:
    • Norwegian Bokmål: Vestfold, Østfold
    • Norwegian Nynorsk: Vestfold, Østfold

References

  • fold in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

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