flick vs riffle what difference

what is difference between flick and riffle

English

Etymology

Perhaps related to flicker.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /flɪk/
  • Rhymes: -ɪk
    Homophone: flic

Noun

flick (plural flicks)

  1. A short, quick movement, especially a brush, sweep, or flip.
  2. (informal) A motion picture, movie, film; (in plural, usually preceded by “the”) movie theater, cinema.
  3. (fencing) A cut that lands with the point, often involving a whip of the foible of the blade to strike at a concealed target.
  4. (tennis) A powerful underarm volley shot.
  5. The act of pressing a place on a touch screen device.
  6. A flitch.
  7. A unit of time, equal to 1/705,600,000 of a second
  8. (dated, slang) A chap or fellow; sometimes as a friendly term of address.
    • 1920, H. C. McNeile, Bulldog Drummond
      ‘All that I have, dear old flick, is yours for the asking. What can I do?’

Synonyms

  • (short, quick movement) fillip (of the finger)
  • (cinema) the pictures

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: fliek

Translations

Verb

flick (third-person singular simple present flicks, present participle flicking, simple past and past participle flicked)

  1. To move or hit (something) with a short, quick motion.
    • Using her hands like windshield wipers, she tried to flick snow away from her mouth. When she clawed at her chest and neck, the crumbs maddeningly slid back onto her face. She grew claustrophobic.
    • 1860, William Makepeace Thackeray, The English Humourists of the Eighteenth Century and Charity and Humour
      the Queen, flicking the snuff off her sleeve []

Derived terms

  • flick knife
  • flick off
  • flick the bean

Related terms

  • flicker

Translations


German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /flɪk/
  • Rhymes: -ɪk

Verb

flick

  1. singular imperative of flicken


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɹɪfəl/
  • Rhymes: -ɪfəl

Etymology 1

Possible alteration of ruffle, from Middle English ruffelen, akin to Low German ruffelen (to crumple).

Noun

riffle (plural riffles)

  1. A swift, shallow part of a stream causing broken water.
    • 1903, James Alexander Henshall, Bass, Pike, Perch and other Game Fishes of America
      They then proceeded below the milldam, where there was a strong riffle, with likely looking pools and eddies
    • 2017: “On the Glories of Autumn” by Bill Barich, California Fly Fisher
      The big trout feed aggressively and tend to lose their caution in the rifles.
  2. A succession of small waves.
  3. (mining) A trough or sluice having cleats, grooves, or steps across the bottom for holding quicksilver and catching particles of gold when auriferous earth is washed. Also one of the cleats, grooves or steps in such trough.
  4. A quick skim through the pages of a book.
  5. The act of shuffling cards; the sound made while shuffling cards.
Hyponyms
  • white water
Related terms
  • cheater riffle
Translations

Verb

riffle (third-person singular simple present riffles, present participle riffling, simple past and past participle riffled)

  1. (intransitive) To flow over a swift, shallow part of a stream.
  2. (transitive) To ruffle with a rippling action.
  3. (intransitive) To skim or flick through the pages of a book.
  4. (transitive) To leaf through rapidly.
  5. (transitive) To shuffle playing cards by separating the deck in two and sliding the thumbs along the edges of the cards to mix the two parts.
  6. (transitive) To idly manipulate objects with the fingers.
  7. (transitive) To prepare samples of material using a riffler.

Etymology 2

Danish [Term?] (a groove)

Noun

riffle (plural riffles)

  1. In seal engraving, a small metal disc at the end of a tool.
Derived terms
  • riffler

Anagrams

  • Riffel

German

Verb

riffle

  1. inflection of riffeln:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. first/third-person singular subjunctive I
    3. singular imperative

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