flight vs flying what difference

what is difference between flight and flying

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: flīt, IPA(key): /flaɪt/
  • Rhymes: -aɪt

Etymology 1

From Middle English flight, from Old English flyht (flight), from Proto-Germanic *fluhtiz (flight), derived from *fleuganą (to fly), from Proto-Indo-European *plewk- (to fly), enlargement of *plew- (flow). Analyzable as fly +‎ -t (variant of -th). Cognate with West Frisian flecht (flight), Dutch vlucht (flight), German Flucht (flight) (etymology 2).

Noun

flight (countable and uncountable, plural flights)

  1. The act of flying.
  2. An instance of flying.
  3. (collective) A collective term for doves or swallows.
  4. A trip made by an aircraft, particularly one between two cities or countries, which is often planned or reserved in advance.
  5. A series of stairs between landings.
  6. A group of canal locks with a short distance between them
  7. A floor which is reached by stairs or escalators.
  8. The feathers on an arrow or dart used to help it follow an even path.
  9. A paper airplane. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  10. (cricket) The movement of a spinning ball through the air – concerns its speed, trajectory and drift.
  11. The ballistic trajectory of an arrow or other projectile.
  12. An aerodynamic surface designed to guide such a projectile’s trajectory.
  13. An air force unit.
  14. Several sample glasses of a specific wine varietal or other beverage. The pours are smaller than a full glass and the flight will generally include three to five different samples.
  15. (engineering) The shaped material forming the thread of a screw.

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Adjective

flight (comparative more flight, superlative most flight)

  1. (obsolete) Fast, swift, fleet.

Verb

flight (third-person singular simple present flights, present participle flighting, simple past and past participle flighted)

  1. (cricket, of a spin bowler) To throw the ball in such a way that it has more airtime and more spin than usual.
  2. (sports, by extension, transitive) To throw or kick something so as to send it flying with more loft or airtime than usual.

See also

Appendix:English collective nouns

Etymology 2

From Middle English, from Old English flyht, from Proto-Germanic *fluhtiz, derived from *fleuhaną (to flee). Analyzable as flee +‎ -t (variant of -th). Cognate with Dutch vlucht, German Flucht (etymology 1).

Noun

flight (countable and uncountable, plural flights)

  1. The act of fleeing.
    take flight
    the flight of a refugee
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide
      But the sight of her eyes was not a thing to forget. John Dodds said they were the een of a deer with the Devil ahint them; and indeed, they would so appal an onlooker that a sudden unreasoning terror came into his heart, while his feet would impel him to flight.

Related terms

  • flee

Translations


Middle English

Etymology

From Old English flyht.

Noun

flight (plural flights)

  1. flight (act of flying)


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈflaɪ.ɪŋ/
  • Hyphenation: fly‧ing

Etymology 1

From Middle English fleynge, fleeʒinge, flihinde, vlyinde, vleoinde, flyand,
ffleghand, flighand (also fleoninde, fleonninde, etc.), from Old English flēogende, from Proto-Germanic *fleugandz (flying), present participle of Proto-Germanic *fleuganą (to fly), equivalent to fly +‎ -ing. Cognate with Saterland Frisian fljoogend (flying), West Frisian fleanend (flying), Dutch vliegend (flying), German Low German flegend (flying), German fliegend (flying), Danish flyvende (flying), Swedish flygande (flying), Icelandic fljúgandi (flying).

Adjective

flying (not comparable)

  1. That flies or can fly.
    flying fox
    a flying rumour
    • Matthew (26—6 to 13), Mark (14—3 to 9), and Luke (7—37 and 38) also heard of, and related, the circumstance of Mary, whom John says (11 — 2) was the sister of Lazarus, anointing the head of Jesus with ointment, yet they neither of them utter a syllable about his raising her brother from the dead. It is difficult to account for this fact, unless we suppose that John was actually dishonest, or that he took up, believed and recorded a flying story, which an occurrence of some kind had given rise to, but which was without any foundation in truth.
  2. Brief or hurried.
    flying visit
  3. (nautical, of a sail) Not secured by yards.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

flying

  1. present participle of fly

Etymology 2

From Middle English flyinge, fleyng, fleyinge, fleynge, fleghyng, fleiʒeyng, flyeghynge, equivalent to fly +‎ -ing. Cognate with Danish flyvning (flying), Swedish flygning (flying), Norwegian flyvning, flygning, flyging, flying (flying).

Noun

flying (countable and uncountable, plural flyings)

  1. (countable) An act of flight.
    • 1993, John C. Greene, Gladys L. H. Clark, The Dublin Stage, 1720-1745 (page 58)
      Flyings” could vary considerably in complexity and lavishness and could involve an actor or property being either lifted from the stage into the flies above or vice versa. As Colin Visser has observed, flyings and sinkings are both “associated with supernatural manifestations of various kinds” []
  2. (uncountable) The action or process of sustained motion through the air.
Translations

Anagrams

  • flingy

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