flight vs trajectory what difference

what is difference between flight and trajectory

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: flīt, IPA(key): /flaɪt/
  • Rhymes: -aɪt

Etymology 1

From Middle English flight, from Old English flyht (flight), from Proto-Germanic *fluhtiz (flight), derived from *fleuganą (to fly), from Proto-Indo-European *plewk- (to fly), enlargement of *plew- (flow). Analyzable as fly +‎ -t (variant of -th). Cognate with West Frisian flecht (flight), Dutch vlucht (flight), German Flucht (flight) (etymology 2).

Noun

flight (countable and uncountable, plural flights)

  1. The act of flying.
  2. An instance of flying.
  3. (collective) A collective term for doves or swallows.
  4. A trip made by an aircraft, particularly one between two cities or countries, which is often planned or reserved in advance.
  5. A series of stairs between landings.
  6. A group of canal locks with a short distance between them
  7. A floor which is reached by stairs or escalators.
  8. The feathers on an arrow or dart used to help it follow an even path.
  9. A paper airplane. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  10. (cricket) The movement of a spinning ball through the air – concerns its speed, trajectory and drift.
  11. The ballistic trajectory of an arrow or other projectile.
  12. An aerodynamic surface designed to guide such a projectile’s trajectory.
  13. An air force unit.
  14. Several sample glasses of a specific wine varietal or other beverage. The pours are smaller than a full glass and the flight will generally include three to five different samples.
  15. (engineering) The shaped material forming the thread of a screw.

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Adjective

flight (comparative more flight, superlative most flight)

  1. (obsolete) Fast, swift, fleet.

Verb

flight (third-person singular simple present flights, present participle flighting, simple past and past participle flighted)

  1. (cricket, of a spin bowler) To throw the ball in such a way that it has more airtime and more spin than usual.
  2. (sports, by extension, transitive) To throw or kick something so as to send it flying with more loft or airtime than usual.

See also

Appendix:English collective nouns

Etymology 2

From Middle English, from Old English flyht, from Proto-Germanic *fluhtiz, derived from *fleuhaną (to flee). Analyzable as flee +‎ -t (variant of -th). Cognate with Dutch vlucht, German Flucht (etymology 1).

Noun

flight (countable and uncountable, plural flights)

  1. The act of fleeing.
    take flight
    the flight of a refugee
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide
      But the sight of her eyes was not a thing to forget. John Dodds said they were the een of a deer with the Devil ahint them; and indeed, they would so appal an onlooker that a sudden unreasoning terror came into his heart, while his feet would impel him to flight.

Related terms

  • flee

Translations


Middle English

Etymology

From Old English flyht.

Noun

flight (plural flights)

  1. flight (act of flying)


English

Etymology

From New Latin trāiectōrium, from trāiectōrius (of or pertaining to throwing across), from Latin trāiectus (thrown over or across), past participle of trāiciō, from trans- (across, beyond) (see trans-) + iaciō (to throw) (from Proto-Indo-European *(H)yeh₁- (to throw, impel)). Middle French and Middle English had trajectorie (“end of a funnel”), from Latin trāiectōrium.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tɹəˈdʒɛktəɹɪ/

Noun

trajectory (plural trajectories)

  1. The path an object takes as it moves.
    • 2019, Louise Taylor, Alex Morgan heads USA past England into Women’s World Cup final (in The Guardian, 2 July 2019)[1]
      The USA were dominant but, to England’s immense credit, they repeatedly rallied, refusing to fold. Indeed they could conceivably have gone in level at the interval had Naeher not made an acrobatic, stretching, fingertip save to divert Walsh’s 25-yard thunderbolt as it whizzed unerringly on its apparently inexorable trajectory towards the top corner.
  2. (astronomy, space science) The path of a body as it travels through space.
  3. (cybernetics) The ordered set of intermediate states assumed by a dynamical system as a result of time evolution.
  4. (figuratively) A course of development, such as that of a war or career.

Derived terms

  • (astronomy, space): flyby trajectory

Related terms

  • (cybernetics): run

Translations


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