flip vs throw what difference

what is difference between flip and throw

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /flɪp/
  • Rhymes: -ɪp

Etymology 1

Alteration of earlier fillip, from Middle English filippen (to make a signal or sound with thumb and right forefinger, snap the fingers), an attenuated variation of flappen (to flap, clap, slap, strike). Cognate with Dutch flappen (to flap), German flappen (to flap).

Noun

flip (plural flips)

  1. A maneuver which rotates an object end over end.
    We’ll decide this on a flip of a coin.
    The diver did a couple of flips before landing in the pool.
  2. A complete change of direction, decision, movement etc.
  3. (US, slang) A slingshot.
    • 1986, George Scarbrough, A summer ago (page 123)
      He loaded his flip and took careful aim at what he considered to be Emily’s most vulnerable spot []
  4. A hairstyle popular among boys in the 1960s–70s and 2000s–10s, in which the hair goes halfway down the ears, at which point it sticks out
    Justin Bieber and Zac Efron are among the celebrities who wore a flip.
  5. (informal) The purchase of an asset (usually a house) which is then improved and sold quickly for profit.
    • 2007, Rick Villani, Clay Davis, Gary Keller, Flip: How to Find, Fix, and Sell Houses for Profit (page viii)
      What they bring to the table is hard-won brass-tacks knowledge from over fifteen years of personal investing as well as riding shotgun on over 1,000 flips with their clients.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

flip (third-person singular simple present flips, present participle flipping, simple past and past participle flipped)

  1. (transitive) To throw so as to turn over.
    Synonyms: turn, turn over
  2. (transitive) To put into a quick revolving motion through a snap of the thumb and index finger.
    Synonym: toss
  3. (transitive, US politics) To win a state (or county) won by another party in the preceding elections.
  4. (intransitive, US) To turn state’s evidence; to agree to testify against one’s co-conspirators in exchange for concessions from prosecutors.
  5. (transitive, US) To induce someone to turn state’s evidence; to get someone to agree to testify against their co-conspirators in exchange for concessions.
  6. (intransitive, slang) To go berserk or crazy.
  7. (transitive, informal) To buy an asset (usually a house), improve it and sell it quickly for profit.
  8. (transitive, computing) To invert a bit (binary digit), changing it from 0 to 1 or from 1 to 0.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

Apparently a euphemism for fuck.

Interjection

flip

  1. (Britain, euphemistic) Used to express annoyance, especially when the speaker has made an error.
Synonyms
  • damn
Related terms
  • flipping

Etymology 3

Clipping of flippant

Adjective

flip (comparative flipper, superlative flippest)

  1. (Britain, informal) Having the quality of playfulness, or lacking seriousness of purpose.
    I hate to be flip, but perhaps we could steal a Christmas tree.
  2. Sarcastic.
  3. (informal) Disrespectful, flippant.
    Don’t get flip with me or I’ll knock you into next Tuesday!
Synonyms
  • (disrespectful): see Thesaurus:cheeky

Etymology 4

Compare English dialect flip (nimble, flippant, also, a slight blow).

Noun

flip (uncountable)

  1. A mixture of beer, spirit, etc., stirred and heated by a hot iron (a “flip dog”).
    • 1751, Tobias Smollett, The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle, I.9:
      [H]e had provided vast quantities of strong beer, flip, rumbo, and burnt brandy, with plenty of Barbadoes water for the ladies [] .
    • 1808–10, William Hickey, Memoirs of a Georgian Rake, Folio Society 1995, p. 21:
      I frequently took of large potations, though not of champagne certainly, but port, strong ales, and punch, and when our funds were low as sometimes happened, hot flip [] .

Dutch

Pronunciation

Verb

flip

  1. first-person singular present indicative of flippen
  2. imperative of flippen

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /flip/

Noun

flip m (plural flips)

  1. a type of alcoholic punch from Normandy, composed of cider and calvados
  2. (gymnastics) backflip

Further reading

  • “flip” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).


English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) enPR: thrō, IPA(key): /θɹəʊ/, [θɾ̪̊əʊ]
  • (US) enPR: thrō, IPA(key): /θɹoʊ/, [θɾ̪̊oʊ]
  • Rhymes: -əʊ
  • Homophone: throe

Etymology 1

From Middle English throwen, thrawen, from Old English þrāwan (to turn, twist, curl, rack, torture, turn around), from Proto-West Germanic *þrāan, from Proto-Germanic *þrēaną (to twist, turn), from Proto-Indo-European *terh₁- (to rub, rub by twisting, twist, turn). Cognate with Scots thraw (to twist, turn, throw), West Frisian triuwe (to push), Dutch draaien (to turn), Low German draien, dreien (to turn (in a lathe)), German drehen (to turn), Danish dreje (to turn), Swedish dreja (to turn), Albanian dredh (to turn, twist, tremble), Bulgarian изтърва́вам (iztǎrvávam, to drop).

Verb

throw (third-person singular simple present throws, present participle throwing, simple past threw, past participle thrown)

  1. (transitive) To hurl; to cause an object to move rapidly through the air.
    Synonyms: bowl, bung, buzz, cast, catapult, chuck, dash, direct, fire, fling, flip, heave, hurl, launch, lob, pitch, project, propel, send, shoot, shy, sling, toss, whang
  2. (transitive) To eject or cause to fall off.
    Synonyms: eject, throw off
  3. (transitive) To move to another position or condition; to displace.
    Synonyms: displace, relocate
  4. (ceramics) To make (a pot) by shaping clay as it turns on a wheel.
  5. (transitive, cricket, of a bowler) to deliver (the ball) illegally by straightening the bowling arm during delivery.
  6. (transitive, computing) To send (an error) to an exception-handling mechanism in order to interrupt normal processing.
  7. (sports, video games) To intentionally lose a game.
    • 2012, August 1. Peter Walker and Haroon Siddique in Guardian Unlimited, Eight Olympic badminton players disqualified for ‘throwing games’
      Four pairs of women’s doubles badminton players, including the Chinese top seeds, have been ejected from the Olympic tournament for trying to throw matches in an effort to secure a more favourable quarter-final draw.
    Synonym: take a dive
  8. (transitive, informal) To confuse or mislead.
  9. (figuratively) To send desperately.
  10. (transitive) To imprison.
    • 1818, Mary Shelley, Frankenstein
      The plot of Felix was quickly discovered, and De Lacey and Agatha were thrown into prison.
    • 1993, Margaret McKee, Fred Chisenhall, Beale black & blue: life and music on black America’s main street – Page 30
      The standard method of dealing with an addict was to arrest him, throw him into a cell, and leave him until the agonizing pangs of withdrawal were over.
  11. To organize an event, especially a party.
    • 1979, Working Mother, July 1979, Page 72[1]
      Should you be interested, for whatever reason, it will tell you how to throw a party for your 40-year-old husband or your 100-year-old great-grandmother. It also describes games that can be played at various kinds of parties []
  12. (transitive, intransitive) To roll (a die or dice).
    • 1844, Samuel Laing translating Snorri Sturluson, Heimskringla
      The kings came to the agreement between themselves that they would cast lots by the dice to determine who should have this property, and that he who threw the highest should have the district. The Swedish king threw two sixes, and said King Olaf need scarcely throw.
  13. (transitive) To cause a certain number on the die or dice to be shown after rolling it.
    • 1844, Samuel Laing translating Snorri Sturluson, Heimskringla
      The kings came to the agreement between themselves that they would cast lots by the dice to determine who should have this property, and that he who threw the highest should have the district. The Swedish king threw two sixes, and said King Olaf need scarcely throw.
  14. (transitive, bridge) To discard.
  15. (martial arts) To lift the opponent off the ground and bring him back down, especially into a position behind the thrower.
  16. (transitive, said of one’s voice) To change in order to give the illusion that the voice is that of someone else.
  17. (transitive) To show sudden emotion, especially anger.
    • 1991, Janet L. Davies, Ellen Hastings Janosik, Mental health and psychiatric nursing: a caring approach
      Bill runs into the kitchen and tells Dad that Erik is throwing a tantrum. He tells Bill to go back and watch his program and to ignore his brother. Fifteen minutes later, Erik is still screaming []
    • 1996, New York Magazine, Vol. 29, No. 32, 19 Aug 1996; Entertaining Mrs Stone
      In 1975, pregnant with the second of her three children, she threw a hissy fit to get on a trip to Boston for elected officials.
  18. (transitive) To project or send forth.
  19. To put on hastily; to spread carelessly.
  20. To twist two or more filaments of (silk, etc.) so as to form one thread; to twist together, as singles, in a direction contrary to the twist of the singles themselves; sometimes applied to the whole class of operations by which silk is prepared for the weaver.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Tomlinson to this entry?)
  21. (baseball, slang, of a team, a manager, etc.) To select (a pitcher); to assign a pitcher to a given role (such as starter or reliever).
    • 2009, Michael T. Lynch, Jr., It Ain’t So: A Might-Have-Been History of the White Sox in 1919 and Beyond, page 63 →ISBN
      I have a minor quibble with Gleason’s decision to throw Lefty Williams in Game Eight with the Series in the balance.
  22. (transitive) To install (a bridge).
    • 1860, Fredrika Bremer (trans. Mary Howitt), Life in the Old World, v. 1, p. 164.
      [] across the rapid smaragdus-green waters, pouring onward into the country, are thrown three bridges …
  23. (obsolete, Scotland, Northern England) To twist or turn.
  24. (American football) Synonym of pass
  25. (transitive) (of a punch or boxing combination) to deliver
    • 1941, Newsweek, Volume 18, p.54, [2]
      ···not only did I not want to throw a punch at him, I wanted to give him a solid silver token of thanks···
Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:throw
Derived terms
Translations
References
  • The Dictionary of the Scots Language

Noun

throw (plural throws)

  1. The flight of a thrown object.
  2. The act of throwing something.
    • 2006, Hans-Wolfgang Loidl, Trends in Functional Programming (volume 5, page 62)
      If the expression is a throw, we unwind the stack seeking a handler expression.
  3. One’s ability to throw.
  4. A distance travelled; displacement.
    • 1947, James Jerome Gibson, Motion Picture Testing and Research (issue 7, page 49)
      The visibility of the screen image is affected by the length of throw of the projector, the type of projector, the intensity of the projector lamp, and the type of the screen.
  5. A piece of fabric used to cover a bed, sofa or other soft furnishing.
  6. A single instance, occurrence, venture, or chance.
Translations

Derived terms

  • a stone’s throw
  • bike throw
  • corner throw
  • throw pillow
  • throw-up

References

  • Krueger, Dennis (December 1982). “Why On Earth Do They Call It Throwing?” Studio Potter Vol. 11, Number 1.[3]

Etymology 2

From Middle English throwe, alteration of thrawe, from Old English þrāwu (labor pang, agony in childbirth or death), akin to Old English þrēa (affliction, pang), þrōwan (to suffer). More at throe.

Noun

throw (plural throws)

  1. Pain, especially pain associated with childbirth; throe.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spenser to this entry?)
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dryden to this entry?)
  2. (veterinary) The act of giving birth in animals, especially in cows.

Verb

throw (third-person singular simple present throws, present participle throwing, simple past threw, past participle thrown)

  1. (transitive, said of animals) To give birth to.
    • 1916, Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association: Volume 49
      At the end of the normal gestation period the cow threw two calf mummies as large as cats.

Etymology 3

From Middle English, from Old English þrāh, þrāg (space of time, period, while). Of uncertain origin. Perhaps related to Gothic ???????????????????????????? (þragjan, to run).

Noun

throw (plural throws)

  1. (obsolete) A moment, time, occasion.
  2. (obsolete) A period of time; a while.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.iv:
      Downe himselfe he layd / Vpon the grassie ground, to sleepe a throw; / The cold earth was his couch, the hard steele his pillow.
Synonyms
  • stound

Etymology 4

Noun

throw (plural throws)

  1. Obsolete form of throe.
    • 1806, The Evangelical Magazine (page 441)
      [] when we behold the fixed eye, the pale lips, the convulsive throws of death distorting the countenance; []

Anagrams

  • -worth, Worth, whort, worth, wroth

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial