flit vs flutter what difference

what is difference between flit and flutter

English

Etymology

From Middle English flitten, flytten, from Old Norse flytja (to move), from Proto-Germanic *flutjaną, from Proto-Indo-European *plewd- (to flow; run). Cognate Icelandic flytja, Swedish flytta, Danish flytte, Norwegian flytte, Faroese flyta. Compare also Saterland Frisian flitskje (to rush; run quickly).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /flɪt/
  • Rhymes: -ɪt

Noun

flit (plural flits)

  1. A fluttering or darting movement.
  2. (physics) A particular, unexpected, short lived change of state.
  3. (slang) A homosexual.

Derived terms

  • moonlight flit

Verb

flit (third-person singular simple present flits, present participle flitting, simple past and past participle flitted)

  1. To move about rapidly and nimbly.
    • 1855, Tennyson, Maud:
      A shadow flits before me, / Not thou, but like to thee; []
    • 1912: Edgar Rice Burroughs, Tarzan of the Apes, Chapter 6
      There were many apes with faces similar to his own, and further over in the book he found, under “M,” some little monkeys such as he saw daily flitting through the trees of his primeval forest. But nowhere was pictured any of his own people; in all the book was none that resembled Kerchak, or Tublat, or Kala.
  2. To move quickly from one location to another.
    • 1597, Richard Hooker, Of the Lawes of Ecclesiastical Politie, Chapter 5:
      By their means it became a received opinion, that the souls of men departing this life, do flit out of one body into some other.
  3. (physics) To unpredictably change state for short periods of time.
    My blender flits because the power cord is damaged.
  4. (Britain, dialect) To move house (sometimes a sudden move to avoid debts).
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wright to this entry?)
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Jamieson to this entry?)
    • 1855, Anthony Trollope, The Warden, page 199 →ISBN
      After this manner did the late Warden of Barchester Hospital accomplish his flitting, and change his residence.
    • 1859, George Dasent (tr.), Popular Tales from the Norse, “The Cat on the Dovrefell”:
      [] we can’t give any one house-room just now, for every Christmas Eve such a pack of Trolls come down upon us that we are forced to flit, and haven’t so much as a house over our own heads, to say nothing of lending one to any one else.
  5. To move a tethered animal to a new, grazing location.
  6. To be unstable; to be easily or often moved.
    • the free soul to flitting air resign’d

Related terms

  • dart
  • dash
  • flirt
  • lunge

Translations

Adjective

flit (comparative more flit, superlative most flit)

  1. (poetic, obsolete) Fast, nimble.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, II.iv:
      And in his hand two darts exceeding flit, / And deadly sharpe he held […].

Anagrams

  • ILTF, lift

Norwegian Nynorsk

Noun

flit m (definite singular fliten, uncountable)

  1. form removed with the spelling reform of 2012; superseded by flid m

Scots

Verb

flit (third-person singular present flits, present participle flittin, past flittit, past participle flittit)

  1. To move house.
  2. To flit.

Derived terms

  • munelicht flittin

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Swedish flit, from Middle Low German vlīt, vlît (cognate with German Low German Fliet, Saterland Frisian Fliet, Dutch vlijt, Danish flid, Norwegian Bokmål flid, Norwegian Nynorsk flit, and German Fleiß, Fleiss).

Pronunciation

Noun

flit c

  1. diligence, industriousness, energy
    där flitens lampa brinner

    where [someone] works long hours

Declension

Related terms

  • flitbetyg
  • flitig
  • flitpengar

References

  • flit in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)
  • flit in Svenska Akademiens ordbok (SAOB)

Anagrams

  • filt

Westrobothnian

Noun

flit m (definite flitn, dative flitåm)

  1. Fly-Tox (insecticide)


English

Etymology

From Middle English floteren, from Old English floterian, flotorian (to float about, flutter), from Proto-Germanic *flutrōną, frequentative of Proto-Germanic *flutōną (to float), equivalent to float +‎ -er (frequentative suffix). Cognate with Low German fluttern, fluddern (to flutter), German flittern, Dutch fladderen; also Albanian flutur (butterfly). More at float.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈflʌtɚ/, [ˈflʌɾɚ]
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈflʌtə/
  • Rhymes: -ʌtə(ɹ)

Verb

flutter (third-person singular simple present flutters, present participle fluttering, simple past and past participle fluttered)

  1. (intransitive) To flap or wave quickly but irregularly.
  2. (intransitive) Of a winged animal: to flap the wings without flying; to fly with a light flapping of the wings.
  3. (intransitive, aerodynamics) To undergo divergent oscillations (potentially to the point of causing structural failure) due to a positive feedback loop between elastic deformation and aerodynamic forces.
  4. (transitive) To cause something to flap.
  5. (transitive) To drive into disorder; to throw into confusion.
  6. (intransitive) To be in a state of agitation or uncertainty.
  7. (intransitive, obsolete) To be frivolous.
  8. (espionage, slang) To subject to a lie detector test.
    • 1978, Edward Jay Epstein, Legend: The Secret World of Lee Harvey Oswald (page 38)
      This was the first time that Nosenko had been subjected to a lie detector — or what the CIA called fluttering. The Soviet Union did not use such devices for interrogation.
    • 2002, Paul Eddy, Flint’s Law (page 90)
      “Anyway, she cracked and we fluttered her and—”
      Fluttered her?”
      “Sorry, gave her a polygraph, a lie detector test. And she passed, more or less, []

Translations

Noun

flutter (countable and uncountable, plural flutters)

  1. The act of fluttering; quick and irregular motion.
    • c. 1838, Richard Monckton Milnes, The Forest
      the chirp and flutter of some single bird
  2. A state of agitation.
    • flutter of spirits
    • 1900, Henry James, The Soft Side The Third Person Chapter 3
      Their visitor was an issue – at least to the imagination, and they arrived finally, under provocation, at intensities of flutter in which they felt themselves so compromised by his hoverings that they could only consider with relief the fact of nobody’s knowing.
  3. An abnormal rapid pulsation of the heart.
  4. (uncountable, aerodynamics) An extremely dangerous divergent oscillation caused by a positive feedback loop between the elastic deformation of an object and the aerodynamic forces acting on it, potentially resulting in structural failure.
  5. (Britain) A small bet or risky investment.
    • 30 July, 2009, Eurosport, Gray Matter: How will Schu do?
      So with his victory odds currently at 14/1 or 3/1 for the podium, he’s still most certainly well worth a flutter []
  6. A hasty game of cards or similar.
  7. (audio, electronics) The rapid variation of signal parameters, such as amplitude, phase, and frequency.
    Coordinate term: wow

Derived terms

  • aflutter
  • flutter in the dovecote
  • flutterby
  • fluttersome
  • fluttery

Translations


Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial