float vs swim what difference

what is difference between float and swim

English

Etymology

From Middle English floten, from Old English flotian (to float), from Proto-West Germanic *flotōn, from Proto-Germanic *flutōną (to float), from Proto-Indo-European *plewd-, *plew- (to float, swim, fly). Cognate with Saterland Frisian flotje (to float), West Frisian flotsje (to float), Dutch vlotten (to float), Middle Low German vloten, vlotten (to float, swim), German flötzen, flößen (to float), Old Norse flota (to float, launch), Icelandic fljóta, Old English flēotan (to float, swim), Ancient Greek πλέω (pléō), Lithuanian plaukti, Russian пла́вать (plávatʹ), Latin plaustrum (wagon, cart). Compare flow, fleet.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /fləʊt/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /floʊt/
  • Rhymes: -əʊt

Verb

float (third-person singular simple present floats, present participle floating, simple past and past participle floated)

  1. (intransitive) Of an object or substance, to be supported by a liquid of greater density than the object so as that part of the object or substance remains above the surface.
  2. (transitive) To cause something to be suspended in a liquid of greater density.
  3. (intransitive) To be capable of floating.
  4. (intransitive) To move in a particular direction with the liquid in which one is floating
  5. (intransitive) To drift or wander aimlessly.
  6. (intransitive) To drift gently through the air.
  7. (intransitive) To move in a fluid manner.
  8. (intransitive, figuratively) To circulate.
  9. (intransitive, colloquial) (of an idea or scheme) To be viable.
  10. (transitive) To propose (an idea) for consideration.
  11. (intransitive) To automatically adjust a parameter as related parameters change.
  12. (intransitive, finance) (of currencies) To have an exchange value determined by the markets as opposed to by rule.
  13. (transitive, finance) To allow (the exchange value of a currency) to be determined by the markets.
  14. (transitive, colloquial) To extend a short-term loan to.
  15. (transitive, finance) To issue or sell shares in a company (or units in a trust) to members of the public, followed by listing on a stock exchange.
    • 2005 June 21, Dewi Cooke, The Age [1],
      He [Mario Moretti Polegato] floated the company on the Milan Stock Exchange last December and sold 29 per cent of its shares, mostly to American investors.
    • 2007, Jonathan Reuvid, Floating Your Company: The Essential Guide to Going Public.
    • 2011, Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, SIPRI Yearbook 2011: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security, footnote i, page 269,
      As a result of this reverse acquisition, Hurlingham changed its name to Manroy plc and floated shares on the Alternative Investment Market in London.
  16. (transitive) To spread plaster over (a surface), using the tool called a float.
    • 1932, The Bricklayer, Mason and Plasterer (volumes 35-37, page 35)
      This wire, nailed over the face of the old plaster will also reinforce any loose lath or plaster after the walls have set. Float the wall to the face of the lath first.
  17. (transitive) To use a float (rasp-like tool) upon.
  18. (transitive) To transport by float (vehicular trailer).
  19. (poker) To perform a float.
  20. (computing, transitive) To cause (an element within a document) to float above or beside others.
    • 2010, Andy Harris, HTML, XHTML and CSS All-In-One For Dummies (page 290)
      To get the footer acting right, you need to float it and clear it on both margins.

Derived terms

  • float someone’s boat
  • whatever floats your boat

Translations

Noun

float (plural floats)

  1. A buoyant device used to support something in water or another liquid.
  2. A mass of timber or boards fastened together, and conveyed down a stream by the current; a raft.
  3. A float board.
  4. A tool similar to a rasp, used in various trades.
  5. A sort of trowel used for finishing concrete surfaces or smoothing plaster.
  6. An elaborately decorated trailer or vehicle, intended for display in a parade or pageant.
  7. (Britain) A small vehicle used for local deliveries, especially in the term milk float.
    • 1913, D.H. Lawrence, Sons and Lovers, chapter 7
      As soon as the skies brightened and plum-blossom was out, Paul drove off in the milkman’s heavy float up to Willey Farm.
  8. (finance) Funds committed to be paid but not yet paid.
  9. (finance, Australia, and other Commonwealth countries?) An offering of shares in a company (or units in a trust) to members of the public, normally followed by a listing on a stock exchange.
  10. (banking) The total amount of checks/cheques or other drafts written against a bank account but not yet cleared and charged against the account.
  11. (insurance) Premiums taken in but not yet paid out.
  12. (programming) A floating-point number, especially one that has lower precision than a double.
    • 2011, Rubin H. Landau, A First Course in Scientific Computing (page 214)
      If you want to be a scientist or an engineer, learn to say “no” to singles and floats.
  13. A soft beverage with a scoop of ice-cream floating in it.
  14. A small sum of money put in a cashier’s till at the start of business to enable change to be made.
  15. (poker) A maneuver where a player calls on the flop or turn with a weak hand, with the intention of bluffing after a subsequent community card.
  16. (knitting) One of the loose ends of yarn on an unfinished work.
  17. (automotive) a car carrier or car transporter truck or truck-and-trailer combination
  18. (transport) a lowboy trailer
  19. (tempering) A device sending a copious stream of water to the heated surface of a bulky object, such as an anvil or die.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  20. (obsolete) The act of flowing; flux; flow.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)
  21. A quantity of earth, eighteen feet square and one foot deep.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Mortimer to this entry?)
  22. A polishing block used in marble working; a runner.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  23. (Britain, dated) A coal cart.
  24. A breakdancing move in which the body is held parallel to the floor while balancing on one or both hands.
  25. (computing) A visual style on a web page that causes the styled elements to float above or beside others.
    • 2007, Michael Bowers, Pro CSS and HTML Design Patterns (page 93)
      When a float cannot fit next to another float, it moves down below it. A float’s position, size, padding, borders, and margins affect the position of adjacent floats and adjacent inline content.

Synonyms

  • (Shares offered to the public:): initial public offering

Derived terms

  • floatplane

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • aloft, flota

Faroese

Noun

float ? (plural [please provide])

  1. fleet, navy


English

Etymology 1

From Middle English swimmen, from Old English swimman (to swim, float) (class III strong verb; past tense swamm, past participle geswummen), from Proto-West Germanic *swimman, from Proto-Germanic *swimmaną (to swoon, lose consciousness, swim), from Proto-Indo-European *swem(bʰ)- (to be unsteady, move, swim).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, US) IPA(key): /swɪm/
  • Rhymes: -ɪm

Verb

swim (third-person singular simple present swims, present participle swimming, simple past swam or (archaic) swum, past participle swum)

  1. (intransitive) To move through the water, without touching the bottom; to propel oneself in water by natural means.
    • 1720, Daniel Defoe, Captain Singleton, London: J. Brotherton, p. 87,[1]
      We were now all upon a Level, as to our travelling; being unshipp’d, for our Bark would swim no farther, and she was too heavy to carry on our Backs []
  2. (intransitive) To become immersed in, or as if in, or flooded with, or as if with, a liquid
    swimming in self-pity
    a bare few bits of meat swimming in watery sauce
  3. (intransitive) To move around freely because of excess space.
    • 1777, The Poetical Preceptor; Or, a Collection of Select Pieces of Poetry, Etc
      A fam’d Sur-tout he wears, which once was blue, / And his foot swims in a capacious shoe.
  4. (transitive) To traverse (a specific body of water, or a specific distance) by swimming; or, to utilize a specific swimming stroke; or, to compete in a specific swimming event.
    For exercise, we like to swim laps around the pool.
    I want to swim the 200-yard breaststroke in the finals.
    • Sometimes he thought to swim the stormy main.
  5. (transitive, uncommon) To cause to swim.
    to swim a horse across a river
    Half of the guinea pigs were swum daily.
  6. (intransitive, archaic) To float.
    • c. 1599, William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar, Act V, Scene 1,[3]
      Why, now, blow wind, swell billow, and swim bark!
      The storm is up and all is on the hazard.
    • 1611, King James Version of the Bible, 2 Kings 6:6,[4]
      And he cut down a stick, and cast it in thither; and the iron did swim.
  7. (intransitive) To be overflowed or drenched.
    • I am weary with my groaning; all the night make I my bed to swim; I water my couch with my tears.
  8. (transitive) To immerse in water to make the lighter parts float.
    to swim wheat in order to select seed
  9. (transitive, historical) To test (a suspected witch) by throwing into a river; those who floated rather than sinking were deemed to be witches.
  10. (intransitive) To glide along with a waving motion.
Usage notes
  • In Late Middle English and Early Modern English, the present participle form swimmand still sometimes occurred in Midlands and Northern dialects, for exampleː
    • The water to nourish the fish swimmand. (The Towneley plays)
    • Their young child Troiane, as swift as dolphin fish, swimmand away. (1513, Gavin Douglas, Virgil’s Aeneid)
Derived terms
  • sink or swim
  • swim like a fish
  • swimmer
  • swimsuit
Translations

Noun

swim (plural swims)

  1. An act or instance of swimming.
    I’m going for a swim.
  2. The sound, or air bladder, of a fish.
  3. (Britain) A part of a stream much frequented by fish.
  4. A dance move of the 1960s in which the arms are moved in a freestyle swimming manner.
Derived terms
  • in the swim
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English swime, sweme, swaime (“a dizziness, swoon, trance”), from Old English swima (a swoon, swimming in the head).

Noun

swim (plural swims)

  1. A dizziness; swoon.

Verb

swim (third-person singular simple present swims, present participle swimming, simple past swam or (archaic) swum, past participle swum)

  1. (intransitive) To be dizzy or vertiginous; have a giddy sensation; to have, or appear to have, a whirling motion.
    My head was swimming after drinking two bottles of cheap wine.

Etymology 3

Abbreviation of someone who isn’t me.

Noun

swim (plural not attested)

  1. (Internet slang, text messaging) Abbreviation of someone who isn’t me. used as a way to avoid self-designation or self-incrimination, especially in online drug forums

See also

  • swim on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • friend of mine

References

  • swim at OneLook Dictionary Search

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