flocculent vs woolly what difference

what is difference between flocculent and woolly

English

Etymology

From Latin floccus (flock of wool).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈflɒkjʊlənt/

Adjective

flocculent (comparative more flocculent, superlative most flocculent)

  1. Flocculated, resembling bits of wool; woolly.
  2. Covered in a woolly substance; downy.
  3. Flaky.

Derived terms

  • flocculent spiral galaxy

Translations

Noun

flocculent (plural flocculents)

  1. (astronomy) diminutive of flocculent spiral galaxy

Antonyms

  • (galaxy): grand design

Hyponyms

  • (galaxy): multi-arm


English

Alternative forms

  • wooly (chiefly used in the US, but less common than woolly even there)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈwʊli/
  • Rhymes: -ʊli

Etymology 1

From Middle English wolly, equivalent to wool +‎ -y. Cognate with Saterland Frisian wullich (woolly), Dutch wollig (woolly), German wohlig (woolly), Swedish ullig (woolly).

Adjective

woolly (comparative woollier, superlative woolliest)

  1. Made of wool.
  2. Having a thick, soft texture, as if made of wool.
  3. (figuratively, of thinking, principles, etc.) Based on emotions rather than logic.
  4. (figuratively) Unclear, fuzzy, hazy, cloudy.
  5. (obsolete) Clothed in wool.
Derived terms
  • woolly hat
  • woolly-headed, wooly-headed
  • woolly-minded (British) and (US), wooly-minded (US)
Translations

Noun

woolly (plural woollies)

  1. (informal) A sweater or similar garment made of wool.
  2. (US, slang) A sheep not yet shorn.
  3. A piece of woolwork.

Etymology 2

From woolyback.

Noun

woolly (plural woollies)

  1. (Liverpudlian slang, derogatory) A woolly back; someone from the area around Liverpool, not from Liverpool itself.

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