flood vs overflow what difference

what is difference between flood and overflow

English

Alternative forms

  • floud (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English flod, from Old English flōd, from Proto-West Germanic *flōdu, from Proto-Germanic *flōduz, from *plew- (to flow). Cognate with Scots flude, fluid, Saterland Frisian Floud, Dutch vloed, German Flut, Danish flod, Icelandic flóð, and Gothic ???????????????????????? (flōdus).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: flŭd, IPA(key): /flʌd/
  • Rhymes: -ʌd

Noun

flood (plural floods)

  1. A (usually disastrous) overflow of water from a lake or other body of water due to excessive rainfall or other input of water.
  2. (figuratively) A large number or quantity of anything appearing more rapidly than can easily be dealt with.
  3. The flowing in of the tide, opposed to the ebb.
  4. A floodlight.
  5. Menstrual discharge; menses.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Harvey to this entry?)
  6. (obsolete) Water as opposed to land.
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost
      Who beheld from the safe shore their floating carcasses and broken chariot-wheels. So thick bestrown, abject and lost, lay these, covering the flood, under amazement of their hideous change.

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • deluge
  • diversion
  • inundation
  • torrent

Verb

flood (third-person singular simple present floods, present participle flooding, simple past and past participle flooded)

  1. To overflow, as by water from excessive rainfall.
  2. To cover or partly fill as if by a flood.
    The floor was flooded with beer.
    They flooded the room with sewage.
  3. (figuratively) To provide (someone or something) with a larger number or quantity of something than can easily be dealt with.
  4. (Internet, transitive, intransitive) To paste numerous lines of text to (a chat system) in order to disrupt the conversation.
    • 1998, “Dr. Cat”, Furry web site plug (on newsgroup alt.fan.furry)
      There’s also a spam filter in the code now, so if someone attempts to flood people’s screens with macros or a bot, everything after the first few lines is thrown away.
  5. To bleed profusely, as after childbirth.

Antonyms

  • (overflow): drain

Synonyms

  • (overflow): overfill
  • (cover): inundate
  • (provide with large number): inundate, swamp, deluge

Derived terms

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • of old

Middle English

Noun

flood

  1. Alternative form of flod

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from English flood.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈflɐd͡ʒ/

Noun

flood m (plural floods)

  1. (Internet slang) a flood of superfluous text messages

Related terms

  • floodar


English

Etymology

From Middle English overflowen, from Old English oferflōwan, equivalent to over- +‎ flow.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation)
    • (noun): enPR: ōʹvə-flō, IPA(key): /ˈəʊvəˌfləʊ/
    • (verb): enPR: ō-və-flōʹ, IPA(key): /ˌəʊvəˈfləʊ/
  • (General American)
    • (noun): enPR: ōʹvər-flō, IPA(key): /ˈoʊvɚˌfloʊ/
    • (verb): enPR: ō-vər-flōʹ, IPA(key): /ˌoʊvɚˈfloʊ/
  • Rhymes: -əʊ (verb)

Noun

overflow (countable and uncountable, plural overflows)

  1. The spillage resultant from overflow; excess.
  2. Outlet for escape of excess material.
  3. (computing) The situation where a value exceeds the available numeric range.

Derived terms

  • overflow hole

Translations

Verb

overflow (third-person singular simple present overflows, present participle overflowing, simple past overflowed, past participle overflowed or (US, proscribed) overflown)

  1. (transitive) To flow over the brim of (a container).
  2. (transitive) To cover with a liquid, literally or figuratively.
  3. (transitive) To cause an overflow. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  4. (intransitive) To flow over the edge of a container.
  5. (intransitive) To exceed limits or capacity.
    1. (computing, transitive, intransitive) To (cause to) exceed the available numeric range.
  6. (intransitive) To be superabundant; to abound.
    • 1857, Eustace Rogers Conder, Josiah Conder: A Memoir
      I see and feel that I want the first requisite — a heart overflowing with Divine love towards sinners

Translations

Derived terms

  • buffer overflow
  • full to overflowing
  • underflow

Portuguese

Etymology

From English overflow.

Noun

overflow m (plural overflows)

  1. (computing) overflow (situation where a value exceeds the available range)
    Synonym: transbordamento

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