floor vs level what difference

what is difference between floor and level

English

Etymology

From Middle English flor, flore, from Old English flōr (floor, pavement, ground, bottom), from Proto-Germanic *flōrō, *flōrô, *flōraz (flat surface, floor, plain), from Proto-Indo-European *pleh₂ros (floor), from Proto-Indo-European *pleh₂- (flat). Cognate with West Frisian flier (floor), Dutch vloer (floor), German Flur (field, floor, entrance hall), Swedish flor (floor of a cow stall), Irish urlár (floor), Scottish Gaelic làr (floor, ground, earth), Welsh llawr (floor, ground), Latin plānus (level, flat).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: flô, IPA(key): /flɔː/
  • (General American) enPR: flôr, IPA(key): /flɔɹ/
  • (rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) enPR: flōr, IPA(key): /flo(ː)ɹ/
  • (non-rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /floə/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)
  • Homophone: flaw (in non-rhotic accents with the horse–hoarse merger)
  • Homophones: flow, floe (non-rhotic with dough-door merger (AAVE, non-rhotic Southern accents))

Noun

floor (plural floors)

  1. The interior bottom or surface of a house or building; the supporting surface of a room.
    • A great bargain also had been the excellent Axminster carpet which covered the floor; as, again, the arm-chair in which Bunting now sat forward, staring into the dull, small fire.
  2. Ground (surface of the Earth, as opposed to the sky or water or underground).
  3. The lower inside surface of a hollow space.
  4. A structure formed of beams, girders, etc, with proper covering, which divides a building horizontally into storeys/stories.
  5. The supporting surface or platform of a structure such as a bridge.
  6. A storey/story of a building.
  7. In a parliament, the part of the house assigned to the members, as opposed to the viewing gallery.
  8. Hence, the right to speak at a given time during a debate or other public event.
  9. (nautical) That part of the bottom of a vessel on each side of the keelson which is most nearly horizontal.
  10. (mining) A horizontal, flat ore body; the rock underlying a stratified or nearly horizontal deposit.
  11. (mining) The bottom of a pit, pothole or mine.
  12. (mathematics) The largest integer less than or equal to a given number.
  13. (gymnastics) An event performed on a floor-like carpeted surface; floor exercise
  14. (gymnastics) A floor-like carpeted surface for performing gymnastic movements.
  15. (finance) A lower limit on the interest rate payable on an otherwise variable-rate loan, used by lenders to defend against falls in interest rates. Opposite of a cap.
  16. A dance floor.
    • 1983, “Maniac”, Michael Sembello and Dennis Matkosky:
      She’s a maniac, maniac on the floor / And she’s dancing like she never danced before
    • 1987, “Walk the Dinosaur”, Was (Not Was):
      Open the door, get on the floor / Everybody walk the dinosaur
  17. The trading floor of a stock exchange, pit; the area in which business is conducted at a convention or exhibition.

Synonyms

  • (bottom part of a room): see Thesaurus:floor
  • (right to speak): possession (UK)

Antonyms

  • ceiling

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Verb

floor (third-person singular simple present floors, present participle flooring, simple past and past participle floored)

  1. To cover or furnish with a floor.
  2. To strike down or lay level with the floor; to knock down.
  3. (driving, slang) To accelerate rapidly.
  4. To silence by a conclusive answer or retort.
  5. To amaze or greatly surprise.
  6. (colloquial) To finish or make an end of.
  7. (mathematics) To set a lower bound.

Translations

Further reading

  • Floor (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Floor in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

References

Anagrams

  • Floro

Middle English

Noun

floor

  1. Alternative form of flor


English

Etymology

From Middle English level, from Old French livel, liveau m, later nivel, niveau, from Latin libella f (a balance, a level), diminutive of libra f (a balance, a level); see libra, librate.

The verb is from Middle English levelen, from the noun.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ˈlɛv.əl/
  • Rhymes: -ɛvəl
  • Hyphenation: lev‧el

Adjective

level (comparative leveler or leveller, superlative levelest or levellest)

  1. The same height at all places; parallel to a flat ground.
  2. At the same height as some reference; constructed as level with.
  3. Unvaried in frequency.
  4. Unvaried in volume.
  5. Calm.
  6. In the same position or rank.
  7. Straightforward; direct; clear.
    • 1873, Matthew Arnold, Literature and Dogma
      a very plain and level account
  8. Well balanced; even; just; steady; impartial.
  9. (phonetics) Of even tone; without rising or falling inflection; monotonic.
    • 1891, Henry Sweet, A History of English Sounds from the Earliest Period
      Intonation or tone is either level, rising, or falling, marked respectively
  10. (physics) Perpendicular to a gravitational force.

Antonyms

  • tilted
  • unbalanced
  • uneven

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Noun

level (countable and uncountable, plural levels)

  1. A tool for finding whether a surface is level, or for creating a horizontal or vertical line of reference.
  2. A distance relative to a given reference elevation.
  3. Degree or amount.
  4. Achievement or qualification.
  5. (computer science) Distance from the root node of a tree structure.
  6. (video games) One of several discrete segments of a game, generally increasing in difficulty and representing different locations in the game world.
    Synonyms: stage, zone, world
  7. (role-playing games, video games) A numeric value that quantifies a character, ability, or item’s experience and power.
  8. A floor of a multi-storey building.
  9. (Britain) An area of almost perfectly flat land.
    • 1820, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Oedipus Tyrannus; Or, Swellfoot The Tyrant: A Tragedy in Two Acts:
      The troops grow mutinous—the revenue fails—
      There’s something rotten in us—for the level
      Of the State slopes, its very bases topple,
      The boldest turn their backs upon themselves!
  10. (Singapore, education) A school grade or year.

Hyponyms

Related terms

Descendants

  • German: Level
  • Irish: leibhéal
  • Japanese: レベル (reberu)
  • Welsh: lefel

Translations

See also

  • Wikipedia article on newsgroup posting style

Verb

level (third-person singular simple present levels, present participle (US) leveling or levelling, simple past and past participle (US) leveled or levelled)

  1. To adjust so as to make as flat or perpendicular to the ground as possible.
  2. To destroy by reducing to ground level; to raze.
    • He levels mountains and he raises plains.
  3. (role-playing games, video games) To progress to the next level.
  4. To aim or direct (a weapon, a stare, an accusation, etc).
    • 1592, John Stow, The Annales of England
      Bertram de Gordon, standing on the castle wall, levelled a quarrel out of a crossbow.
  5. To direct or impose (a penalty, fine, etc) at or upon (someone).
    • 1809, William Ross (Jr.), Abridgement of the laws of Scotland relating to hunting [etc], page 60:
      If the right of killing salmon belong exclusively to the King, and consequently to his donatories, why has not the Legislature secured the right by levelling penalties against such as should encroach upon it […] ?
    • 1978, Parliamentary Debates of the New Zealand House of Representatives, page 4955:
      How can the Minister reconcile the first statement with the clause, when he is in fact levelling punishment at the woman and not at the errant father […] ?
    • 1995, The Parliamentary Debates (Hansard) of the [Great British] House of Lords:
      There is no purpose in levelling fines because they would be merely paid from the £1.8 billion which the BBC collects.
    • 2007, Mary Jacoby, EU investigators endorse charges against Intel, Wall Street Journal Europe, 17 January, page 32, column 5:
      Ultimately, Ms. Kroes [European Union Antitrust Commissioner] could level a fine and order Intel to change its business practices.
  6. (sports) To make the score of a game equal.
  7. (figuratively) To bring to a common level or plane, in respect of rank, condition, character, privilege, etc.
  8. To adjust or adapt to a certain level.
    • For all his mind on honour fixed is, / To which he levels all his purposes.
  9. (usually with “with”) To speak honestly and openly with.

Derived terms

Translations

References

  • level on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Further reading

  • level in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • level in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Indonesian

Etymology

From English level, from Middle English level, from Old French livel, liveau m, later nivel, niveau, from Latin libella f (a balance, a level), diminutive of libra f (a balance, a level)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈlɛvəl]
  • Hyphenation: lè‧vêl

Noun

level (first-person possessive levelku, second-person possessive levelmu, third-person possessive levelnya)

  1. (colloquial) level.
    Synonyms: tingkatan, tataran, lapisan

Further reading

  • “level” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

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