floor vs shock what difference

what is difference between floor and shock

English

Etymology

From Middle English flor, flore, from Old English flōr (floor, pavement, ground, bottom), from Proto-Germanic *flōrō, *flōrô, *flōraz (flat surface, floor, plain), from Proto-Indo-European *pleh₂ros (floor), from Proto-Indo-European *pleh₂- (flat). Cognate with West Frisian flier (floor), Dutch vloer (floor), German Flur (field, floor, entrance hall), Swedish flor (floor of a cow stall), Irish urlár (floor), Scottish Gaelic làr (floor, ground, earth), Welsh llawr (floor, ground), Latin plānus (level, flat).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: flô, IPA(key): /flɔː/
  • (General American) enPR: flôr, IPA(key): /flɔɹ/
  • (rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) enPR: flōr, IPA(key): /flo(ː)ɹ/
  • (non-rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /floə/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)
  • Homophone: flaw (in non-rhotic accents with the horse–hoarse merger)
  • Homophones: flow, floe (non-rhotic with dough-door merger (AAVE, non-rhotic Southern accents))

Noun

floor (plural floors)

  1. The interior bottom or surface of a house or building; the supporting surface of a room.
    • A great bargain also had been the excellent Axminster carpet which covered the floor; as, again, the arm-chair in which Bunting now sat forward, staring into the dull, small fire.
  2. Ground (surface of the Earth, as opposed to the sky or water or underground).
  3. The lower inside surface of a hollow space.
  4. A structure formed of beams, girders, etc, with proper covering, which divides a building horizontally into storeys/stories.
  5. The supporting surface or platform of a structure such as a bridge.
  6. A storey/story of a building.
  7. In a parliament, the part of the house assigned to the members, as opposed to the viewing gallery.
  8. Hence, the right to speak at a given time during a debate or other public event.
  9. (nautical) That part of the bottom of a vessel on each side of the keelson which is most nearly horizontal.
  10. (mining) A horizontal, flat ore body; the rock underlying a stratified or nearly horizontal deposit.
  11. (mining) The bottom of a pit, pothole or mine.
  12. (mathematics) The largest integer less than or equal to a given number.
  13. (gymnastics) An event performed on a floor-like carpeted surface; floor exercise
  14. (gymnastics) A floor-like carpeted surface for performing gymnastic movements.
  15. (finance) A lower limit on the interest rate payable on an otherwise variable-rate loan, used by lenders to defend against falls in interest rates. Opposite of a cap.
  16. A dance floor.
    • 1983, “Maniac”, Michael Sembello and Dennis Matkosky:
      She’s a maniac, maniac on the floor / And she’s dancing like she never danced before
    • 1987, “Walk the Dinosaur”, Was (Not Was):
      Open the door, get on the floor / Everybody walk the dinosaur
  17. The trading floor of a stock exchange, pit; the area in which business is conducted at a convention or exhibition.

Synonyms

  • (bottom part of a room): see Thesaurus:floor
  • (right to speak): possession (UK)

Antonyms

  • ceiling

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Verb

floor (third-person singular simple present floors, present participle flooring, simple past and past participle floored)

  1. To cover or furnish with a floor.
  2. To strike down or lay level with the floor; to knock down.
  3. (driving, slang) To accelerate rapidly.
  4. To silence by a conclusive answer or retort.
  5. To amaze or greatly surprise.
  6. (colloquial) To finish or make an end of.
  7. (mathematics) To set a lower bound.

Translations

Further reading

  • Floor (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Floor in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

References

Anagrams

  • Floro

Middle English

Noun

floor

  1. Alternative form of flor


English

Alternative forms

  • choque (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ʃɒk/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ʃɑk/
  • Rhymes: -ɒk, -ɑk

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch schokken (to push, jolt, shake, jerk) or Middle French choquer (to collide with, clash), from Old Dutch *skokkan (to shake up and down, shog), from Proto-Germanic *skukkaną (to move, shake, tremble). Of uncertain origin. Perhaps related to Proto-Germanic *skakaną (to shake, stir), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kAg’-, *(s)keg- (to shake, stir); see shake. Cognate with Middle Low German schocken (collide with, deliver a blow to, move back and forth), Old High German scoc (a jolt, swing), Middle High German schocken (to swing) (German schaukeln), Old Norse skykkr (vibration, surging motion), Icelandic skykkjun (tremulously), Middle English schiggen (to shake). More at shog.

Noun

shock (countable and uncountable, plural shocks)

  1. A sudden, heavy impact.
    1. (figuratively) Something so surprising that it is stunning.
    2. A sudden or violent mental or emotional disturbance.
    3. (medicine) Electric shock, a sudden burst of electrical energy hitting a person or animal.
    4. (medicine) Circulatory shock, a medical emergency characterized by the inability of the circulatory system to supply enough oxygen to meet tissue requirements.
    5. (physics) A shock wave.
  2. (automotive, mechanical engineering) A shock absorber (typically in the suspension of a vehicle).
  3. (mathematics) A discontinuity arising in the solution of a partial differential equation.
Synonyms

See Thesaurus:surprise

Derived terms
Descendants
  • Japanese: ショック (shokku)
  • Korean: 쇼크 (syokeu)
Translations

Adjective

shock (not comparable)

  1. Causing intense surprise, horror, etc.; unexpected and shocking.

Verb

shock (third-person singular simple present shocks, present participle shocking, simple past and past participle shocked)

  1. (transitive) To cause to be emotionally shocked, to cause (someone) to feel surprised and upset.
  2. (transitive) To give an electric shock to.
  3. (transitive) To subject to a shock wave or violent impact.
  4. (obsolete, intransitive) To meet with a shock; to collide in a violent encounter.
    • 1832, Thomas De Quincey, Klosterheim Or, the Masque
      They saw the moment approach when the two parties would shock together.
Translations

References

  • John A. Simpson and Edward S. C. Weiner, editors (1989), “shock”, in The Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition, Oxford: Clarendon Press, →ISBN.

Etymology 2

Variant of shag.

Noun

shock (plural shocks)

  1. An arrangement of sheaves for drying; a stook.
    • 1557, Thomas Tusser, Five Hundred Points of Good Husbandry
      Cause it on shocks to be by and by set.
    • Behind the master walks, builds up the shocks.
  2. (commerce, dated) A lot consisting of sixty pieces; a term applied in some Baltic ports to loose goods.
  3. (by extension) A tuft or bunch of something, such as hair or grass.
    His head boasted a shock of sandy hair.
  4. (obsolete) A small dog with long shaggy hair, especially a poodle or spitz; a shaggy lapdog.
    • 1827 Thomas Carlyle, The Fair-Haired Eckbert
      When I read of witty persons, I could not figure them but like the little shock. (translating the German Spitz)

Verb

shock (third-person singular simple present shocks, present participle shocking, simple past and past participle shocked)

  1. (transitive) To collect, or make up, into a shock or shocks; to stook.

Anagrams

  • Kosch, hocks

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English shock.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): */ˈʃɔk/

Noun

shock m (invariable)

  1. shock (medical; violent or unexpected event)

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from English shock.

Noun

shock m (plural shocks)

  1. shock

Derived terms


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