floozie vs hooker what difference

what is difference between floozie and hooker

English

Alternative forms

  • floozy, floosy, floosie, floogy

Etymology

Corruption of flossy in the sense of showy.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ˈfluː.zi/
  • Rhymes: -uːzi

Noun

floozie (plural floozies)

  1. A vulgar or sexually promiscuous woman; a hussy or slattern.
    • 1975, Saul Bellow, Humboldt’s Gift [Avon ed., 1976, p. 418]:
      Now I was a forsaken codger snuffling disgracefully from a beautiful floozy’s abuse.
  2. A prostitute who attracts customers by walking the streets.

Synonyms

  • see Thesaurus:promiscuous woman

Translations



English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈhʊk.ə(ɹ)/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈhʊk.ɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ʊkə(ɹ)

Etymology 1

From hook (verb) +‎ -er.

Noun

hooker (plural hookers)

  1. One who, or that which, hooks.
  2. A small fishing boat.
  3. (nautical, slang, derogatory) Any antiquated craft.
    • 1896, Joseph Conrad, An Outcast of the Islands, Part III, Chapter Two,[1]
      [] the poor Flash is gone, and there is an end of it. Poor old hooker. Hey, Almayer? You made a voyage or two with me. Wasn’t she a sweet craft?
  4. (rugby) A player who hooks the ball out of the scrum with his foot.
  5. (cricket) A batsman or batswoman adept at or fond of playing hook shots.
  6. A crocheter.
  7. (informal, dated) Synonym of hook (attention-grabbing element of a creative work)
    • 1966, Charles Anthony Wainwright, The Television Copywriter (page 39)
      We regard the first seven seconds of a television commercial as the most critical or crucial in the whole unit — the “Do or Die Seven” — the “moment of decision” or the “hooker“, if you will, when we must capture the attention of the viewer, get him involved in the action, []
  8. (archaic, thieves’ cant) A thief who uses a pole with a hook on the end to steal goods.
Synonyms
  • (thief): angler, nuthook
Related terms
  • Hooker
Translations

Etymology 2

Unknown; The “prostitute” sense is the subject of a folk etymology connecting it to US Civil War general General Hooker, but the earliest known use dates to 1835. Less implausibly, it has also been connected to coastal features called hook (A spit or narrow cape of sand or gravel turned landward at the outer end, such as Sandy Hook in New Jersey, Red Hook in New York) in the ports of New York and Baltimore. Careful learned inference is not conclusive. See this essay, pp 105ff.

Noun

hooker (plural hookers)

  1. (US, slang) A prostitute. [from 1845]
  2. (slang, dated, 1920s to 1940s) An imprecise measure of alcoholic drink; a “slug” (of gin), or an overlarge gulp.
Synonyms
  • (prostitute): See also Thesaurus:prostitute
Translations

References

  • Language Hat
  • Albert Barrère and Charles G[odfrey] Leland, compilers and editors (1889–1890), “hooker”, in A Dictionary of Slang, Jargon & Cant [], volume I (A–K), Edinburgh: [] The Ballantyne Press, OCLC 882571771, page 39.
  • Farmer, John Stephen (1893) Slang and Its Analogues[5], volume 3, pages 334–335

Anagrams

  • rehook

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