flounce vs ruffle what difference

what is difference between flounce and ruffle

English

Etymology

Probably of North Germanic origin, from Norwegian flunsa (hurry), perhaps ultimately imitative. Or, perhaps formed on the pattern of pounce, bounce.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /flaʊns/
  • Rhymes: -aʊns

Verb

flounce (third-person singular simple present flounces, present participle flouncing, simple past and past participle flounced)

  1. To move in an exaggerated, bouncy manner.
  2. (archaic) To flounder; to make spastic motions.
    • a. 1677, Isaac Barrow, Of Contentment (sermon)
      To flutter and flounce will do nothing but batter and bruise us.
    • 1717, Joseph Addison, Metamorphoses
      With his broad fins and forky tail he laves / The rising surge, and flounces in the waves.
  3. To decorate with a flounce.
  4. To depart in a haughty, dramatic way that draws attention to oneself.

Translations

Noun

flounce (plural flounces)

  1. (sewing) A strip of decorative material, usually pleated, attached along one edge; a ruffle.W
    • Mind you, clothes were clothes in those days. […]  Frills, ruffles, flounces, lace, complicated seams and gores: not only did they sweep the ground and have to be held up in one hand elegantly as you walked along, but they had little capes or coats or feather boas.
  2. The act of flouncing.

Derived terms

  • flouncy

Translations

References

  • Oxford English Dictionary, 1884–1928, and First Supplement, 1933.


English

Etymology

From Middle English ruffelen, perhaps from Old Norse hrufla (to graze, scratch) or Middle Low German ruffelen (to wrinkle, curl). Further origin unknown. Related to Middle Dutch ruyffelen, German Low German ruffeln. See English ruff.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɹʌfəl/
  • Rhymes: -ʌfəl

Noun

ruffle (plural ruffles)

  1. Any gathered or curled strip of fabric added as trim or decoration.
  2. Disturbance; agitation; commotion.
  3. (military) A low, vibrating beat of a drum, quieter than a roll; a ruff.
  4. (zoology) The connected series of large egg capsules, or oothecae, of several species of American marine gastropods of the genus Fulgur.

Synonyms

  • (strip of fabric): frill, furbelow

Translations

Verb

ruffle (third-person singular simple present ruffles, present participle ruffling, simple past and past participle ruffled)

  1. (transitive) To make a ruffle in; to curl or flute, as an edge of fabric.
  2. (transitive) To disturb; especially, to cause to flutter.
    • 1832, Isaac Taylor, Saturday Evening
      the fantastic revelries [] that so often ruffled the placid bosom of the Nile
    • 1860, Sir William Hamilton, Sir William Hamilton, 9th Baronet
      These ruffle the tranquillity of the mind.
    • 1859, Alfred Tennyson, Guinevere
  3. (intransitive) To grow rough, boisterous, or turbulent.
  4. (intransitive) To become disordered; to play loosely; to flutter.
  5. (intransitive) To be rough; to jar; to be in contention; hence, to put on airs; to swagger.
  6. To make into a ruff; to draw or contract into puckers, plaits, or folds; to wrinkle.
  7. To erect in a ruff, as feathers.
    • 1832, Alfred Tennyson, The Palace of Art
  8. (military) To beat with the ruff or ruffle, as a drum.
  9. To throw together in a disorderly manner.

Translations

Derived terms

  • rufflement
  • ruffler
  • ruffle some feathers
  • ruffle up
  • ruffly
  • unruffled

References

Anagrams

  • Fulfer, luffer

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