flow vs flux what difference

what is difference between flow and flux

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: flō
    • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /fləʊ/
    • (General American) IPA(key): /floʊ/
  • Homophones: floe, Flo
  • Rhymes: -əʊ

Etymology 1

From Middle English flowen, from Old English flōwan (to flow), from Proto-West Germanic *flōan, from Proto-Germanic *flōaną (to flow), from Proto-Indo-European *plōw-, lengthened o-grade form of *plew- (to fly, flow, run). Compare float.

Noun

flow (countable and uncountable, plural flows)

  1. Movement in people or things characterized with a continuous motion, involving either a non solid mass or a multitude
    Water flows from an open tap.
    Rumors flow from one person to the next.
  2. The movement of a real or figurative fluid.
  3. (mathematics) A formalization of the idea of the motion of particles in a fluid, as a group action of the real numbers on a set.
    The notion of flow is basic to the study of ordinary differential equations.
  4. The rising movement of the tide.
  5. Smoothness or continuity.
  6. The amount of a fluid that moves or the rate of fluid movement.
  7. A flow pipe, carrying liquid away from a boiler or other central plant (compare with return pipe which returns fluid to central plant).
  8. (psychology) A mental state characterized by concentration, focus and enjoyment of a given task.
  9. The emission of blood during menstruation.
  10. (rap music slang) The ability to skilfully rap along to a beat.
  11. (computing) The sequence of steps taken in a piece of software to perform some action. (Usually preceded by an attributive such as login or search.)
Synonyms
  • (continuity): See also Thesaurus:continuity
Antonyms
  • (movement of the tide): ebb
  • (continuity): See also Thesaurus:discontinuity
Hyponyms
Derived terms
  • ebb and flow
  • flowchart
  • flowmeter
  • freeflow
  • single-flow
Translations
Further reading
  • flow on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Flow (psychology) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Verb

flow (third-person singular simple present flows, present participle flowing, simple past and past participle flowed)

  1. (intransitive) To move as a fluid from one position to another.
    Rivers flow from springs and lakes.
    Tears flow from the eyes.
  2. (intransitive) To proceed; to issue forth.
    Wealth flows from industry and economy.
  3. (intransitive) To move or match smoothly, gracefully, or continuously.
    The writing is grammatically correct, but it just doesn’t flow.
    • , Dedication
      Virgil [] is [] sweet and flowing in his hexameters.
  4. (intransitive) To have or be in abundance; to abound, so as to run or flow over.
    • In that day [] the hills shall flow with milk.
    • 1845, John Wilson, The Genius and Character of Robert Burns
      the exhilaration of a night that needed not the influence of the flowing bowl
  5. (intransitive) To hang loosely and wave.
    a flowing mantle; flowing locks
    • March 11, 1788, Alexander Hamilton, The Federalist Papers
      the imperial purple flowing in his train
  6. (intransitive) To rise, as the tide; opposed to ebb.
    The tide flows twice in twenty-four hours.
  7. (transitive, computing) To arrange (text in a wordprocessor, etc.) so that it wraps neatly into a designated space; to reflow.
  8. (transitive) To cover with water or other liquid; to overflow; to inundate; to flood.
  9. (transitive) To cover with varnish.
  10. (intransitive) To discharge excessive blood from the uterus.
Derived terms
  • flowable, reflowable
  • free-flowing
  • overflow
  • underflow
Translations

Etymology 2

Uncertain. Perhaps from Old Norse flói (a large bay, firth), see floe. Compare Scots flow (peat-bog, marsh), Icelandic flói (marshy ground).

Noun

flow (plural flows)

  1. (Scotland) A morass or marsh.

References

  • “flow, n.2.”, in OED Online ⁠, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, launched 2000.
  • “flow, v., n.1” in the Dictionary of the Scots Language, Edinburgh: Scottish Language Dictionaries.

Anagrams

  • Wolf, fowl, wolf

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈflow/, [ˈflow]

Noun

flow m (plural flows)

  1. flow


English

Etymology

From Old French flux, from Latin fluxus (flow).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /flʌks/
  • Rhymes: -ʌks

Noun

flux (countable and uncountable, plural fluxes)

  1. The act of flowing; a continuous moving on or passing by, as of a flowing stream.
    • 1730, John Arbuthnot, An Essay Concerning the Nature of Aliments
      By [] the perpetual Flux of the Liquids, a great part of the Liquids is thrown out of the Body.
    • 1991, Mann, H., Fyfe, W., Tazaki, K., & Kerrich, R., Biological Accumulation of Different Chemical Elements by Microorganisms from Yellowstone National Park, USA. Mechanisms And Phylogeny Of Mineralization In Biological Systems, 357-362.
      Investigation of the silica budget for the Upper and Lower Geyser Basins of Yellowstone National Park by Truesdell et al. suggest that the present fluxes of hotspring water and thermal energy may have been continuous for at least the past 10,000 yr.
  2. A state of ongoing change.
    The schedule is in flux at the moment.
    Languages, like our bodies, are in a continual flux.
    • 1856, Richard Chenevix Trench, On the Death of an Infant
      Her image has escaped the flux of things, / And that same infant beauty that she wore / Is fixed upon her now forevermore.
  3. A chemical agent for cleaning metal prior to soldering or welding.
    It is important to use flux when soldering or oxides on the metal will prevent a good bond.
  4. (physics) The rate of transfer of energy (or another physical quantity) through a given surface, specifically electric flux, magnetic flux.
    That high a neutron flux would be lethal in seconds.
  5. (archaic) A disease which causes diarrhea, especially dysentery.
  6. (archaic) Diarrhea or other fluid discharge from the body.
  7. The state of being liquid through heat; fusion.

Antonyms

  • (state of ongoing change): stasis

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

flux (third-person singular simple present fluxes, present participle fluxing, simple past and past participle fluxed)

  1. (transitive) To use flux on.
    You have to flux the joint before soldering.
  2. (transitive) To melt.
  3. (intransitive) To flow as a liquid.

Related terms

  • fluxion

Adjective

flux (not comparable)

  1. (uncommon) Flowing; unstable; inconstant; variable.
    • a. 1677, Isaac Barrow, “On Contentment”, Sermon XL, in The Theological Works, Volume 2, Clarendon Press, 1818, page 375:
      The flux nature of all things here.

Related terms

  • fluxional

Related terms

  • fluctuant

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin fluxus. Doublet of fluix.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈfluks/

Noun

flux m (plural fluxos)

  1. flow

Related terms

  • fluir

Further reading

  • “flux” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin fluxus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fly/

Noun

flux m (plural flux)

  1. flow
  2. flood, flood tide
    Antonym: reflux
  3. (figuratively) flood (an abundance of something)

Derived terms

Further reading

  • “flux” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Old French

Noun

flux m (oblique plural flux, nominative singular flux, nominative plural flux)

  1. diarrhea (rapid passage of fecal matter through the bowels)

Romanian

Etymology

Borrowed from French flux.

Noun

flux n (plural fluxuri)

  1. flow (the flow of the tide)

Declension


Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from French flux. Doublet of flujo and flojo.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfluks/, [ˈfluks]

Noun

flux m (plural fluxes)

  1. (card playing) flush (hand consisting of all cards with the same suit)
  2. (Venezuela, colloquial, Dominican Republic, dated) suit (set of clothes)
    Synonyms: terno, traje

Further reading

  • “flux” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

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