flow vs stream what difference

what is difference between flow and stream

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: flō
    • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /fləʊ/
    • (General American) IPA(key): /floʊ/
  • Homophones: floe, Flo
  • Rhymes: -əʊ

Etymology 1

From Middle English flowen, from Old English flōwan (to flow), from Proto-West Germanic *flōan, from Proto-Germanic *flōaną (to flow), from Proto-Indo-European *plōw-, lengthened o-grade form of *plew- (to fly, flow, run). Compare float.

Noun

flow (countable and uncountable, plural flows)

  1. Movement in people or things characterized with a continuous motion, involving either a non solid mass or a multitude
    Water flows from an open tap.
    Rumors flow from one person to the next.
  2. The movement of a real or figurative fluid.
  3. (mathematics) A formalization of the idea of the motion of particles in a fluid, as a group action of the real numbers on a set.
    The notion of flow is basic to the study of ordinary differential equations.
  4. The rising movement of the tide.
  5. Smoothness or continuity.
  6. The amount of a fluid that moves or the rate of fluid movement.
  7. A flow pipe, carrying liquid away from a boiler or other central plant (compare with return pipe which returns fluid to central plant).
  8. (psychology) A mental state characterized by concentration, focus and enjoyment of a given task.
  9. The emission of blood during menstruation.
  10. (rap music slang) The ability to skilfully rap along to a beat.
  11. (computing) The sequence of steps taken in a piece of software to perform some action. (Usually preceded by an attributive such as login or search.)
Synonyms
  • (continuity): See also Thesaurus:continuity
Antonyms
  • (movement of the tide): ebb
  • (continuity): See also Thesaurus:discontinuity
Hyponyms
Derived terms
  • ebb and flow
  • flowchart
  • flowmeter
  • freeflow
  • single-flow
Translations
Further reading
  • flow on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Flow (psychology) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Verb

flow (third-person singular simple present flows, present participle flowing, simple past and past participle flowed)

  1. (intransitive) To move as a fluid from one position to another.
    Rivers flow from springs and lakes.
    Tears flow from the eyes.
  2. (intransitive) To proceed; to issue forth.
    Wealth flows from industry and economy.
  3. (intransitive) To move or match smoothly, gracefully, or continuously.
    The writing is grammatically correct, but it just doesn’t flow.
    • , Dedication
      Virgil [] is [] sweet and flowing in his hexameters.
  4. (intransitive) To have or be in abundance; to abound, so as to run or flow over.
    • In that day [] the hills shall flow with milk.
    • 1845, John Wilson, The Genius and Character of Robert Burns
      the exhilaration of a night that needed not the influence of the flowing bowl
  5. (intransitive) To hang loosely and wave.
    a flowing mantle; flowing locks
    • March 11, 1788, Alexander Hamilton, The Federalist Papers
      the imperial purple flowing in his train
  6. (intransitive) To rise, as the tide; opposed to ebb.
    The tide flows twice in twenty-four hours.
  7. (transitive, computing) To arrange (text in a wordprocessor, etc.) so that it wraps neatly into a designated space; to reflow.
  8. (transitive) To cover with water or other liquid; to overflow; to inundate; to flood.
  9. (transitive) To cover with varnish.
  10. (intransitive) To discharge excessive blood from the uterus.
Derived terms
  • flowable, reflowable
  • free-flowing
  • overflow
  • underflow
Translations

Etymology 2

Uncertain. Perhaps from Old Norse flói (a large bay, firth), see floe. Compare Scots flow (peat-bog, marsh), Icelandic flói (marshy ground).

Noun

flow (plural flows)

  1. (Scotland) A morass or marsh.

References

  • “flow, n.2.”, in OED Online ⁠, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, launched 2000.
  • “flow, v., n.1” in the Dictionary of the Scots Language, Edinburgh: Scottish Language Dictionaries.

Anagrams

  • Wolf, fowl, wolf

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈflow/, [ˈflow]

Noun

flow m (plural flows)

  1. flow


English

Etymology

From Middle English streem, strem, from Old English strēam, from Proto-Germanic *straumaz (stream), from Proto-Indo-European *srowmos (river), from Proto-Indo-European *srew- (to flow). Doublet of rheum.

Cognate with Scots strem, streme, streym (stream, river), North Frisian strum (stream), West Frisian stream (stream), Low German Stroom (stream), Dutch stroom (current, flow, stream), German Strom (current, stream), Danish and Norwegian Bokmål strøm (current, stream, flow), Norwegian Nynorsk straum (current, stream, flow), Swedish ström (current, stream, flow), Icelandic straumur (current, stream, torrent, flood), Ancient Greek ῥεῦμα (rheûma, stream, flow), Lithuanian srovė (current, stream) Polish strumień (stream), Welsh ffrwd (stream, current), Scottish Gaelic sruth (stream).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: strēm, IPA(key): /stɹiːm/
  • Rhymes: -iːm

Noun

stream (plural streams)

  1. A small river; a large creek; a body of moving water confined by banks.
  2. A thin connected passing of a liquid through a lighter gas (e.g. air).
  3. Any steady flow or succession of material, such as water, air, radio signal or words.
  4. (sciences, umbrella term) All moving waters.
  5. (computing) A source or repository of data that can be read or written only sequentially.
  6. (figuratively) A particular path, channel, division, or way of proceeding.
    Haredi Judaism is a stream of Orthodox Judaism characterized by rejection of modern secular culture.
  7. (Britain, education) A division of a school year by perceived ability.
  8. A live stream.

Synonyms

  • (small river): beck, brook, burn

Hyponyms

  • (small river): rill
  • (moving water): river

Derived terms

  • airstream
  • downstream
  • Gulf Stream
  • jet stream
  • live stream
  • misfit stream
  • overfit stream
  • streamer
  • streamlet
  • streamling
  • underfit stream
  • upstream

Translations

Verb

stream (third-person singular simple present streams, present participle streaming, simple past and past participle streamed)

  1. (intransitive) To flow in a continuous or steady manner, like a liquid.
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, Moonfleet Chapter 4
      When I came to myself I was lying, not in the outer blackness of the Mohune vault, not on a floor of sand; but in a bed of sweet clean linen, and in a little whitewashed room, through the window of which the spring sunlight streamed.
  2. (intransitive) To extend; to stretch out with a wavy motion; to float in the wind.
    A flag streams in the wind.
  3. (transitive) To discharge in a stream.
    The soldier’s wound was streaming blood.
  4. (Internet) To push continuous data (e.g. music) from a server to a client computer while it is being used (played) on the client.

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • ‘maters, Amster, METARs, Master, armest, armets, master, mastre, maters, matres, metras, ramets, ramset, remast, tamers, tremas, trémas

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English stream.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /striːm/
  • Hyphenation: stream

Noun

stream m (plural streams)

  1. (computing, Internet) A stream.

Related terms

  • livestream
  • streamen

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *straum.

Germanic cognates include Old Frisian strām, Old Saxon strōm, Old High German stroum, Old Norse straumr. Extra-Germanic cognates include Ancient Greek ῥεῦμα (rheûma), Polish strumień, Albanian rrymë (flow, current).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stræ͜ɑːm/

Noun

strēam m

  1. stream
  2. current

Declension

Descendants

  • Middle English: strem, streem
    • English: stream
    • Scots: streme, streim

See also

  • ēa (river)
  • gārseċġ (ocean)
  • mere (lake)
  • (sea)

Spanish

Etymology

From English.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /esˈtɾim/, [esˈt̪ɾĩm]
  • IPA(key): /ˈestɾin/, [ˈes.t̪ɾĩn]

Noun

stream m (plural streams)

  1. (computing) stream

West Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian strām, from Proto-West Germanic *straum.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /strɪə̯m/

Noun

stream c (plural streamen, diminutive streamke)

  1. river
  2. stream (of fluids), flow
  3. electric current

Derived terms

  • streame

Further reading

  • “stream”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

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