flower vs flush what difference

what is difference between flower and flush

English

Alternative forms

  • flowre (obsolete)

Etymology 1

From Middle English flour, from Anglo-Norman flur, from Latin flōrem, accusative of flōs, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰleh₃- (to thrive, bloom). Doublet of flour.

Partially displaced Middle English blosme, blossem (flower; blossom) (see blossom).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈflaʊ.ə/, /ˈflaʊə/
  • (General American, Canada) IPA(key): /ˈflaʊ.ɚ/, /ˈflaʊɚ/
  • Rhymes: -aʊ.ə(ɹ), -aʊə(ɹ)
  • Homophone: flour (for people who pronounce flower as one syllable, or flour as two)

Noun

flower (plural flowers)

  1. A colorful, conspicuous structure associated with angiosperms, frequently scented and attracting various insects, and which may or may not be used for sexual reproduction.
  2. (botany) A reproductive structure in angiosperms (flowering plants), often conspicuously colourful and typically including sepals, petals, and either or both stamens and/or a pistil.
    • 1894, H. G. Wells, The Flowering of the Strange Orchid
      You know, Darwin studied their fertilisation, and showed that the whole structure of an ordinary orchid flower was contrived in order that moths might carry the pollen from plant to plant.
  3. A plant that bears flowers, especially a plant that is small and lacks wood.
  4. (usually with in) Of plants, a state of bearing blooms.
  5. (euphemistic, hypocoristic) The vulva, especially the labia majora.
  6. The best examples or representatives of a group.
    • 1594, Richard Hooker, Of the Lawes of Ecclesiastical Politie
      The choice and flower of all things profitable the Psalms do more briefly contain.
    • 1808, Robert Southey, Chronicle of the Cid, from the Spanish
      the flower of the chivalry of all Spain
    • 1915, Katharine Tynan, The Golden Boy
      In times of peace, so clean and bright, / And with a new-washed morning face, / He walked Pall Mall, a goodly sight, / The finished flower of all the race.
  7. The best state of things; the prime.
    • ?, Alfred Tennyson, Lady Clara Vere de Vere
      A simple maiden in her flower / Is worth a hundred coats of arms.
  8. (obsolete) Flour.
    • 1730, John Arbuthnot, An Essay Concerning the Nature of Aliments
      The Flowers of Grains, mixed with Water, will make a sort of Glue.
  9. (in the plural, chemistry, obsolete) A substance in the form of a powder, especially when condensed from sublimation.
  10. A figure of speech; an ornament of style.
  11. (printing) Ornamental type used chiefly for borders around pages, cards, etc.
    • 1841, William Savage, A Dictionary of the Art of Printing
      I pointed out to the late Mr. Catherwood , of the firm of Caslon and Catherwood , the inconvenience of both these modes of cutting flowers
  12. (in the plural) Menstrual discharges.
Usage notes

In its most common sense as “a colorful conspicuous structure”, the word flower includes many structures which are not anatomically flowers in the botanical sense. Sunflowers and daisies, for example, are structurally clusters of many small flowers that together appear to be a single flower (a capitulum, a form of pseudanthium), but these are considered to be flowers in the general sense. Likewise, the botanical definition of flower includes many structures that would not be considered a flower by the average person, such as the catkins of a willow tree or the downy flowers found atop a cattail stalk.

Synonyms
  • (inflorescence that resembles a flower): head, pseudanthium
  • (best examples): cream
  • (best state of things): prime
Translations

Verb

flower (third-person singular simple present flowers, present participle flowering, simple past and past participle flowered)

  1. (intransitive) To put forth blooms.
    This plant flowers in June.
  2. (transitive) To decorate with pictures of flowers.
  3. (intransitive) To reach a state of full development or achievement.
    • when flowr’d my youthful spring
    • 1940 Mahadev Desai, translator, Mahatma Gandhi, An Autobiography, Part III (IX) Simple Life, original published 1927-1929
      It only needed watering to take root, to flower and to fructify, and the watering came in due course.
  4. (archaic, intransitive) To froth; to ferment gently, as new beer.
  5. (intransitive) To come off as flowers by sublimation.
Synonyms
  • (to put forth blooms): bloom, blossom
  • (reach a state of achievement): flourish
Translations

Derived terms

Related terms

See also

  • Appendix:Flowers
  • Category:Flowers

Etymology 2

flow +‎ -er

Alternative forms

  • flow-er

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈfləʊə/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈfloʊɚ/

Noun

flower (plural flowers)

  1. (rare) Something that flows, such as a river.
    • 1886–1890, J. D. Rees, Narratives of Tours in India, page 340:
      Leaving the weavers’ village behind you, and crossing the sandy bed of the Vengavati or ‘Swift-flower,’ which, however, contained not a drop of water, you reach the ancient Jain temple.
    • 1888, John T. White, The Seventh Book of Cæsar’s Gallic War with a Vocabulary, page 224:
      Rhŏdănus, i, m. The Rhodanus (now Rhone); a river of Gaul [prob. a northern word, meaning “Swift-flower or Swift-passer”].
    • 1893, Arthur A. MacDonnell, A Sanskrit-English Dictionary, page 340:
      sará-yu, f. [swift flower: √sri] N. of a river (in Oudh), in C. gnly. û.
    • 1959, Scottish Studies, volumes 3–4, page 92:
      one that flows with force and speed; the fast flower
    • 2019, Radio Times Crossword, 24 August:
      Bonnie partner with Scottish flower (5) [as a clue for CLYDE]

Usage notes

  • The term is used with this meaning almost exclusively in cryptic crossword clues where it means river.

Anagrams

  • Fowler, Wolfer, flowre, fowler, reflow, wolfer

Cebuano

Noun

flower

  1. someone who is allowed to participate in games but cannot become it; usually a younger sibling of a player who may or may not fully grasp the mechanics of the game
  2. (mahjong) a flower or season tile
  3. (mahjong) the act of declaring and revealing a flower or season tile and in order drawing a replacement tile

Middle English

Noun

flower

  1. Alternative form of flour


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈflʌʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ʌʃ

Etymology 1

From Middle English flusshen, fluschen, of uncertain origin. Perhaps related to Middle English flasshen, flasschen, flaschen, see flash; or a Middle English blend of flowen (to flow) +‎ guschen (to gush). Compare with German flutschen.

Noun

flush (plural flushes)

  1. A group of birds that have suddenly started up from undergrowth, trees etc.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, V.2:
      As when a Faulcon hath with nimble flight / Flowne at a flush of Ducks foreby the brooke […].

Verb

flush (third-person singular simple present flushes, present participle flushing, simple past and past participle flushed)

  1. (transitive) To cause to take flight from concealment.
  2. (intransitive) To take suddenly to flight, especially from cover.
    • 1613, William Browne, Britannia’s Pastorals
      flushing from one spray unto another
    • 1972, United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Appropriations. Subcommittee on Department of Defense, Department of Defense Appropriations for Fiscal Year 1973 (page 460)
      AWACS is survivable due to its ability to flush on warning, to maneuver at jet speeds, to maintain awareness of the developing air situation and to command weapons as appropriate, including weapons for its own defense.
Translations

Etymology 2

Same as Etymology 3, according to the American Heritage Dictionary.

Adjective

flush (comparative flusher, superlative flushest)

  1. Smooth, even, aligned; not sticking out.
  2. Wealthy or well off.
  3. (typography) Short for flush left and right; a body of text aligned with both its left and right margins.
  4. Full of vigour; fresh; glowing; bright.
  5. Affluent; abounding; well furnished or suppled; hence, liberal; prodigal.
    • 1712, John Arbuthnot, The History of John Bull
      Lord Strut was not very flush in ready.
Synonyms
  • (typography): double-clean, flush left and right, forced, forced justified, force justified, justified
Derived terms
  • flush left, flush right, flush left and right
Translations

Etymology 3

Probably from Etymology 1 according to the American Heritage Dictionary.

Noun

flush (plural flushes)

  1. A sudden flowing; a rush which fills or overflows, as of water for cleansing purposes.
    • in manner of a wave or flush
  2. Particularly, such a cleansing of a toilet.
  3. A suffusion of the face with blood, as from fear, shame, modesty, or intensity of feeling of any kind; a blush; a glow.
    • 1830, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Madeline
      the flush of anger’d shame
  4. Any tinge of red colour like that produced on the cheeks by a sudden rush of blood.
  5. A sudden flood or rush of feeling; a thrill of excitement, animation, etc.
Translations

Verb

flush (third-person singular simple present flushes, present participle flushing, simple past and past participle flushed)

  1. (transitive) To cleanse by flooding with generous quantities of a fluid.
  2. (transitive) Particularly, to cleanse a toilet by introducing a large amount of water.
  3. (intransitive) To become suffused with reddish color due to embarrassment, excitement, overheating, or other systemic disturbance, to blush.
    • 1872, The Argosy. Edited by Mrs. Henry Wood. Volume XIV. July to December, 1872, London, p. 60 (Google)
      She turned, laughing at the surprise, and flushing with pleasure.
  4. (transitive) To cause to blush.
    • Nor flush with shame the passing virgin’s cheek.
    • 1925, Fruit of the Flower, by Countee Cullen
      “Who plants a seed begets a bud, — Extract of that same root; — Why marvel at the hectic blood — That flushes this wild fruit?”
  5. To cause to be full; to flood; to overflow; to overwhelm with water.
  6. (transitive) To excite, inflame.
    • , “Against Long Extemporary Prayers”
      such things as can only feed his pride and flush his ambition
  7. (intransitive, of a toilet) To be cleansed by being flooded with generous quantities of water.
  8. (transitive, computing) To clear (a buffer) of its contents.
  9. To flow and spread suddenly; to rush.
    • 1545, John Bale, The Image of Both Churches
      the flushing noise of many waters
  10. To show red; to shine suddenly; to glow.
  11. (masonry) To fill in (joints); to point the level; to make them flush.
  12. (mining, intransitive) To operate a placer mine, where the continuous supply of water is insufficient, by holding back the water, and releasing it periodically in a flood.
  13. (mining) To fill underground spaces, especially in coal mines, with material carried by water, which, after drainage, constitutes a compact mass.
  14. (intransitive, transitive) To dispose or be disposed of by flushing down a toilet
Usage notes

In sense “turn red with embarrassment”, blush is more common. More finely, in indicating the actual change, blush is usual – “He blushed with embarrassment” – but in indicating state, flushed is also common – “He was flushed with excitement”.

Synonyms
  • (turn red with embarrassment): blush
Translations

Etymology 4

Probably from Middle French flus (flow), cognate with flux.

Noun

flush (plural flushes)

  1. (poker) A hand consisting of all cards with the same suit.
Derived terms
Descendants
  • French: flush
  • Korean: 플러쉬 (peulleoswi)
  • Portuguese: flush
Translations

See also


French

Etymology

From English flush.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /flœʃ/

Noun

flush m (plural flushs)

  1. (poker) flush
  2. (anglicism) flush (reddening of the face)
  3. (anglicism, IT) emptying of the cache

Synonyms

  • (poker): couleur

Derived terms

  • quinte flush

Derived terms

  • flusher

Portuguese

Etymology

From English flush.

Noun

flush m (plural flushes)

  1. (poker) flush (hand consisting of all cards with the same suit)

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