flue vs fluke what difference

what is difference between flue and fluke

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fluː/
  • (obsolete) IPA(key): /fljuː/
  • Rhymes: -uː
  • Homophones: flew, flu

Etymology 1

From Middle English flue, flewe (mouthpiece of a hunting horn), of uncertain origin. Perhaps a back-formation from Middle English *flews (mistaken as a plural), from Old English flēwsa (a flow, flowing, flux). Alternatively, perhaps an alteration of Middle English floute, fleute, flote (a pipe), see English flute. Compare also Middle Dutch vloegh (groove, channel, flute of a fluted column).

Noun

flue (plural flues)

  1. A pipe or duct that carries gaseous combustion products away from the point of combustion (such as a furnace).
  2. An enclosed passageway in which to direct air or other gaseous current along.
  3. (obsolete, countable and uncountable) A woolly or downy substance; down, nap; a piece of this.
  4. In an organ flue pipe, the opening between the lower lip and the languet.
Related terms
  • flue gas
  • flue pipe
  • open flue
  • balanced flue
Translations

Etymology 2

Adjective

flue (comparative more flue, superlative most flue)

  1. (Britain, dialect) Alternative form of flew (shallow, flat)

References

Anagrams

  • fuel, fule

Danish

Etymology

From Old Danish flughæ, from Old Norse fluga.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fluːə/, [ˈfluːə], [ˈfluːu]

Noun

flue c (singular definite fluen, plural indefinite fluer)

  1. fly

Inflection


Esperanto

Pronunciation

Adverb

flue

  1. fluently

Latin

Verb

flue

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of fluō

Middle English

Verb

flue

  1. Alternative form of flowen

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse fluga f, from Proto-Germanic *flugǭ.

Noun

flue f or m (definite singular flua or fluen, indefinite plural fluer, definite plural fluene)

  1. (insect) a fly

Derived terms

  • fluefiske

See also

  • fluge (Nynorsk)

References

  • “flue” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /²flʉː.ə/ (example of pronunciation)

Verb

flue (present tense fluar, past tense flua, past participle flua, passive infinitive fluast, present participle fluande, imperative flu)

  1. Alternative form of flu

Anagrams

  • fule


English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) enPR: flo͞ok IPA(key): /fluːk/
  • (US) enPR: flo͞ok IPA(key): /fluk/
  • (obsolete) enPR: flyo͞ok IPA(key): /fljuːk/
  • Rhymes: -uːk

Etymology 1

Of uncertain or obscure origin, perhaps dialectal. It seems to have originally referred to a lucky shot at billiards. Possibly connected to sense 3, referring to whales’ use of flukes to move rapidly.

Noun

fluke (plural flukes)

  1. A lucky or improbable occurrence, with the implication that the occurrence could not be repeated.

Synonyms

  • glitch
Translations

Verb

fluke (third-person singular simple present flukes, present participle fluking, simple past and past participle fluked)

  1. To obtain a successful outcome by pure chance.
  2. (snooker) To fortuitously pot a ball in an unintended way.

Related terms

Etymology 2

From Old English flōc (flatfish), of Germanic origin, related to German flach (flat), Old Norse floke (flatfish), all ultimately from Proto-Germanic *flakaz.

Noun

fluke (plural flukes)

  1. A flounder.
  2. A trematode; a parasitic flatworm of the Trematoda class, related to the tapeworm.
Derived terms
flounder
  • Gulf fluke (Paralichthys albiguttus)
  • long fluke (Hippoglossoides limandoides)
  • pole fluke (Glyptocephalus cynoglossus)
  • sail fluke (Lepidorhombus whiffiagonis)
  • sand fluke (Microstomus microcephalus, Hippoglossoides platessoides)
trematode
  • American fluke (Fascioloides magna)
  • bile fluke
  • blood fluke
  • bladder fluke
  • cat liver fluke
  • cecal fluke (Postharmostomum gallinum)
  • Chinese liver fluke (Clonorchis sinensis, syn. Opisthorchis sinensis)
  • deer fluke (Fascioloides magna)
  • eye fluke
  • flukeworm
  • giant intestinal fluke (Fasciolopsis buski)
  • giant liver fluke (Fascioloides magna)
  • lancet fluke, lancet liver fluke (Dicrocoelium dendriticum)
  • liver fluke
  • lung fluke (Paragonimus spp.)

Etymology 3

Possibly as Etymology 2 or from Middle Low German flügel (wing), from Old High German vlügel, from Proto-Germanic *flugilaz (wing).

Noun

fluke (plural flukes)

  1. Either of the two lobes of a whale’s or similar creature’s tail.
  2. (nautical) Any of the triangular blades at the end of an anchor, designed to catch the ground.
  3. A metal hook on the head of certain staff weapons (such as a bill), made in various forms depending on function, whether used for grappling or to penetrate armour when swung at an opponent.
  4. In general, a winglike formation on a central piece.
  5. Waste cotton.
Derived terms
  • turn flukes
Translations

Further reading

  • fluke on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • summer flounder on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • trematoda on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • James Orchard Halliwell (1846), “FLUKE”, in A Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words, Obsolete Phrases, Proverbs, and Ancient Customs, from the Fourteenth Century. […] In Two Volumes, volume I (A–I), London: John Russell Smith, [], OCLC 1008510154, page 365, column 2.
  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “fluke”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

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