fluent vs liquid what difference

what is difference between fluent and liquid

English

Etymology

Latin fluens (flowing), present active participle of fluō (I flow).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈfluːənt/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈfluənt/
  • (obsolete) IPA(key): /ˈfljuːɛnt/
  • Rhymes: -ʊənt

Adjective

fluent (comparative more fluent, superlative most fluent)

  1. That flows; flowing, liquid.
  2. (linguistics) Able to use a language accurately, rapidly, and confidently – in a flowing way.

Usage notes

In casual use, “fluency” refers to language proficiency broadly, while in narrow use it refers to using a language flowingly, rather than haltingly.

Synonyms

  • (that flows): fluent; see also Thesaurus:flowing or Thesaurus:runny

Related terms

  • fluency
  • fluently

Translations

Noun

fluent (plural fluents)

  1. (mathematics, obsolete) A continuous variable, especially one with respect to time in Newton’s Method of Fluxions.

References

Anagrams

  • netful, unfelt

Latin

Verb

fluent

  1. third-person plural future active indicative of fluō

Old French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin fluens.

Adjective

fluent m (oblique and nominative feminine singular fluent or fluente)

  1. (of a liquid) flowing; that flows

Related terms

  • fluer

Romanian

Etymology

From French fluent

Adjective

fluent m or n (feminine singular fluentă, masculine plural fluenți, feminine and neuter plural fluente)

  1. fluent

Declension



English

Etymology

From Middle English liquide, from Old French liquide, from Latin liquidus (fluid, liquid, moist), from liqueō (to be liquid, be fluid), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *wleykʷ- (to flow, run). Doublet of liquidus. As a term for a consonant, it comes from Latin liquida (cōnsōnāns), a calque of Ancient Greek ὑγρὸν (σύμφωνον) (hugròn (súmphōnon), liquid consonant).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: lĭk’wĭd, IPA(key): /ˈlɪkwɪd/
  • Hyphenation: liq‧uid

Noun

liquid (countable and uncountable, plural liquids)

  1. A substance that is flowing, and keeping no shape, such as water; a substance of which the molecules, while not tending to separate from one another like those of a gas, readily change their relative position, and which therefore retains no definite shape, except that determined by the containing receptacle; an inelastic fluid.
    Coordinate terms: solid, gas
    Hyponyms: ideal liquid, non-ideal liquid
  2. (phonetics) Any of a class of consonant sounds that includes l and r.
    Hypernyms: approximant, consonant
    Coordinate term: glide
    • 1996, Adrian Room, An Alphabetical Guide to the Language of Name Studies (page 41)
      Many female forenames are regarded as euphonyms. What is and is not euphonious is necessarily subjective, but it could be suggested that names containing labials (b, m), sibilants (s, sh) and liquids (l, r) are more likely to be euphonyms than those that do not.

Usage notes

The differentiation of a liquid as an incompressible fluid is not strictly correct, experiments having shown that liquids are compressible to a very limited extent. See fluid.

Derived terms

  • washing-up liquid

Related terms

Translations

See also

  • fluid

Adjective

liquid (comparative more liquid, superlative most liquid)

  1. Flowing freely like water; fluid; not solid and not gaseous; composed of particles that move freely among each other on the slightest pressure.
  2. (finance, of an asset) Easily sold or disposed of without losing value.
  3. (finance, of a market) Having sufficient trading activity to make buying or selling easy.
  4. Flowing or sounding smoothly or without abrupt transitions or harsh tones.
  5. (phonology) Pronounced without any jar or harshness; smooth.
  6. Fluid and transparent.

Synonyms

  • (flowing freely like water): flowy, fluxive; see also Thesaurus:runny

Antonyms

  • (flowing freely): solid; gaseous
  • (easily sold): illiquid
  • (having sufficient activity): illiquid

Derived terms

  • liquid soap

Related terms

Translations

Further reading

  • liquid in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • liquid in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • liquid on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Middle English

Adjective

liquid

  1. Alternative form of liquide

Occitan

Etymology

From Latin liquidus.

Pronunciation

Adjective

liquid m (feminine singular liquida, masculine plural liquids, feminine plural liquidas)

  1. liquid

Derived terms

  • liquidar

Noun

liquid m (plural liquids)

  1. liquid

Further reading

  • Joan de Cantalausa (2006) Diccionari general occitan a partir dels parlars lengadocians, 2 edition, →ISBN, page 607.

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