fluff vs ruffle what difference

what is difference between fluff and ruffle

English

Etymology

From earlier floow (woolly substance, down, nap, lint), also spelt flough, flue, and flew, from West Flemish vluwe,
of uncertain ultimate origin:

  • Compare Old English flōh (that which is flown off, fragment, piece) – see flaw
  • Possibly representing a blend of flue +‎ puff; compare Middle Dutch vloe, or perhaps onomatopoeic; compare dialectal English floose, flooze, fleeze (particles of wool or cotton; fluff; loose threads or fibres), Danish fnug (down, fluff), Swedish fnugg (speck, flake).
  • Alternatively, West Flemish vluwe may derive from French velu (hairy, furry), ultimately from Latin villus (shaggy hair, tuft of hair).

For words of similar sound and meaning in other languages, compare Japanese フワフワ (fuwafuwa, lightly, softly), Hungarian puha (“soft, fluffy”), Polish puchaty (“soft, fluffy”).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /flʌf/
  • Rhymes: -ʌf

Noun

fluff (plural fluffs)

  1. Anything light, soft or fuzzy, especially fur, hair, feathers.
  2. Anything inconsequential or superficial.
  3. (informal) A lapse or mistake, especially a mistake in an actor’s lines.
    Synonym: flub
  4. (New England) Marshmallow creme.
    That New England-style salami and fluff sandwich sure hit the spot!
  5. (LGBT) A passive partner in a lesbian relationship.
  6. (Australia, euphemistic) A fart.

(Can we add an example for this sense?)

Synonyms

  • (anything light, soft or fuzzy): fuzz, oose (Scotland), puff
  • (anything inconsequential or superficial): BS, cruft, hype, all talk
  • (a lapse): blooper, blunder, boo-boo, defect, error, fault, faux pas, gaffe, lapse, mistake, slip, stumble, thinko
  • (passive in a lesbian relationship): ruffle
  • See also Thesaurus:error

Derived terms

  • bit of fluff
  • bumfluff
  • fluffball
  • fluffhead
  • fluffiness
  • fluffless
  • flufflike
  • fluffy
  • marshmallow fluff

Translations

See also

  • dust
  • lint
  • plumage

Verb

fluff (third-person singular simple present fluffs, present participle fluffing, simple past and past participle fluffed)

  1. (transitive) To make something fluffy.
    The cat fluffed its tail.
  2. (intransitive) To become fluffy, puff up.
  3. (intransitive) To move lightly like fluff.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Holmes to this entry?)
  4. (informal, transitive, intransitive, of an actor or announcer) To make a mistake in one’s lines.
    Synonym: flub
  5. (informal, transitive) To do incorrectly, for example mishit, miskick, miscue etc.
    Synonym: flub
  6. (intransitive, Australia, euphemistic) To fart.
  7. (transitive, slang) To arouse (a male pornographic actor) before filming.
    • 2008, Blue Blake, Out of the Blue: Confessions of an Unlikely Porn Star (page 187)
      To get Lance Bronson hard, Chi Chi, in desperation, called Sharon Kane to come and fluff him on the set. People were always asking me how they could get a job as a fluffer.

Derived terms

  • fluff-dry
  • fluffer
  • fluff girl
  • fluff up
  • mattress fluffer

Translations

Further reading

  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “fluff”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Swedish

Noun

fluff c

  1. fluffy (and absorbent) stuff in a baby’s diaper

Declension

Synonyms

  • fluffmassa

Related terms

  • fluffa
  • fluffig

References

  • fluff in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)


English

Etymology

From Middle English ruffelen, perhaps from Old Norse hrufla (to graze, scratch) or Middle Low German ruffelen (to wrinkle, curl). Further origin unknown. Related to Middle Dutch ruyffelen, German Low German ruffeln. See English ruff.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɹʌfəl/
  • Rhymes: -ʌfəl

Noun

ruffle (plural ruffles)

  1. Any gathered or curled strip of fabric added as trim or decoration.
  2. Disturbance; agitation; commotion.
  3. (military) A low, vibrating beat of a drum, quieter than a roll; a ruff.
  4. (zoology) The connected series of large egg capsules, or oothecae, of several species of American marine gastropods of the genus Fulgur.

Synonyms

  • (strip of fabric): frill, furbelow

Translations

Verb

ruffle (third-person singular simple present ruffles, present participle ruffling, simple past and past participle ruffled)

  1. (transitive) To make a ruffle in; to curl or flute, as an edge of fabric.
  2. (transitive) To disturb; especially, to cause to flutter.
    • 1832, Isaac Taylor, Saturday Evening
      the fantastic revelries [] that so often ruffled the placid bosom of the Nile
    • 1860, Sir William Hamilton, Sir William Hamilton, 9th Baronet
      These ruffle the tranquillity of the mind.
    • 1859, Alfred Tennyson, Guinevere
  3. (intransitive) To grow rough, boisterous, or turbulent.
  4. (intransitive) To become disordered; to play loosely; to flutter.
  5. (intransitive) To be rough; to jar; to be in contention; hence, to put on airs; to swagger.
  6. To make into a ruff; to draw or contract into puckers, plaits, or folds; to wrinkle.
  7. To erect in a ruff, as feathers.
    • 1832, Alfred Tennyson, The Palace of Art
  8. (military) To beat with the ruff or ruffle, as a drum.
  9. To throw together in a disorderly manner.

Translations

Derived terms

  • rufflement
  • ruffler
  • ruffle some feathers
  • ruffle up
  • ruffly
  • unruffled

References

Anagrams

  • Fulfer, luffer

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