flurry vs stir what difference

what is difference between flurry and stir

English

Etymology

Perhaps an American English blend of flutter and hurry. Alternatively, perhaps from an obsolete term flurr (scatter).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈflʌɹi/ (accents with the “Foot-strut” split)
  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈflʊɹi/ (accents without the “Foot-strut” split)
  • Rhymes: -ʌri
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈflʌɹi/ (accents without the “Hurry-furry” merger)
    • Rhymes: -ʌri
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈflɝ.ɹi/ (accents with the “Hurry-furry” merger)

Noun

flurry (plural flurries)

  1. A light, brief snowfall.
  2. A sudden and brief blast or gust; a light, temporary breeze.
    a flurry of wind
  3. A shower of dust, leaves etc. brought on by a sudden gust of wind.
  4. (figuratively) Any sudden activity; a stir.
    • 1998, Gillian Catriona Ramchand, Deconstructing the Lexicon, in Miriam Butt and Wilhelm Geuder, eds. “The Projection of Arguments”
      These [argument structure] modifications are important because they have provoked a flurry of investigation into argument structure operations of merger, demotion etc.
  5. A snack consisting of soft ice cream mixed with small pieces of fruit, cookie crumbs, etc.
    • 1988, K. Wayne Wride, Fruit Treats (in Vegetarian Times number 134, October 1988, page 27)
      Does your “Forbidden Foods” list include banana splits, ice cream sundaes, slurpies, popsicles, frozen yogurts, milk shakes, and ice cream flurries? These foods taste great but have a reputation for being bad for your health.
    • 2002, Tampa Bay Magazine (volume 17, number 3, May-June 2002, page 235)
      They will make your tongue smile with their homemade ice cream, which was voted “Best Taste in the USA Today.” Enjoy exciting toppings to personalize your treat or a yummy sundae, flurry, smoothie, banana split or shake…
  6. The violent spasms of a dying whale.
  7. An occurrence of something (countable instances) in large numbers, happening suddenly or in a short period of time.
    Synonyms: volley, barrage

Translations

Verb

flurry (third-person singular simple present flurries, present participle flurrying, simple past and past participle flurried)

  1. (transitive) To agitate, bewilder, fluster.
    • 1848, William Makepeace Thackeray, Vanity Fair, Chapter 1:
      And so venturing not to say another word, poor Jemima trotted off, exceedingly flurried and nervous.
  2. (intransitive) To move or fall in a flurry.

Translations



English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /stɜː/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /stɝ/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)

Etymology 1

From Middle English stiren, sturien, from Old English styrian (to be in motion, move, agitate, stir, disturb, trouble), from Proto-Germanic *sturiz (turmoil, noise, confusion), related to Proto-West Germanic *staurijan (to destroy, disturb). Cognate with Old Norse styrr (turmoil, noise, confusion), German stören (to disturb), Dutch storen (to disturb).

Verb

stir (third-person singular simple present stirs, present participle stirring, simple past and past participle stirred)

  1. (transitive) To incite to action
    Synonyms: arouse, instigate, prompt, excite; see also Thesaurus:incite
  2. (transitive) To disturb the relative position of the particles of, a liquid of suchlike, by passing something through it
    Synonym: agitate
  3. (transitive) To agitate the content of (a container), by passing something through it.
  4. (transitive) To bring into debate; to agitate; to moot.
  5. (transitive, dated) To change the place of in any manner; to move.
  6. (intransitive) To move; to change one’s position.
  7. (intransitive) To be in motion; to be active or bustling; to exert or busy oneself.
  8. (intransitive) To become the object of notice; to be on foot.
  9. (intransitive, poetic) To rise, or be up and about, in the morning.
    Synonyms: arise, get up, rouse; see also Thesaurus:wake
    • “Mid-Lent, and the Enemy grins,” remarked Selwyn as he started for church with Nina and the children. Austin, knee-deep in a dozen Sunday supplements, refused to stir; poor little Eileen was now convalescent from grippe, but still unsteady on her legs; her maid had taken the grippe, and now moaned all day: “Mon dieu! Mon dieu! Che fais mourir!

For more quotations using this term, see Citations:stir.

Usage notes
  • In all transitive senses except the dated one (“to change the place of in any manner”), stir is often followed by up with an intensive effect; as, to stir up fire; to stir up sedition.
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

stir (countable and uncountable, plural stirs)

  1. The act or result of stirring (moving around the particles of a liquid etc.)
  2. agitation; tumult; bustle; noise or various movements.
    • 1668, John Denham, Of Prudence (poem).
      Why all these words, this clamour, and this stir?
    • .
      Consider, after so much stir about genus and species, how few words we have yet settled definitions of.
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:stir.
  3. Public disturbance or commotion; tumultuous disorder; seditious uproar.
    • 1612, Sir John Davies, Discoverie of the True Causes why Ireland was never entirely subdued
      Being advertised of some stirs raised by his unnatural sons in England.
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:stir.
  4. Agitation of thoughts; conflicting passions.

Derived terms

  • cause a stir
  • stirless
  • upstir
Translations

Etymology 2

From Romani stariben (prison), nominalisation of (a)star (seize), causative of ast (remain), probably from Sanskrit आतिष्ठति (ātiṣṭhati, stand or remain by), from तिष्ठति (tiṣṭhati, stand).

Noun

stir (countable and uncountable, plural stirs)

  1. (slang) Jail; prison.
    • 1928, Jack Callahan, Man’s Grim Justice: My Life Outside the Law (page 42)
      Sing Sing was a tough joint in those days, one of the five worst stirs in the United States.
    • The Bat—they called him the Bat. []. He’d never been in stir, the bulls had never mugged him, he didn’t run with a mob, he played a lone hand, and fenced his stuff so that even the fence couldn’t swear he knew his face.
Derived terms
  • stir-crazy

Anagrams

  • ISTR, RTIs, Rist, TRIS, TRIs, Tris, rits, sirt, tris, tris-

Danish

Verb

stir

  1. imperative of stirre

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