flush vs heyday what difference

what is difference between flush and heyday

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈflʌʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ʌʃ

Etymology 1

From Middle English flusshen, fluschen, of uncertain origin. Perhaps related to Middle English flasshen, flasschen, flaschen, see flash; or a Middle English blend of flowen (to flow) +‎ guschen (to gush). Compare with German flutschen.

Noun

flush (plural flushes)

  1. A group of birds that have suddenly started up from undergrowth, trees etc.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, V.2:
      As when a Faulcon hath with nimble flight / Flowne at a flush of Ducks foreby the brooke […].

Verb

flush (third-person singular simple present flushes, present participle flushing, simple past and past participle flushed)

  1. (transitive) To cause to take flight from concealment.
  2. (intransitive) To take suddenly to flight, especially from cover.
    • 1613, William Browne, Britannia’s Pastorals
      flushing from one spray unto another
    • 1972, United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Appropriations. Subcommittee on Department of Defense, Department of Defense Appropriations for Fiscal Year 1973 (page 460)
      AWACS is survivable due to its ability to flush on warning, to maneuver at jet speeds, to maintain awareness of the developing air situation and to command weapons as appropriate, including weapons for its own defense.
Translations

Etymology 2

Same as Etymology 3, according to the American Heritage Dictionary.

Adjective

flush (comparative flusher, superlative flushest)

  1. Smooth, even, aligned; not sticking out.
  2. Wealthy or well off.
  3. (typography) Short for flush left and right; a body of text aligned with both its left and right margins.
  4. Full of vigour; fresh; glowing; bright.
  5. Affluent; abounding; well furnished or suppled; hence, liberal; prodigal.
    • 1712, John Arbuthnot, The History of John Bull
      Lord Strut was not very flush in ready.
Synonyms
  • (typography): double-clean, flush left and right, forced, forced justified, force justified, justified
Derived terms
  • flush left, flush right, flush left and right
Translations

Etymology 3

Probably from Etymology 1 according to the American Heritage Dictionary.

Noun

flush (plural flushes)

  1. A sudden flowing; a rush which fills or overflows, as of water for cleansing purposes.
    • in manner of a wave or flush
  2. Particularly, such a cleansing of a toilet.
  3. A suffusion of the face with blood, as from fear, shame, modesty, or intensity of feeling of any kind; a blush; a glow.
    • 1830, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Madeline
      the flush of anger’d shame
  4. Any tinge of red colour like that produced on the cheeks by a sudden rush of blood.
  5. A sudden flood or rush of feeling; a thrill of excitement, animation, etc.
Translations

Verb

flush (third-person singular simple present flushes, present participle flushing, simple past and past participle flushed)

  1. (transitive) To cleanse by flooding with generous quantities of a fluid.
  2. (transitive) Particularly, to cleanse a toilet by introducing a large amount of water.
  3. (intransitive) To become suffused with reddish color due to embarrassment, excitement, overheating, or other systemic disturbance, to blush.
    • 1872, The Argosy. Edited by Mrs. Henry Wood. Volume XIV. July to December, 1872, London, p. 60 (Google)
      She turned, laughing at the surprise, and flushing with pleasure.
  4. (transitive) To cause to blush.
    • Nor flush with shame the passing virgin’s cheek.
    • 1925, Fruit of the Flower, by Countee Cullen
      “Who plants a seed begets a bud, — Extract of that same root; — Why marvel at the hectic blood — That flushes this wild fruit?”
  5. To cause to be full; to flood; to overflow; to overwhelm with water.
  6. (transitive) To excite, inflame.
    • , “Against Long Extemporary Prayers”
      such things as can only feed his pride and flush his ambition
  7. (intransitive, of a toilet) To be cleansed by being flooded with generous quantities of water.
  8. (transitive, computing) To clear (a buffer) of its contents.
  9. To flow and spread suddenly; to rush.
    • 1545, John Bale, The Image of Both Churches
      the flushing noise of many waters
  10. To show red; to shine suddenly; to glow.
  11. (masonry) To fill in (joints); to point the level; to make them flush.
  12. (mining, intransitive) To operate a placer mine, where the continuous supply of water is insufficient, by holding back the water, and releasing it periodically in a flood.
  13. (mining) To fill underground spaces, especially in coal mines, with material carried by water, which, after drainage, constitutes a compact mass.
  14. (intransitive, transitive) To dispose or be disposed of by flushing down a toilet
Usage notes

In sense “turn red with embarrassment”, blush is more common. More finely, in indicating the actual change, blush is usual – “He blushed with embarrassment” – but in indicating state, flushed is also common – “He was flushed with excitement”.

Synonyms
  • (turn red with embarrassment): blush
Translations

Etymology 4

Probably from Middle French flus (flow), cognate with flux.

Noun

flush (plural flushes)

  1. (poker) A hand consisting of all cards with the same suit.
Derived terms
Descendants
  • French: flush
  • Korean: 플러쉬 (peulleoswi)
  • Portuguese: flush
Translations

See also


French

Etymology

From English flush.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /flœʃ/

Noun

flush m (plural flushs)

  1. (poker) flush
  2. (anglicism) flush (reddening of the face)
  3. (anglicism, IT) emptying of the cache

Synonyms

  • (poker): couleur

Derived terms

  • quinte flush

Derived terms

  • flusher

Portuguese

Etymology

From English flush.

Noun

flush m (plural flushes)

  1. (poker) flush (hand consisting of all cards with the same suit)


English

Etymology

Late 16th century, from earlier heyda (1520s), as exclamation – compare hey, hei. Sense “period of success, vigor” from 1751, which respelt as heyday based on unrelated day (as “period of time”) – compare day in the sun.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈheɪdeɪ/
  • Rhymes: -eɪdeɪ

Noun

heyday (plural heydays)

  1. A period of success, popularity, or power; prime.
    The early twentieth century was the heyday of the steam locomotive.
  2. (archaic) An exultation of the spirits; gaiety; frolic.

Synonyms

  • day in the sun
  • golden age
  • golden years

Related terms

  • hey

Translations

Interjection

heyday

  1. A lively greeting.
    • 1798, Jane Austen – Northanger Abbey:
      Heyday, Miss Morland!” said he. “What is the meaning of this? I thought you and I were to dance together.”
  2. (obsolete) An expression of frolic and exultation, and sometimes of wonder.
    • 1600, Ben Jonson – Cynthia’s Revels :
      “Come follow me, my wags, and say, as I say. There’s no riches but in rags; hey day, hey day, &c.”
    • Here Jones, having ordered a servant to show a room above stairs, was ascending, when the dishevelled fair, hastily following, was laid hold on by the master of the house, who cried, “Heyday, where is that beggar wench going? Stay below stairs, I desire you.”

Synonyms

  • (greeting): See Thesaurus:hello
  • (expression of wonder): See Thesaurus:wow

References


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