flush vs loaded what difference

what is difference between flush and loaded

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈflʌʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ʌʃ

Etymology 1

From Middle English flusshen, fluschen, of uncertain origin. Perhaps related to Middle English flasshen, flasschen, flaschen, see flash; or a Middle English blend of flowen (to flow) +‎ guschen (to gush). Compare with German flutschen.

Noun

flush (plural flushes)

  1. A group of birds that have suddenly started up from undergrowth, trees etc.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, V.2:
      As when a Faulcon hath with nimble flight / Flowne at a flush of Ducks foreby the brooke […].

Verb

flush (third-person singular simple present flushes, present participle flushing, simple past and past participle flushed)

  1. (transitive) To cause to take flight from concealment.
  2. (intransitive) To take suddenly to flight, especially from cover.
    • 1613, William Browne, Britannia’s Pastorals
      flushing from one spray unto another
    • 1972, United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Appropriations. Subcommittee on Department of Defense, Department of Defense Appropriations for Fiscal Year 1973 (page 460)
      AWACS is survivable due to its ability to flush on warning, to maneuver at jet speeds, to maintain awareness of the developing air situation and to command weapons as appropriate, including weapons for its own defense.
Translations

Etymology 2

Same as Etymology 3, according to the American Heritage Dictionary.

Adjective

flush (comparative flusher, superlative flushest)

  1. Smooth, even, aligned; not sticking out.
  2. Wealthy or well off.
  3. (typography) Short for flush left and right; a body of text aligned with both its left and right margins.
  4. Full of vigour; fresh; glowing; bright.
  5. Affluent; abounding; well furnished or suppled; hence, liberal; prodigal.
    • 1712, John Arbuthnot, The History of John Bull
      Lord Strut was not very flush in ready.
Synonyms
  • (typography): double-clean, flush left and right, forced, forced justified, force justified, justified
Derived terms
  • flush left, flush right, flush left and right
Translations

Etymology 3

Probably from Etymology 1 according to the American Heritage Dictionary.

Noun

flush (plural flushes)

  1. A sudden flowing; a rush which fills or overflows, as of water for cleansing purposes.
    • in manner of a wave or flush
  2. Particularly, such a cleansing of a toilet.
  3. A suffusion of the face with blood, as from fear, shame, modesty, or intensity of feeling of any kind; a blush; a glow.
    • 1830, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Madeline
      the flush of anger’d shame
  4. Any tinge of red colour like that produced on the cheeks by a sudden rush of blood.
  5. A sudden flood or rush of feeling; a thrill of excitement, animation, etc.
Translations

Verb

flush (third-person singular simple present flushes, present participle flushing, simple past and past participle flushed)

  1. (transitive) To cleanse by flooding with generous quantities of a fluid.
  2. (transitive) Particularly, to cleanse a toilet by introducing a large amount of water.
  3. (intransitive) To become suffused with reddish color due to embarrassment, excitement, overheating, or other systemic disturbance, to blush.
    • 1872, The Argosy. Edited by Mrs. Henry Wood. Volume XIV. July to December, 1872, London, p. 60 (Google)
      She turned, laughing at the surprise, and flushing with pleasure.
  4. (transitive) To cause to blush.
    • Nor flush with shame the passing virgin’s cheek.
    • 1925, Fruit of the Flower, by Countee Cullen
      “Who plants a seed begets a bud, — Extract of that same root; — Why marvel at the hectic blood — That flushes this wild fruit?”
  5. To cause to be full; to flood; to overflow; to overwhelm with water.
  6. (transitive) To excite, inflame.
    • , “Against Long Extemporary Prayers”
      such things as can only feed his pride and flush his ambition
  7. (intransitive, of a toilet) To be cleansed by being flooded with generous quantities of water.
  8. (transitive, computing) To clear (a buffer) of its contents.
  9. To flow and spread suddenly; to rush.
    • 1545, John Bale, The Image of Both Churches
      the flushing noise of many waters
  10. To show red; to shine suddenly; to glow.
  11. (masonry) To fill in (joints); to point the level; to make them flush.
  12. (mining, intransitive) To operate a placer mine, where the continuous supply of water is insufficient, by holding back the water, and releasing it periodically in a flood.
  13. (mining) To fill underground spaces, especially in coal mines, with material carried by water, which, after drainage, constitutes a compact mass.
  14. (intransitive, transitive) To dispose or be disposed of by flushing down a toilet
Usage notes

In sense “turn red with embarrassment”, blush is more common. More finely, in indicating the actual change, blush is usual – “He blushed with embarrassment” – but in indicating state, flushed is also common – “He was flushed with excitement”.

Synonyms
  • (turn red with embarrassment): blush
Translations

Etymology 4

Probably from Middle French flus (flow), cognate with flux.

Noun

flush (plural flushes)

  1. (poker) A hand consisting of all cards with the same suit.
Derived terms
Descendants
  • French: flush
  • Korean: 플러쉬 (peulleoswi)
  • Portuguese: flush
Translations

See also


French

Etymology

From English flush.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /flœʃ/

Noun

flush m (plural flushs)

  1. (poker) flush
  2. (anglicism) flush (reddening of the face)
  3. (anglicism, IT) emptying of the cache

Synonyms

  • (poker): couleur

Derived terms

  • quinte flush

Derived terms

  • flusher

Portuguese

Etymology

From English flush.

Noun

flush m (plural flushes)

  1. (poker) flush (hand consisting of all cards with the same suit)


English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈloʊdɪd/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈləʊdɪd/
  • Hyphenation: load‧ed

Verb

loaded

  1. simple past tense and past participle of load

Adjective

loaded (comparative more loaded, superlative most loaded)

  1. Burdened by some heavy load; packed.
    Synonyms: crammed, laden, packed, stuffed
    • 1737, The Gentleman’s Magazine, Volume 7, page 780,
      With regard to France and Holland, therefore, I muſt think, Sir, and it has always been the general Opinion, that the Subjects of each are more loaded and more oppreſſed with Taxes and Exciſes than the People of this Kingdom ;
    • 1812, Edinburgh Medical and Surgical Journal, Volume 8, page 118,
      [] the fever began to assume a low type ; the tongue became loaded with a thick brown crust ; [] .
    • 1888, Leonardo Da Vinci, Jean Paul Richter (translator), The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, XIII: Theoretical writings on Architecture,
      [] and for that reason the arches of the vaults of any apse should never be more loaded than the arches of the principal building.
    • 1913, Africa, article in Catholic Encyclopedia,
      What is known concerning supernatural matters is a sort of common deposit, guarded by everybody, and handed down without any intervention on the part of an authority; fuller in one place, scantier in another, or, again, more loaded with external symbols according to the intelligence, the temperament, the organization, the habits, and the manner of the people’s life.
    • 2011, Matt Rogan, Martin Rogan, Britain and the Olympic Games: Past, Present, Legacy, page 15,
      What had traditionally been a morally neutral sport became loaded with a set of Victorian values.
  2. (of a projectile weapon) Having a live round of ammunition in the chamber.
    Synonyms: armed, primed
  3. (slang) Possessing great wealth.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:wealthy
  4. (slang) Drunk.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:drunk
  5. (baseball) Pertaining to a situation where there is a runner at each of the three bases.
  6. (dice games, also used figuratively) Of a die or dice: weighted asymmetrically, and so biased to produce predictable throws.
    Synonyms: fixed, rigged, weighted
    • 1996, Elaine Creith, Undressing Lesbian Sex, page 49,
      The more we invest in a sexual encounter in a particular person, the more loaded the dice in a dating game that we are forever reminded we must play to win.
    • 1997, Joe Slovo, Slovo: The Unfinished Autobiography, page 80,
      If you add to this the fact that the magistrate and the police sergeant are close friends, then the dice could not have been more loaded against my client.
    • 2009, Michèle Lowrie, Horace: Odes and Epodes, page 224,
      Horace has been crippled by being set off against the ‘sincerity’ and ‘spontaneity’ of these two; when it comes to the Greek lyricists, the dice are even more loaded against our poet, for the Greeks have not only spontaneity and sincerity on their side, but a phalanx of yet more formidable allies [] .
  7. (of a question) Designed to produce a predictable answer, or to lay a trap.
    Synonym: leading
  8. (of a word or phrase) Having strong connotations that colour the literal meaning and are likely to provoke an emotional response. Sometimes used loosely to describe a word that simply has many different meanings.
    Synonyms: charged, freighted, pregnant
    • 2003, L. Susan Bond, Contemporary African American Preaching: Diversity in Theory and Style, page 30,
      The more loaded phrase is the middle one, “she slit his gullet,” since it captures a sense of crudeness and suddenness that the other two do not.
  9. (of an item offered for sale, especially an automobile) Equipped with numerous options.
    Synonym: deluxe
  10. (food, colloquial) Covered with a topping or toppings.
  11. Weighted with lead or similar.
    a loaded cane or whip

Derived terms

  • loaded for bear

Translations

Anagrams

  • deload

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