flush vs prime what difference

what is difference between flush and prime

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈflʌʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ʌʃ

Etymology 1

From Middle English flusshen, fluschen, of uncertain origin. Perhaps related to Middle English flasshen, flasschen, flaschen, see flash; or a Middle English blend of flowen (to flow) +‎ guschen (to gush). Compare with German flutschen.

Noun

flush (plural flushes)

  1. A group of birds that have suddenly started up from undergrowth, trees etc.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, V.2:
      As when a Faulcon hath with nimble flight / Flowne at a flush of Ducks foreby the brooke […].

Verb

flush (third-person singular simple present flushes, present participle flushing, simple past and past participle flushed)

  1. (transitive) To cause to take flight from concealment.
  2. (intransitive) To take suddenly to flight, especially from cover.
    • 1613, William Browne, Britannia’s Pastorals
      flushing from one spray unto another
    • 1972, United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Appropriations. Subcommittee on Department of Defense, Department of Defense Appropriations for Fiscal Year 1973 (page 460)
      AWACS is survivable due to its ability to flush on warning, to maneuver at jet speeds, to maintain awareness of the developing air situation and to command weapons as appropriate, including weapons for its own defense.
Translations

Etymology 2

Same as Etymology 3, according to the American Heritage Dictionary.

Adjective

flush (comparative flusher, superlative flushest)

  1. Smooth, even, aligned; not sticking out.
  2. Wealthy or well off.
  3. (typography) Short for flush left and right; a body of text aligned with both its left and right margins.
  4. Full of vigour; fresh; glowing; bright.
  5. Affluent; abounding; well furnished or suppled; hence, liberal; prodigal.
    • 1712, John Arbuthnot, The History of John Bull
      Lord Strut was not very flush in ready.
Synonyms
  • (typography): double-clean, flush left and right, forced, forced justified, force justified, justified
Derived terms
  • flush left, flush right, flush left and right
Translations

Etymology 3

Probably from Etymology 1 according to the American Heritage Dictionary.

Noun

flush (plural flushes)

  1. A sudden flowing; a rush which fills or overflows, as of water for cleansing purposes.
    • in manner of a wave or flush
  2. Particularly, such a cleansing of a toilet.
  3. A suffusion of the face with blood, as from fear, shame, modesty, or intensity of feeling of any kind; a blush; a glow.
    • 1830, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Madeline
      the flush of anger’d shame
  4. Any tinge of red colour like that produced on the cheeks by a sudden rush of blood.
  5. A sudden flood or rush of feeling; a thrill of excitement, animation, etc.
Translations

Verb

flush (third-person singular simple present flushes, present participle flushing, simple past and past participle flushed)

  1. (transitive) To cleanse by flooding with generous quantities of a fluid.
  2. (transitive) Particularly, to cleanse a toilet by introducing a large amount of water.
  3. (intransitive) To become suffused with reddish color due to embarrassment, excitement, overheating, or other systemic disturbance, to blush.
    • 1872, The Argosy. Edited by Mrs. Henry Wood. Volume XIV. July to December, 1872, London, p. 60 (Google)
      She turned, laughing at the surprise, and flushing with pleasure.
  4. (transitive) To cause to blush.
    • Nor flush with shame the passing virgin’s cheek.
    • 1925, Fruit of the Flower, by Countee Cullen
      “Who plants a seed begets a bud, — Extract of that same root; — Why marvel at the hectic blood — That flushes this wild fruit?”
  5. To cause to be full; to flood; to overflow; to overwhelm with water.
  6. (transitive) To excite, inflame.
    • , “Against Long Extemporary Prayers”
      such things as can only feed his pride and flush his ambition
  7. (intransitive, of a toilet) To be cleansed by being flooded with generous quantities of water.
  8. (transitive, computing) To clear (a buffer) of its contents.
  9. To flow and spread suddenly; to rush.
    • 1545, John Bale, The Image of Both Churches
      the flushing noise of many waters
  10. To show red; to shine suddenly; to glow.
  11. (masonry) To fill in (joints); to point the level; to make them flush.
  12. (mining, intransitive) To operate a placer mine, where the continuous supply of water is insufficient, by holding back the water, and releasing it periodically in a flood.
  13. (mining) To fill underground spaces, especially in coal mines, with material carried by water, which, after drainage, constitutes a compact mass.
  14. (intransitive, transitive) To dispose or be disposed of by flushing down a toilet
Usage notes

In sense “turn red with embarrassment”, blush is more common. More finely, in indicating the actual change, blush is usual – “He blushed with embarrassment” – but in indicating state, flushed is also common – “He was flushed with excitement”.

Synonyms
  • (turn red with embarrassment): blush
Translations

Etymology 4

Probably from Middle French flus (flow), cognate with flux.

Noun

flush (plural flushes)

  1. (poker) A hand consisting of all cards with the same suit.
Derived terms
Descendants
  • French: flush
  • Korean: 플러쉬 (peulleoswi)
  • Portuguese: flush
Translations

See also


French

Etymology

From English flush.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /flœʃ/

Noun

flush m (plural flushs)

  1. (poker) flush
  2. (anglicism) flush (reddening of the face)
  3. (anglicism, IT) emptying of the cache

Synonyms

  • (poker): couleur

Derived terms

  • quinte flush

Derived terms

  • flusher

Portuguese

Etymology

From English flush.

Noun

flush m (plural flushes)

  1. (poker) flush (hand consisting of all cards with the same suit)


English

Etymology 1

Borrowed from French prime, from Latin primus (first), from earlier prīsmos < *prīsemos < Proto-Italic *priisemos, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *per- (beyond, before). Doublet of primo.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: prīm, IPA(key): /pɹaɪ̯m/
  • Hyphenation: prime
  • Rhymes: -aɪm

Adjective

prime (comparative primer, superlative primest)

  1. First in importance, degree, or rank.
    Synonyms: greatest, main, most important, primary, principal, top
  2. First in time, order, or sequence.
    Synonyms: earliest, first, original
  3. First in excellence, quality, or value.
    Synonyms: excellent, top quality
    • 1820, Thomas Moore, W. Simpkin, R. Marshall, Jack Randall’s Diary of Proceedings at the House of Call for Genius
      Gemmen (says he), you all well know / The joy there is whene’er we meet; / It’s what I call the primest go, / And rightly named, ’tis—’quite a treat,’ []
    • 1861, Isabella Beeton, Mrs Beeton’s Book of Household Management
      Average cost, 10d. to 18. per lb. for the primest parts.
  4. (mathematics, lay) Having exactly two integral factors: itself and unity (1 in the case of integers).
  5. (mathematics, technical) Such that if it divides a product, it divides one of the multiplicands.
  6. (mathematics) Having its complement closed under multiplication: said only of ideals.
  7. Marked or distinguished by the prime symbol.
  8. Early; blooming; being in the first stage.
  9. (obsolete) Lecherous, lewd, lustful.
Synonyms
  • (having no nontrivial factors): indivisible
Hyponyms
  • biprime
  • pseudoprime
  • semiprime
  • (having exactly two integral factors): coprime
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

prime (plural primes)

  1. (historical) The first hour of daylight; the first canonical hour.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, London: William Ponsonbie, Book 2, Canto 9, p. 314,[1]
      His larum bell might lowd and wyde be hard,
      When cause requyrd, but neuer out of time;
      Early and late it rong, at euening and at prime.
  2. (Christianity) The religious service appointed to this hour.
  3. (obsolete) The early morning generally.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, London: William Ponsonbie, Book 1, Canto 6, p. 81,[2]
      They all as glad, as birdes of ioyous Pryme []
  4. (now rare) The earliest stage of something.
    • 1593, Richard Hooker, Of the Lawes of Ecclesiasticall Politie, London, 1604, Book 1, p. 69,[3]
      To this end we see how quickly sundry artes Mechanical were found out in the very prime of the world.
    • 1645, Edmund Waller, “To a very young Lady” (earlier title: “To my young Lady Lucy Sidney”) in Poems, &c. Written upon Several Occasions, and to Several Persons, London: H. Herringman, 1686, p. 101,[4]
      Hope waits upon the flowry prime,
  5. The most active, thriving, or successful stage or period.
    • c. 1609, William Shakespeare, Sonnet 12,[5]
      When I do count the clock that tells the time,
      And see the brave day sunk in hideous night;
      When I behold the violet past prime,
      And sable curls all silver’d o’er with white;
    • 1813, John Chetwode Eustace, A Tour through Italy, London: J. Mawman, Volume 1, Chapter 10, pp. 225-226,[6]
      None but foreigners, excluded by their religion from the cemeteries of the country, are deposited here [] . The far greater part had been cut off in their prime, by unexpected disease or fatal accident.
    • 1965, Bob Dylan, Like a Rolling Stone
      Once upon a time you dressed so fine. You threw the bums a dime in your prime, didn’t you?
  6. The chief or best individual or part.
    • 1726, Jonathan Swift, “To a Lady, who desired the author to write some verses upon her in the heroic style” in The Works of Dr. Jonathan Swift, London: W. Bowyer et al., Volume 7, p. 396,[7]
      Give no more to ev’ry guest
      Than he’s able to digest:
      Give him always of the prime;
      And but a little at a time.
  7. (music) The first note or tone of a musical scale.
  8. (fencing) The first defensive position, with the sword hand held at head height, and the tip of the sword at head height.
  9. (algebra, number theory) A prime element of a mathematical structure, particularly a prime number.
  10. (card games) A four-card hand containing one card of each suit in the game of primero; the opposite of a flush in poker.
  11. (backgammon) Six consecutive blocks, which prevent the opponent’s pieces from passing.
  12. The symbol ′ used to indicate feet, minutes, derivation and other measures and mathematical operations.
  13. (chemistry, obsolete) Any number expressing the combining weight or equivalent of any particular element; so called because these numbers were respectively reduced to their lowest relative terms on the fixed standard of hydrogen as 1.
  14. An inch, as composed of twelve seconds in the duodecimal system.
  15. (obsolete) The priming in a flintlock.
    • 1743, Robert Drury, The Pleasant, and Surprizing Adventures of Mr. Robert Drury, during his Fifteen Years Captivity on the Island of Madagascar, London, pp. 95–96,[8]
      [] he pull’d the Trigger, but Providence being pleas’d to preserve me for some other Purpose, the Cock snapp’d, and miss’d Fire. Whether the Prime was wet in the Pan, or by what other Miracle it was I escap’d his Fury, I cannot say []
  16. (film) Contraction of prime lens, a film lens
    • Tomlinson, Shawn M. (2015) Going Pro for $200 & How to Choose a Prime Lens, →ISBN: “By the time I shifted to my first autofocus film SLR with the Pentax PZ-10, primes were considered things of the past”
Synonyms
  • (early morning generally): See Thesaurus:early morning or Thesaurus:morning
  • (most active, thriving, or successful stage or period): bloom, blossom, efflorescence, flower, flush, heyday, peak
  • (chief or best individual or part): choice, prize, quality, select
  • (algebra: prime element of a mathematical structure): prime number (when an integer)
Antonyms
  • (algebra: prime element of a mathematical structure): composite
Hyponyms
Derived terms
  • primality
Translations

Etymology 2

Related to primage and primus.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: prīm, IPA(key): /pɹaɪ̯m/
  • Rhymes: -aɪm
  • Hyphenation: prime

Verb

prime (third-person singular simple present primes, present participle priming, simple past and past participle primed)

  1. (transitive) To prepare a mechanism for its main work.
    You’ll have to press this button twice to prime the fuel pump.
  2. (transitive) To apply a coat of primer paint to.
    I need to prime these handrails before we can apply the finish coat.
  3. (obsolete, intransitive) To be renewed.
  4. (intransitive) To serve as priming for the charge of a gun.
  5. (intransitive, of a steam boiler) To work so that foaming occurs from too violent ebullition, which causes water to become mixed with, and be carried along with, the steam that is formed.
  6. To apply priming to (a musket or cannon); to apply a primer to (a metallic cartridge).
  7. To prepare; to make ready; to instruct beforehand; to coach.
    to prime a witness
    The boys are primed for mischief.
  8. (Britain, dialect, obsolete) To trim or prune.
    to prime trees
  9. (mathematics) To mark with a prime mark.
Synonyms
  • (to apply a coat of primer paint to): ground, undercoat
Translations

Etymology 3

From French prime (reward, prize, bonus).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɹiːm/
  • Rhymes: -iːm

Noun

prime (plural primes)

  1. (cycling) An intermediate sprint within a race, usually offering a prize and/or points.
    • 1997 Arnie Baker, Smart Cycling: Successful Training and Racing for Riders of All Levels
      Most primes are won with gaps on the field; most sprints are in bunches.

Derived terms

  • primer

Related terms

Anagrams

  • Priem, emirp, imper.

Albanian

Etymology

From proj (to guard, defend).

Noun

prime f pl (definite plural primet)

  1. remedies

Related terms

  • proj

References


French

Etymology

From the feminine of Old French prim, prin, from Latin prīmus, from earlier prīsmos < *prīsemos < Proto-Italic *priisemos.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pʁim/
  • Rhymes: -im

Adjective

prime (plural primes)

  1. first thing

Derived terms

  • de prime abord

Noun

prime f (plural primes)

  1. reward; prize; bonus
  2. premium (insurance policy)

Derived terms

  • chasseur de primes
  • en prime
  • prime de départ
  • prime de bienvenue

Further reading

  • “prime” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • imper

Interlingua

Adjective

prime

  1. first

Italian

Adjective

prime

  1. feminine plural of primo

Anagrams

  • premi

Latin

Numeral

prīme

  1. vocative masculine singular of prīmus

References

  • prime in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • prime in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈpri.me]

Adjective

prime

  1. nominative feminine plural of prim
  2. accusative feminine plural of prim
  3. nominative neuter plural of prim
  4. accusative neuter plural of prim

Spanish

Verb

prime

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of primar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of primar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of primar.

Tarantino

Adjective

prime

  1. first

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