fluster vs perturbation what difference

what is difference between fluster and perturbation

English

Etymology

From a Scandinavian (North Germanic) language, akin to Icelandic flaustra (to be flustered).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈflʌstə/
  • Rhymes: -ʌstə(r)

Verb

fluster (third-person singular simple present flusters, present participle flustering, simple past and past participle flustered)

  1. (dated) To make hot and rosy, as with drinking.
  2. (by extension) To confuse; befuddle; throw into panic by making overwrought with confusion.
  3. (intransitive) To be in a heat or bustle; to be agitated and confused.
    • the flustring, vain-glorious Greeks

Derived terms

  • flustered (adjective)
  • flustering (adjective, present participle)

Translations

Noun

fluster (plural flusters)

  1. A state of being flustered; overwrought confusion.

Anagrams

  • RESTful, fluters, furtles, restful


English

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French perturbation, from Old French perturbacion, from Latin perturbatio

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -eɪʃən

Noun

perturbation (countable and uncountable, plural perturbations)

  1. (uncountable) Agitation; the state of being perturbed
  2. (countable) A small change in a physical system, or more broadly any definable system (such as a biological or economic system)
  3. (countable, astronomy, physics) Variation in an orbit due to the influence of external bodies

Related terms

  • perturb
  • perturbatory

Translations


French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin perturbatio, perturbationem.

Pronunciation

Noun

perturbation f (plural perturbations)

  1. disturbance
  2. derangement

Related terms

  • perturber

Descendants

  • Romanian: perturbație

Further reading

  • “perturbation” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

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