flutter vs quiver what difference

what is difference between flutter and quiver

English

Etymology

From Middle English floteren, from Old English floterian, flotorian (to float about, flutter), from Proto-Germanic *flutrōną, frequentative of Proto-Germanic *flutōną (to float), equivalent to float +‎ -er (frequentative suffix). Cognate with Low German fluttern, fluddern (to flutter), German flittern, Dutch fladderen; also Albanian flutur (butterfly). More at float.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈflʌtɚ/, [ˈflʌɾɚ]
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈflʌtə/
  • Rhymes: -ʌtə(ɹ)

Verb

flutter (third-person singular simple present flutters, present participle fluttering, simple past and past participle fluttered)

  1. (intransitive) To flap or wave quickly but irregularly.
  2. (intransitive) Of a winged animal: to flap the wings without flying; to fly with a light flapping of the wings.
  3. (intransitive, aerodynamics) To undergo divergent oscillations (potentially to the point of causing structural failure) due to a positive feedback loop between elastic deformation and aerodynamic forces.
  4. (transitive) To cause something to flap.
  5. (transitive) To drive into disorder; to throw into confusion.
  6. (intransitive) To be in a state of agitation or uncertainty.
  7. (intransitive, obsolete) To be frivolous.
  8. (espionage, slang) To subject to a lie detector test.
    • 1978, Edward Jay Epstein, Legend: The Secret World of Lee Harvey Oswald (page 38)
      This was the first time that Nosenko had been subjected to a lie detector — or what the CIA called fluttering. The Soviet Union did not use such devices for interrogation.
    • 2002, Paul Eddy, Flint’s Law (page 90)
      “Anyway, she cracked and we fluttered her and—”
      Fluttered her?”
      “Sorry, gave her a polygraph, a lie detector test. And she passed, more or less, []

Translations

Noun

flutter (countable and uncountable, plural flutters)

  1. The act of fluttering; quick and irregular motion.
    • c. 1838, Richard Monckton Milnes, The Forest
      the chirp and flutter of some single bird
  2. A state of agitation.
    • flutter of spirits
    • 1900, Henry James, The Soft Side The Third Person Chapter 3
      Their visitor was an issue – at least to the imagination, and they arrived finally, under provocation, at intensities of flutter in which they felt themselves so compromised by his hoverings that they could only consider with relief the fact of nobody’s knowing.
  3. An abnormal rapid pulsation of the heart.
  4. (uncountable, aerodynamics) An extremely dangerous divergent oscillation caused by a positive feedback loop between the elastic deformation of an object and the aerodynamic forces acting on it, potentially resulting in structural failure.
  5. (Britain) A small bet or risky investment.
    • 30 July, 2009, Eurosport, Gray Matter: How will Schu do?
      So with his victory odds currently at 14/1 or 3/1 for the podium, he’s still most certainly well worth a flutter []
  6. A hasty game of cards or similar.
  7. (audio, electronics) The rapid variation of signal parameters, such as amplitude, phase, and frequency.
    Coordinate term: wow

Derived terms

  • aflutter
  • flutter in the dovecote
  • flutterby
  • fluttersome
  • fluttery

Translations



English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈkwɪvə/
  • (General American, Canada) enPR: kwĭˈvər, IPA(key): /ˈkwɪvəɹ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪvə(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: qui‧ver

Etymology 1

From Middle English quiver, from Anglo-Norman quivre, from Old Dutch cocare (source of Dutch koker, and cognate to Old English cocer (quiver, case)), from Proto-West Germanic *kukur (container), said to be from Hunnic, possibly from Proto-Mongolic *kökexür (leather vessel for liquids); see there for more. Replaced early modern English cocker, the inherited reflex of that West Germanic word.

Noun

quiver (plural quivers)

  1. (weaponry) A container for arrows, crossbow bolts or darts, such as those fired from a bow, crossbow or blowgun.
    • 1598, William Shakespeare, Much Ado about Nothing, Act I, Scene I, line 271:
      Don Pedro: Nay, if Cupid have not spent all his quiver in Venice, thou wilt quake for this shortly.
    • 1786, Francis Grose, A Treatise on Ancient Armour and Weapons, page 39:
      Arrows were carried in quiver, called also an arrow case, which served for the magazine, arrows for immediate use were worn in the girdle.
  2. (figuratively) A ready storage location for figurative tools or weapons.
    He’s got lots of sales pitches in his quiver.
  3. (obsolete) The collective noun for cobras.
  4. (mathematics) A multidigraph.

Derived terms

  • quiverful

Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English quiver, cwiver, from Old English *cwifer, probably related to cwic (alive).

Adjective

quiver (comparative more quiver, superlative most quiver)

  1. (archaic) Nimble, active.
    • 1598, William Shakespeare, Henry V, Part II, Act III, Scene II, line 281:
      […] there was a little quiver fellow, and ‘a would manage you his piece thus; and ‘a would about and about, and come you in and come you in.

Etymology 3

From Middle English quiveren, probably from the adjective.

Verb

quiver (third-person singular simple present quivers, present participle quivering, simple past and past participle quivered)

  1. (intransitive) To shake or move with slight and tremulous motion
    Synonyms: tremble, quake, shudder, shiver
    • And left the limbs still quivering on the ground.

Derived terms

  • aquiver
  • quivering
  • quiversome

Translations

References

Further reading

  • quiver on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Anglo-Norman quivre, from Old Dutch cocare; perhaps ultimately from Proto-Mongolic *kökexür or Hunnic. Doublet of coker.

Alternative forms

  • quyver, qwyver, qwywere, qwyvere, whyver

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkwivər/

Noun

quiver (plural quivers)

  1. A quiver (a receptacle for arrows)
  2. (rare, vulgar) A vulva.
Descendants
  • English: quiver
References
  • “quiver, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-05-04.

Etymology 2

From Old English *cwifer, probably related to cwic (alive).

Alternative forms

  • quyver, quyvere, cwiver

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkwivər/

Adjective

quiver

  1. fast, speedy, rapid
  2. energetic, vigourous, vibrant
Descendants
  • English: quiver
References
  • “quiver, adj.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-05-04.

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