flux vs meld what difference

what is difference between flux and meld

English

Etymology

From Old French flux, from Latin fluxus (flow).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /flʌks/
  • Rhymes: -ʌks

Noun

flux (countable and uncountable, plural fluxes)

  1. The act of flowing; a continuous moving on or passing by, as of a flowing stream.
    • 1730, John Arbuthnot, An Essay Concerning the Nature of Aliments
      By [] the perpetual Flux of the Liquids, a great part of the Liquids is thrown out of the Body.
    • 1991, Mann, H., Fyfe, W., Tazaki, K., & Kerrich, R., Biological Accumulation of Different Chemical Elements by Microorganisms from Yellowstone National Park, USA. Mechanisms And Phylogeny Of Mineralization In Biological Systems, 357-362.
      Investigation of the silica budget for the Upper and Lower Geyser Basins of Yellowstone National Park by Truesdell et al. suggest that the present fluxes of hotspring water and thermal energy may have been continuous for at least the past 10,000 yr.
  2. A state of ongoing change.
    The schedule is in flux at the moment.
    Languages, like our bodies, are in a continual flux.
    • 1856, Richard Chenevix Trench, On the Death of an Infant
      Her image has escaped the flux of things, / And that same infant beauty that she wore / Is fixed upon her now forevermore.
  3. A chemical agent for cleaning metal prior to soldering or welding.
    It is important to use flux when soldering or oxides on the metal will prevent a good bond.
  4. (physics) The rate of transfer of energy (or another physical quantity) through a given surface, specifically electric flux, magnetic flux.
    That high a neutron flux would be lethal in seconds.
  5. (archaic) A disease which causes diarrhea, especially dysentery.
  6. (archaic) Diarrhea or other fluid discharge from the body.
  7. The state of being liquid through heat; fusion.

Antonyms

  • (state of ongoing change): stasis

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

flux (third-person singular simple present fluxes, present participle fluxing, simple past and past participle fluxed)

  1. (transitive) To use flux on.
    You have to flux the joint before soldering.
  2. (transitive) To melt.
  3. (intransitive) To flow as a liquid.

Related terms

  • fluxion

Adjective

flux (not comparable)

  1. (uncommon) Flowing; unstable; inconstant; variable.
    • a. 1677, Isaac Barrow, “On Contentment”, Sermon XL, in The Theological Works, Volume 2, Clarendon Press, 1818, page 375:
      The flux nature of all things here.

Related terms

  • fluxional

Related terms

  • fluctuant

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin fluxus. Doublet of fluix.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈfluks/

Noun

flux m (plural fluxos)

  1. flow

Related terms

  • fluir

Further reading

  • “flux” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin fluxus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fly/

Noun

flux m (plural flux)

  1. flow
  2. flood, flood tide
    Antonym: reflux
  3. (figuratively) flood (an abundance of something)

Derived terms

Further reading

  • “flux” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Old French

Noun

flux m (oblique plural flux, nominative singular flux, nominative plural flux)

  1. diarrhea (rapid passage of fecal matter through the bowels)

Romanian

Etymology

Borrowed from French flux.

Noun

flux n (plural fluxuri)

  1. flow (the flow of the tide)

Declension


Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from French flux. Doublet of flujo and flojo.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfluks/, [ˈfluks]

Noun

flux m (plural fluxes)

  1. (card playing) flush (hand consisting of all cards with the same suit)
  2. (Venezuela, colloquial, Dominican Republic, dated) suit (set of clothes)
    Synonyms: terno, traje

Further reading

  • “flux” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.


English

Etymology 1

Blend of melt +‎ weld; alternatively, from English melled (mingled; blended), past participle of mell.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mɛld/
  • Rhymes: -ɛld

Verb

meld (third-person singular simple present melds, present participle melding, simple past and past participle melded)

  1. (US) to combine multiple similar objects into one.
    One can meld copper and zinc together to form brass.
    Much as America’s motto celebrates melding many into one, South Africa’s says that it doesn’t matter what you look like — we can all be proud of our young country. – The New York Times, 26/02/2007 [1]
Synonyms
  • conflate
Related terms
  • melt
  • weld
Translations

Etymology 2

Probably borrowed from Dutch or German melden (to report, announce). Compare cognate Middle English melden (to call out, accuse), from Old English meldian (to declare, announce, tell).

Verb

meld (third-person singular simple present melds, present participle melding, simple past and past participle melded)

  1. In card games, especially of the rummy family, to announce or display a combination of cards.
Translations

Noun

meld (plural melds)

  1. A combination of cards which is melded.
Translations

References

  • “meld”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.

Danish

Verb

meld

  1. imperative of melde

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɛlt

Verb

meld

  1. first-person singular present indicative of melden
  2. imperative of melden

Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

meld

  1. imperative of melde

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

From Old Norse meldr.

Alternative forms

  • melder m

Noun

meld m (definite singular melden, indefinite plural meldar, definite plural meldane)

  1. grinding, crushing
  2. an amount of grain that is to be milled
  3. an amount of flour that returns from the mill
Related terms
  • mala, male (to grind, crush)
  • mjøl n

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Participle

meld (neuter singular meldt, definite singular and plural melde)

  1. past participle of melde

Verb

meld

  1. imperative of melda and melde

References

  • “meld” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

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