flux vs mix what difference

what is difference between flux and mix

English

Etymology

From Old French flux, from Latin fluxus (flow).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /flʌks/
  • Rhymes: -ʌks

Noun

flux (countable and uncountable, plural fluxes)

  1. The act of flowing; a continuous moving on or passing by, as of a flowing stream.
    • 1730, John Arbuthnot, An Essay Concerning the Nature of Aliments
      By [] the perpetual Flux of the Liquids, a great part of the Liquids is thrown out of the Body.
    • 1991, Mann, H., Fyfe, W., Tazaki, K., & Kerrich, R., Biological Accumulation of Different Chemical Elements by Microorganisms from Yellowstone National Park, USA. Mechanisms And Phylogeny Of Mineralization In Biological Systems, 357-362.
      Investigation of the silica budget for the Upper and Lower Geyser Basins of Yellowstone National Park by Truesdell et al. suggest that the present fluxes of hotspring water and thermal energy may have been continuous for at least the past 10,000 yr.
  2. A state of ongoing change.
    The schedule is in flux at the moment.
    Languages, like our bodies, are in a continual flux.
    • 1856, Richard Chenevix Trench, On the Death of an Infant
      Her image has escaped the flux of things, / And that same infant beauty that she wore / Is fixed upon her now forevermore.
  3. A chemical agent for cleaning metal prior to soldering or welding.
    It is important to use flux when soldering or oxides on the metal will prevent a good bond.
  4. (physics) The rate of transfer of energy (or another physical quantity) through a given surface, specifically electric flux, magnetic flux.
    That high a neutron flux would be lethal in seconds.
  5. (archaic) A disease which causes diarrhea, especially dysentery.
  6. (archaic) Diarrhea or other fluid discharge from the body.
  7. The state of being liquid through heat; fusion.

Antonyms

  • (state of ongoing change): stasis

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

flux (third-person singular simple present fluxes, present participle fluxing, simple past and past participle fluxed)

  1. (transitive) To use flux on.
    You have to flux the joint before soldering.
  2. (transitive) To melt.
  3. (intransitive) To flow as a liquid.

Related terms

  • fluxion

Adjective

flux (not comparable)

  1. (uncommon) Flowing; unstable; inconstant; variable.
    • a. 1677, Isaac Barrow, “On Contentment”, Sermon XL, in The Theological Works, Volume 2, Clarendon Press, 1818, page 375:
      The flux nature of all things here.

Related terms

  • fluxional

Related terms

  • fluctuant

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin fluxus. Doublet of fluix.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈfluks/

Noun

flux m (plural fluxos)

  1. flow

Related terms

  • fluir

Further reading

  • “flux” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin fluxus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fly/

Noun

flux m (plural flux)

  1. flow
  2. flood, flood tide
    Antonym: reflux
  3. (figuratively) flood (an abundance of something)

Derived terms

Further reading

  • “flux” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Old French

Noun

flux m (oblique plural flux, nominative singular flux, nominative plural flux)

  1. diarrhea (rapid passage of fecal matter through the bowels)

Romanian

Etymology

Borrowed from French flux.

Noun

flux n (plural fluxuri)

  1. flow (the flow of the tide)

Declension


Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from French flux. Doublet of flujo and flojo.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfluks/, [ˈfluks]

Noun

flux m (plural fluxes)

  1. (card playing) flush (hand consisting of all cards with the same suit)
  2. (Venezuela, colloquial, Dominican Republic, dated) suit (set of clothes)
    Synonyms: terno, traje

Further reading

  • “flux” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɪks/
  • Rhymes: -ɪks
  • Homophones: micks, Micks

Alternative forms

  • mixe (archaic)

Etymology 1

From Middle English mixen, from Old English *mixian, miscian, from Proto-Germanic *miskijaną, from Proto-Indo-European *meyǵ-, *meyḱ- (to mix). Cognate with Saterland Frisian miskje (to mix, blend), Middle Dutch mischen (to mix), Low German misken, mischen (to mix), Old High German miskian, miskēn (to mix) (German mischen), Welsh mysgu (to mix), Latin misceō (mix), Ancient Greek μίγνυμι (mígnumi, to mix), Old Church Slavonic мѣсити (měsiti, to mix), Lithuanian mišti and maišyti (to mix), Sanskrit मिश्र (miśra, mixed), Persian آمیختن(âmixtan, to mix), Old English māsc (mixture, mash). More at mash.

Verb

mix (third-person singular simple present mixes, present participle mixing, simple past and past participle mixed)

  1. (transitive) To stir together.
  2. (transitive) To combine (items from two or more sources normally kept separate).
  3. (transitive, intransitive) To form by mingling; to produce by the stirring together of ingredients; to concoct from different parts.
    • 1623, Francis Bacon, An Advertisement touching an Holy War
      I have chosen an argument mixed of religious and civil considerations.
  4. (transitive) To blend by the use of a mixer (machine).
  5. (transitive, music) To combine (several tracks).
  6. (transitive, music) To produce a finished version of (a recording).
  7. (transitive, intransitive) To unite with in company; to join; to associate.
    • 1866, William Henderson, Notes on the Folk-lore of the Northern Counties of England and the Borders (page 183)
      The mention of the six knots of elderwood is curious, for that tree mixes largely in folk lore.
Synonyms
  • (stir two or more substances together): blend, combine, mingle, intermix, mix together, mix up; See also Thesaurus:mix
  • (combine items from two or more sources normally kept separate): mix together, mix up, muddle, muddle up
Derived terms
  • bemix
  • downmix
  • inmix
  • mixed
  • mixing
  • overmix
  • undermix
Related terms
Translations

Etymology 2

A merger of a nominal use of the verb and a borrowing from Anglo-Norman mixte, from Latin mixtus, past participle of misceō (mix). Nowadays regarded automatically as the nominal form of the verb.

Noun

mix (plural mixes)

  1. The result of mixing two or more substances; a mixture.
  2. The result of combining items normally kept separate.
  3. (music) The result of mixing several tracks.
  4. (music) The finished version of a recording.
  5. (US, slang, uncountable) A substance used to dilute or adulterate an illicit drug.
    Synonym: cut
    • 1977, John Allen, Assault with a Deadly Weapon: The Autobiography of a Street Criminal, New York: Pantheon Books, Chapter 11, p. 160,[2]
      Eventually I could taste different drugs and tell how much mix in it or if there’s too much mix in it or what have you.
Derived terms
Translations

References

Further reading

  • mix in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • mix in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • IMX, XMI

Catalan

Etymology

Probably from Andalusian Arabic مش(mašš).

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈmiʃ/

Noun

mix m (plural mixos, feminine mixa)

  1. (usually repeated) A sound used to call a domestic cat.
  2. (colloquial) The domestic cat.

Synonyms

  • (domestic cat): gat, moix

Further reading

  • “mix” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “mix” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “mix” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “mix” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Classical Nahuatl

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈmíːʃ]

Noun

mīx (inanimate)

  1. second-person singular possessive singular of īxtli; (it is) your eye.
  2. second-person singular possessive plural of īxtli; (they are) your eyes.

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English mix.

Pronunciation

Noun

mix m (plural mixen, diminutive mixje n)

  1. mix, mixture
  2. hybrid

Synonyms

  • mengeling (1)
  • kruising (2)

French

Etymology

Borrowed from English mix.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /miks/

Noun

mix m (plural mix or mixes)

  1. (music) mix

Related terms

  • mixer
  • mixeur

German

Pronunciation

Verb

mix

  1. singular imperative of mixen
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of mixen

Spanish

Noun

mix m (plural mix)

  1. mix

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