flyspeck vs wee what difference

what is difference between flyspeck and wee

English

Etymology

fly +‎ speck

Noun

flyspeck (plural flyspecks or flyspeck)

  1. Housefly excrement, visible as a minuscule black dot.
  2. (by extension) Anything tiny or insignificant.
    Hyponym: (always a person) pissant

Verb

flyspeck (third-person singular simple present flyspecks, present participle flyspecking, simple past and past participle flyspecked)

  1. To bespeckle with tiny spatters of color.
  2. To inspect in minute detail to ensure that something contains no flaws; nitpick.


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: , IPA(key): /wiː/
  • Rhymes: -iː
  • Homophones: oui, we, whee (in accents with the wine-whine merger), Wii

Etymology 1

From Middle English wey, weygh, wegh, weȝe, wæȝe (little bit), from Old English wǣġ, wǣġe (weight), from Proto-Germanic *wēgō (scales, weight) and *wēgǭ (weight), related to Middle English weġan (to move, weigh) (15c).

Adjective

wee (comparative weer, superlative weest)

  1. (Scotland, Ireland, Northern England, New Zealand) Small, little.
    • 2008, James Kelman, Kieron Smith, Boy, Penguin 2009, p. 73:
      I had not seen a wee boy do it like that before. He was weer than me and his swimming was just like splashing about.
    You looked a little cold, so I lit a wee fire.
Translations

Noun

wee

  1. A short time or short distance.

References

  • Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary: Tenth Edition (1997)

Etymology 2

Onomatopoeic for the sound of urination. The noun derives from the verb.

Noun

wee (uncountable)

  1. (colloquial, uncountable) Urine.
  2. (colloquial) An act of urination.
    I need to have a wee
Synonyms
  • (all senses): wee-wee
  • (urine): See Thesaurus:urine
  • (urination): See Thesaurus:urination
Translations

Verb

wee (third-person singular simple present wees, present participle weeing, simple past and past participle weed)

  1. (colloquial) To urinate.
Synonyms
  • wee-wee, see also Thesaurus:urinate
Derived terms
  • wee-wee
Translations

Etymology 3

  • see we

Pronoun

wee (personal pronoun)

  1. obsolete emphatic of we
    • 1645 Marhc, John Milton, Tetrachordon.

Anagrams

  • Ewe, eew, ewe

Afar

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /weː/
  • Hyphenation: wee

Verb

wee

  1. (transitive) to lack

Conjugation

This verb needs an inflection-table template.

References

  • Mohamed Hassan Kamil (2015) L’afar: description grammaticale d’une langue couchitique (Djibouti, Erythrée et Ethiopie)[1], Paris: Université Sorbonne Paris Cité (doctoral thesis)

Dutch

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *wai. Compare Old English (English woe), Old High German (German weh), Old Norse vei.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʋeː/
  • Rhymes: -eː

Adjective

wee (not comparable)

  1. nauseating

Inflection

Noun

wee f (plural weeën, diminutive weetje n)

  1. contraction during labour or childbirth
  2. (archaic) sorrow, sadness, pain, woe (used in interjections of despair or annoyance)

Derived terms

  • (sorrow): o wee, ach en wee, heimwee

Anagrams

  • Ewe

Kikuyu

Pronoun

wee (second person singular)

  1. Alternative spelling of we (you, thou)

Middle Dutch

Etymology

From Old Dutch *wē, from Proto-Germanic *wai.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /weː/

Interjection

wêe

  1. woe!

Descendants

  • Dutch: wee

Adjective

wêe

  1. unpleasant, painful

Inflection

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants

  • Dutch: wee

Noun

wêe f

  1. pain

Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants

  • Dutch: wee
  • Limburgish: wieë

Further reading

  • “wee”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “wee (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page I

Middle English

Noun

wee

  1. Alternative form of we (woe)

Scots

Pronunciation

  • enPR: , IPA(key): /wiː/

Adjective

wee (comparative weer, superlative weest)

  1. (standard, Ulster) small, little, tiny

Yola

Etymology

From Middle English wiþ, from Old English wiþ.

Preposition

wee

  1. with

Derived terms

  • w’aam
  • w’aare

References

Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith


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