foggy vs stuporous what difference

what is difference between foggy and stuporous

English

Etymology

From fog +‎ -y, originally in the sense “covered with tall grass; marshy; thick”. It is not clear whether fog (mist) is a back-formation from foggy (covered with tall, obscuring grass) or has a separate Germanic origin, and hence whether foggy (covered with tall grass) and foggy (obscured by mist) represent one word or two. See fog (“mist”; “tall grass”) for more.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɒɡi/
  • Rhymes: -ɒɡi

Adjective

foggy (comparative foggier, superlative foggiest)

  1. Obscured by mist or fog; unclear; hazy
  2. (figuratively) Confused, befuddled, etc.
  3. Being, covered with, or pertaining to fog (tall grass etc that grows after, or is left after, cutting; moss)
    • 1680, Leonard Mascall, The government of cattel. Divided into three books, etc, page 221:
      For they will feed on foggy grass and such like. Also ye shall understand that horses and Cattel may not well be foddered in Winter all together, but []
    • 1772, William Ellis, Husbandry, abriged, page 98:
      [] for as he shuts up his meadow at Christmas, leaves such foggy grass behind, and manures well, in case a wet hot summer succeeds, []
    • 1808, John Stagg, Miscellaneous Poems, Some of which are in the Cumberland and Scottish Dialects, page 143:
      See swingin’ owr the foggy swaird, Begrac’d wi’ angel features, []

Derived terms

  • fogginess

Translations

References



English

Etymology

stupor +‎ -ous

Adjective

stuporous (comparative more stuporous, superlative most stuporous)

  1. having slow or confused reactions, as if in a stupor; groggy

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