follow vs postdate what difference

what is difference between follow and postdate

English

Etymology

From Middle English folwen, folȝen, folgen, from Old English folgian (to follow, pursue), from Proto-West Germanic *folgēn, from Proto-Germanic *fulgāną (to follow).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈfɒləʊ/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈfɑloʊ/
  • Rhymes: -ɒləʊ
  • Hyphenation: fol‧low

Verb

follow (third-person singular simple present follows, present participle following, simple past and past participle followed)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To go after; to pursue; to move behind in the same path or direction.
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To go or come after in a sequence.
    We both ordered the soup, with roast beef to follow.
  3. (transitive) To carry out (orders, instructions, etc.).
  4. (transitive) To live one’s life according to (religion, teachings, etc).
  5. (transitive) To understand, to pay attention to.
  6. (transitive) To watch, to keep track of (reports of) some event or person.
  7. (Internet, transitive) To subscribe to see content from an account on a social media platform.
  8. (transitive, intransitive) To be a logical consequence of something.
  9. (transitive) To walk in, as a road or course; to attend upon closely, as a profession or calling.

Synonyms

  • (go after in a physical space): trail, tail
  • (in a sequence): succeed; see also Thesaurus:succeed
  • (carry out): pursue
  • (be a consequence): ensue

Antonyms

  • (go after in a physical space): guide, lead
  • (go after in a sequence): precede; see also Thesaurus:precede
  • unfollow

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

See also

  • chase (verb)

Noun

follow (plural follows)

  1. (sometimes attributive) In billiards and similar games, a stroke causing a ball to follow another ball after hitting it.
    a follow shot
  2. (Internet) The act of following another user’s online activity.
    • 2012, Brett Petersel, ‎Esther Schindler, The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Twitter Marketing
      It doesn’t take too many follows to become overwhelmed with the deluge of content on Twitter.

Anagrams

  • Wollof


English

Alternative forms

  • post-date

Etymology

post- +‎ date

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈpəʊstˌdeɪt/

Verb

postdate (third-person singular simple present postdates, present participle postdating, simple past and past participle postdated)

  1. (transitive) To occur after an event or time; to exist later on in time
  2. (transitive) To assign an effective date to a document or action later than the actual date
  3. (transitive) To affix a date to after the event.

Synonyms

  • (to assign a date later than the actual date): overdate; see also Thesaurus:overdate

Antonyms

  • (to exist later on in time): predate; see also Thesaurus:predate
  • (to assign a date later than the actual date): predate; see also Thesaurus:backdate

Translations

Adjective

postdate (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) postdated; made or done after the date assigned.

Noun

postdate (plural postdates)

  1. A date on a document later than the real date on which it was written.

Anagrams

  • adoptest, despotat, spot date

French

Pronunciation

  • Homophones: postdatent, postdates

Verb

postdate

  1. first-person singular present indicative of postdater
  2. third-person singular present indicative of postdater
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of postdater
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of postdater
  5. second-person singular imperative of postdater

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