fond vs partial what difference

what is difference between fond and partial

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /fɒnd/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /fɑnd/
  • Rhymes: -ɒnd
  • Homophone: fawned (in accents with the cot-caught merger)

Etymology 1

From Middle English fond, fonned, past participle of fonnen (to be foolish, be simple, dote), equivalent to fon +‎ -ed. More at fon.

Adjective

fond (comparative fonder, superlative fondest)

  1. (chiefly with of) Having a liking or affection (for).
    • a great traveller, and fond of telling his adventures
  2. Affectionate.
  3. Indulgent.
  4. Outlandish; foolish; silly.
    Your fond dreams of flying to Jupiter have been quashed by the facts of reality.
  5. (obsolete) Foolish; simple; weak.
    • 1603, William Shakespeare, Othello, Act IV, sc. 1:
      If you are so fond over her iniquity, give her patent
      to offend, for if it touch not you, it comes near
      nobody.
    • 1605–06, William Shakespeare, Timon of Athens, sc. 2:
      Grant I may never prove so fond
      To trust man on his oath or bond.
    • 1839, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Midnight Mass For the Dying Year
      The foolish, fond Old Year,
  6. (obsolete) Doted on; regarded with affection.
Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:affectionate
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

fond (third-person singular simple present fonds, present participle fonding, simple past and past participle fonded)

  1. (obsolete) To have a foolish affection for, to be fond of.
  2. (obsolete) To caress; to fondle.
    • The Tyrian hugs and fonds thee on her breast.
Synonyms
  • (to caress): grope, pet, touch up; see also Thesaurus:fondle

Derived terms

  • fondle
Translations

Etymology 2

From French, ultimately from Latin fundus. Doublet of fund and fundus.

Noun

fond (plural fonds)

  1. The background design in lace-making.
  2. (cooking) Brown residue in pans from cooking meats and vegetables.
  3. (information science) A group of records having shared provenance.
  4. (obsolete) Foundation; bottom; groundwork.
  5. (obsolete) Fund, stock, or store.
Translations

Czech

Etymology

From French fond

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfont]

Noun

fond m

  1. fund

Derived terms

Further reading

  • fond in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • fond in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish

Etymology 1

From French fond, from Latin fundus, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰudʰmḗn. Cognate with Danish bund.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfʌnˀd̥]
  • Homophone: font

Noun

fond c or n (singular definite fonden or fondet, plural indefinite fonde or fonder)

  1. fund
  2. foundation, donation

Etymology 2

From French fond, identical to the former word.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfʌnˀd̥], [ˈfʌŋ]

Noun

fond c (singular definite fonden, plural indefinite fonder)

  1. stock, broth

Inflection


French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɔ̃/

Etymology 1

From Old French, from Latin fundus, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *bʰudʰmḗn.

Noun

fond m (plural fonds)

  1. back
  2. bottom
  3. fund; funding
  4. foundation
  5. (figuratively) basics, essence
  6. background
  7. (cooking) base
  8. (music) foundation stop on a pipe organ
Derived terms
Descendants

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

fond

  1. third-person singular present indicative of fondre

Further reading

  • “fond” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Hungarian

Alternative forms

  • fonjad

Etymology

fon +‎ -d

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfond]
  • Hyphenation: fond
  • Rhymes: -ond

Verb

fond

  1. second-person singular subjunctive present definite of fon

Ladin

Etymology

From Latin fundus.

Noun

fond m (plural fonds)

  1. fund
  2. bottom

Maltese

Etymology

From Italian fondo.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɔnt/

Adjective

fond (feminine singular fonda, plural fondi)

  1. deep
    Synonyms: għammieq, profond

Derived terms

  • fannad

Noun

fond m

  1. depth (that which is deep below; the deepest part)
    Synonyms: għamieq, profondità
  2. base; bottom
  3. fund

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English fēond.

Noun

fond (plural fondes)

  1. Alternative form of feend

Etymology 2

From fonnen +‎ -ed.

Adjective

fond

  1. Alternative form of fonned

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From French fond, from Latin fundus

Noun

fond n (definite singular fondet, indefinite plural fond, definite plural fonda or fondene)

  1. a fund

Derived terms

  • pensjonsfond

References

  • “fond” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From French fond, from Latin fundus

Noun

fond n (definite singular fondet, indefinite plural fond, definite plural fonda)

  1. a fund

Derived terms

  • pensjonsfond

References

  • “fond” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Romanian

Etymology

Borrowed from French fond, itself from Latin fundus. Doublet of the inherrited fund.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fond/

Noun

fond n (plural fonduri)

  1. fund
  2. background
  3. content, substance, essence

Declension

Derived terms

  • în fond (essentially, basically)

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From French fond

Noun

fȍnd m (Cyrillic spelling фо̏нд)

  1. fund

Declension


Swedish

Etymology

From French fond

Pronunciation

Noun

fond c

  1. fund
  2. backdrop; a theatrical scenery
  3. (“Kitchen French”) broth

Declension

Related terms

fund
  • fondera


English

Etymology

From Middle English partiall, parcial, from Old French parcial (biased or particular), from Late Latin partiālis (of or pertaining to a part), from Latin pars (part).

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈpɑɹʃəl/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈpɑːʃəl/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)ʃəl
  • Hyphenation: par‧tial

Adjective

partial (comparative more partial, superlative most partial)

  1. existing as a part or portion; incomplete
  2. (computer science) describing a property that holds only when an algorithm terminates
  3. biased in favor of a person, side, or point of view, especially when dealing with a competition or dispute
    Antonym: impartial
    • 17th century, Alexander Pope, a letter
  4. (followed by the preposition to) having a predilection for something
    Synonym: fond of
  5. (mathematics) of or relating to a partial derivative or partial differential
  6. (botany) subordinate

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Noun

partial (plural partials)

  1. (mathematics) A partial derivative: a derivative with respect to one independent variable of a function in multiple variables while holding the other variables constant.
  2. (music) Any of the sine waves which make up a complex tone; often an overtone or harmonic of the fundamental.
  3. (dentistry) dentures that replace only some of the natural teeth
  4. (forensics) An incomplete fingerprint
  5. (programming, Internet) A fragment of a template containing markup.
    • 2009, Antonio Cangiano, Ruby on Rails for Microsoft Developers (page 356)
      In fact, as seen in Chapters 5 and 6, the resulting document is usually the product of rendering a layout, which yields the rendering of the template at hand, which in turn can invoke the rendering of other templates and/or one or more partials.

Verb

partial (third-person singular simple present partials, present participle partialing or partialling, simple past and past participle partialed or partialled)

  1. (statistics, transitive) To take the partial regression coefficient.

Further reading

  • partial in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • partial in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • partial at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • patrial

French

Etymology

From Middle French partial, borrowed from Late Latin partiālis (of or pertaining to a part), from Latin pars (part).
Doublet of partiel.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /paʁ.sjal/

Adjective

partial (feminine singular partiale, masculine plural partiaux, feminine plural partiales)

  1. partial, biased

Further reading

  • “partial” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

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