fond vs warm what difference

what is difference between fond and warm

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /fɒnd/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /fɑnd/
  • Rhymes: -ɒnd
  • Homophone: fawned (in accents with the cot-caught merger)

Etymology 1

From Middle English fond, fonned, past participle of fonnen (to be foolish, be simple, dote), equivalent to fon +‎ -ed. More at fon.

Adjective

fond (comparative fonder, superlative fondest)

  1. (chiefly with of) Having a liking or affection (for).
    • a great traveller, and fond of telling his adventures
  2. Affectionate.
  3. Indulgent.
  4. Outlandish; foolish; silly.
    Your fond dreams of flying to Jupiter have been quashed by the facts of reality.
  5. (obsolete) Foolish; simple; weak.
    • 1603, William Shakespeare, Othello, Act IV, sc. 1:
      If you are so fond over her iniquity, give her patent
      to offend, for if it touch not you, it comes near
      nobody.
    • 1605–06, William Shakespeare, Timon of Athens, sc. 2:
      Grant I may never prove so fond
      To trust man on his oath or bond.
    • 1839, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Midnight Mass For the Dying Year
      The foolish, fond Old Year,
  6. (obsolete) Doted on; regarded with affection.
Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:affectionate
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

fond (third-person singular simple present fonds, present participle fonding, simple past and past participle fonded)

  1. (obsolete) To have a foolish affection for, to be fond of.
  2. (obsolete) To caress; to fondle.
    • The Tyrian hugs and fonds thee on her breast.
Synonyms
  • (to caress): grope, pet, touch up; see also Thesaurus:fondle

Derived terms

  • fondle
Translations

Etymology 2

From French, ultimately from Latin fundus. Doublet of fund and fundus.

Noun

fond (plural fonds)

  1. The background design in lace-making.
  2. (cooking) Brown residue in pans from cooking meats and vegetables.
  3. (information science) A group of records having shared provenance.
  4. (obsolete) Foundation; bottom; groundwork.
  5. (obsolete) Fund, stock, or store.
Translations

Czech

Etymology

From French fond

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfont]

Noun

fond m

  1. fund

Derived terms

Further reading

  • fond in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • fond in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish

Etymology 1

From French fond, from Latin fundus, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰudʰmḗn. Cognate with Danish bund.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfʌnˀd̥]
  • Homophone: font

Noun

fond c or n (singular definite fonden or fondet, plural indefinite fonde or fonder)

  1. fund
  2. foundation, donation

Etymology 2

From French fond, identical to the former word.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfʌnˀd̥], [ˈfʌŋ]

Noun

fond c (singular definite fonden, plural indefinite fonder)

  1. stock, broth

Inflection


French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɔ̃/

Etymology 1

From Old French, from Latin fundus, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *bʰudʰmḗn.

Noun

fond m (plural fonds)

  1. back
  2. bottom
  3. fund; funding
  4. foundation
  5. (figuratively) basics, essence
  6. background
  7. (cooking) base
  8. (music) foundation stop on a pipe organ
Derived terms
Descendants

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

fond

  1. third-person singular present indicative of fondre

Further reading

  • “fond” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Hungarian

Alternative forms

  • fonjad

Etymology

fon +‎ -d

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfond]
  • Hyphenation: fond
  • Rhymes: -ond

Verb

fond

  1. second-person singular subjunctive present definite of fon

Ladin

Etymology

From Latin fundus.

Noun

fond m (plural fonds)

  1. fund
  2. bottom

Maltese

Etymology

From Italian fondo.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɔnt/

Adjective

fond (feminine singular fonda, plural fondi)

  1. deep
    Synonyms: għammieq, profond

Derived terms

  • fannad

Noun

fond m

  1. depth (that which is deep below; the deepest part)
    Synonyms: għamieq, profondità
  2. base; bottom
  3. fund

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English fēond.

Noun

fond (plural fondes)

  1. Alternative form of feend

Etymology 2

From fonnen +‎ -ed.

Adjective

fond

  1. Alternative form of fonned

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From French fond, from Latin fundus

Noun

fond n (definite singular fondet, indefinite plural fond, definite plural fonda or fondene)

  1. a fund

Derived terms

  • pensjonsfond

References

  • “fond” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From French fond, from Latin fundus

Noun

fond n (definite singular fondet, indefinite plural fond, definite plural fonda)

  1. a fund

Derived terms

  • pensjonsfond

References

  • “fond” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Romanian

Etymology

Borrowed from French fond, itself from Latin fundus. Doublet of the inherrited fund.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fond/

Noun

fond n (plural fonduri)

  1. fund
  2. background
  3. content, substance, essence

Declension

Derived terms

  • în fond (essentially, basically)

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From French fond

Noun

fȍnd m (Cyrillic spelling фо̏нд)

  1. fund

Declension


Swedish

Etymology

From French fond

Pronunciation

Noun

fond c

  1. fund
  2. backdrop; a theatrical scenery
  3. (“Kitchen French”) broth

Declension

Related terms

fund
  • fondera


English

Alternative forms

  • warme (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /wɔːm/
  • (US) IPA(key): /wɔɹm/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)m

Etymology 1

From Middle English warm, werm, from Old English wearm, from Proto-West Germanic *warm, from Proto-Germanic *warmaz, with different proposed origins:

  1. Proto-Indo-European *gʷʰer- (warm, hot), related to Ancient Greek θερμός (thermós), Latin formus, Sanskrit घर्म (gharma).
  2. Proto-Indo-European *wer- (to burn), related to Hittite [script needed] (warnuzi) and to Old Church Slavonic варити (variti).

The dispute is due to differing opinions on how initial Proto-Indo-European *gʷʰ- evolved in Germanic: some think that *gʷʰ would have turned to *b, and that the root *gʷʰer- would instead have given rise to burn etc. Some have also proposed a merger of the two roots.

Adjective

warm (comparative warmer, superlative warmest)

  1. Having a temperature slightly higher than usual, but still pleasant; mildly hot.
    The tea is still warm.
    This is a very warm room.
    • 1863, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, The Herons of Elmwood
      Warm and still is the summer night.
  2. Caring and friendly, of relations to another person.
    We have a warm friendship.
  3. Having a color in the red-orange-yellow part of the visible electromagnetic spectrum.
  4. Close, often used in the context of a game in which “warm” and “cold” are used to indicate nearness to the goal.
    • 1876, William Black, Madcap Violet
      Here, indeed, young Mr. Dowse was getting “warm“, as children say at blindman’s buff.
  5. Fresh, of a scent; still able to be traced.
  6. (figuratively) Communicating a sense of comfort, ease, or pleasantness
    a warm piano sound
  7. (archaic) Ardent, zealous.
    a warm debate, with strong words exchanged
    • I had been none of the warmest of partisans.
    • 1776, Edward Gibbon, The History of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Chapter 1
      To the strength and fierceness of barbarians they added a contempt for life, which was derived from a warm persuasion of the immortality and transmigration of the soul.
  8. (archaic, colloquial) Well off as to property, or in good circumstances; prosperous.
    • You shall have a draught upon him, payable at sight: and let me tell you he is as warm a man as any within five miles round him.
    • 1791, Charlotte Smith, Celestina, Broadview 2004, p. 258:
      Mrs. and the Miss Cathcarts began to be considered as people of some consequence in the circle in which they moved, while he gradually obtained in the city the name of a warm man.
    • I know the Stuyvesant family —puff— every one of them —puff— not a more respectable family in the province —puff— old standards —puff— warm householders —puff— none of your upstarts
  9. (archaic) Requiring arduous effort.
    • 1929, The Listener (issues 41-50, page 552)
      The circular iron platform over there is used in the task of tyring the wheels, a warm job, too, by the way.
Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:warm
  • See also Thesaurus:affectionate
  • See also Thesaurus:difficult
Antonyms
  • (mild temperature): Arctic, cold, cool, frozen
  • (caring): Arctic, cold, cool, frozen
Derived terms
Translations

See also

  • heated
  • hot
  • steamy
  • temperature
  • tepid

Etymology 2

From Old English werman.

Verb

warm (third-person singular simple present warms, present participle warming, simple past and past participle warmed)

  1. (transitive) To make or keep warm.
    • Then shall it [an ash tree] be for a man to burn; for he will take thereof and warm himself.
    • 1825, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Morituri Salutamus
      enough to warm, but not enough to burn
  2. (intransitive) To become warm, to heat up.
    The earth soon warms on a clear summer day.
  3. (transitive with to) (sometimes in the form warm up) To favour increasingly.
  4. (intransitive) To become ardent or animated.
    The speaker warms as he proceeds.
  5. (transitive) To make engaged or earnest; to interest; to engage; to excite ardor or zeal in; to enliven.
    • November 20, 1717, Alexander Pope, letter to the Bishop of Rochester
      there was a collection of all that had been written{{..}}: I warmed my head with them.
    • Bright hopes, that erst the bosom warmed.
  6. (transitive, colloquial) To beat or spank.
    • 1945, The Atlantic (volume 176, page 94)
      Not bothering to turn around and not missing a mouthful, Myrtle comforted her with threats of “I’ll warm your bottom”; “I’ll turn you over to your dad”; “I’ll lock you in the truck”; “I’ll send for the bogey man” — all of which Darleen ignored []
Derived terms
  • like death warmed over
Translations

Noun

warm (plural warms)

  1. (colloquial) The act of warming, or the state of being warmed; a heating.

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch warm, from Middle Dutch warm, from Old Dutch warm, from Proto-Germanic *warmaz.

Adjective

warm (attributive warmer, comparative warmste, superlative warmste)

  1. warm

Alemannic German

Alternative forms

  • woare, woarm, wore, wérme

Etymology

From Middle High German warm, from Old High German warm. Cognate with German warm, Dutch warm, English warm, Icelandic varmur.

Adjective

warm

  1. (Formazza) warm

References

  • “warm” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle isole linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch warm, from Old Dutch warm, from Proto-West Germanic *warm, from Proto-Germanic *warmaz, of uncertain origin; derivations from either Proto-Indo-European *gʷʰer- (warm, hot) or *wer- (to burn) have been proposed.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʋɑr(ə)m/
  • Hyphenation: warm
  • Rhymes: -ɑrm

Adjective

warm (comparative warmer, superlative warmst)

  1. warm, hot
    Antonym: koud
  2. (meteorology, officially) 20 °C or more

Inflection

Derived terms

  • warmte
  • warmwater

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: warm
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: warum
  • Negerhollands: warm, werm

See also

  • tropisch
  • zomers

German

Etymology

From Middle High German and Old High German warm.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /varm/, [vaʁm], [vaɐ̯m], [vaːm], [ʋ-]

Adjective

warm (comparative wärmer, superlative am wärmsten)

  1. warm; mildly hot
    Antonyms: kalt, kühl
  2. (of clothes) warm; keeping the wearer warm
  3. (dated, except in warmer Bruder) homosexual, gay
    Synonym: schwul

Usage notes

  • German warm means “warm”, but not “feeling warm”; therefore the phrase ich bin warm (literally I am warm) would mean that one’s body has a high temperature, particularly that one’s skin is warm on the outside. The English “I am warm” (that is: I feel warm) is equivalent to German mir ist warm (literally to me it’s warm).
  • Although warm (gay) is not in general use, this sense is current enough to make it advisable not to describe the relation between two men as warm (unless the implication is intended).

Declension

Derived terms

Adverb

warm

  1. (of rent-paying) including utilities
    Antonym: kalt

Derived terms

  • Warmmiete

Further reading

  • “warm” in Duden online

Middle Dutch

Etymology

From Old Dutch warm, from Proto-West Germanic *warm

Adjective

warm

  1. warm, hot
  2. warm, keeping the wearer warm (of clothes)
  3. warm (of emotions)

Inflection

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Alternative forms

  • wāerm
  • werm

Descendants

  • Dutch: warm
    • Afrikaans: warm
  • Limburgish: werm
  • West Flemish: werm

Further reading

  • “warm”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “warm”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • warme, werm, wearm

Etymology

From Old English wearm

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /warm/, /wɛrm/

Adjective

warm (plural and weak singular warme, comparative warmer, superlative warmest)

  1. (temperature) warm, mildly hot
  2. (weather) warm, pleasant, mild
  3. heated, warmed
  4. (locations or garments) having a tendency to be warm; designed to stay warm
  5. Being at a healthy temperature
  6. enthusiastic, vigourous

Descendants

  • Scots: wairm
  • English: warm

References

  • “warm, adj.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-03-26.

Noun

warm

  1. warmness, heat

References

  • “warm, adj.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-03-26.

Old High German

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *warm

Adjective

warm

  1. warm

Derived terms

  • warmī

Descendants

  • Middle High German: warm
    • Alemannic German: warm
      • Italian Walser: warm, woare, woarm, wore, wérme
    • Bavarian: borm
      • Cimbrian: barm
      • Mòcheno: bòrm
      • Udinese: borm, borbm, boarm
      • Viennese: wårm
    • Central Franconian: wärm, warm
      • Hunsrik: waarem
    • German: warm
    • Luxembourgish: waarm
    • Yiddish: וואַרעם(varem)

Old Saxon

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *warm (warm)

Adjective

warm (comparative warmoro, superlative warmost)

  1. warm

Declension




Descendants

  • Middle Low German: warm
    • Low German: warm
    • German Low German: warm

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial